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have you heard of these people? Retraining

#1 User is offline   cloudsurfing 

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Posted 03 November 2009 - 04:45 PM

has any one heard anything about Software support and training limited christchurch?
I asked ACC about retraining and they sent me the paper work for this course, it is meant to be one of the jobs they think I can do.
be nice to hear some feed back about the course
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#2 User is offline   neddy 

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Posted 03 November 2009 - 07:34 PM

View Postcloudsurfing, on Nov 3 2009, 06:45 PM, said:

has any one heard anything about Software support and training limited christchurch?
I asked ACC about retraining and they sent me the paper work for this course, it is meant to be one of the jobs they think I can do.
be nice to hear some feed back about the course

It seems they offer an online training package called ICT Skills Benchmark which is developed by an offshoot company of Monash University in Melbourne.

You should establish the following in my opinion:
* Just what do you curently know about IT, personal computing, software etc.
* What do you need training in
* Is the qualification measurable and is is accepted and used widely internationally

The only standards out there are the International Computer Driver Liscence, info at http://www.icdl.co.nz or the Microsoft Certification found at http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en/us/ce...t-overview.aspx

What intrigues me is that learning "about" databases and spreadsheets along as wordprocessing is all very well, but for most organisations seeming to offer these courses, the software they are training is old or outdated and they never seem to keep up with new versions or revisions.

Software is changing all the time eg Windows 7 has been released alongside Appples new OS and Office 10 is slated for release later this year.

For training to be effective, it must take count of the changing face of computing whether that is in the imminent release of new OS's like Google's new Chrome or even other open sourced software.

What I'm trying to say is you need to establish why you need the training and for what pupose in the knowledge of what you learn today may not be right or correct in the future. Learning must continue.
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#3 User is offline   doppelganger 

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Posted 03 November 2009 - 09:21 PM

They are asking you to do some training so they must have some kind if employment in line. Ask case manager when the course is completed where can you obtain employment. Go and check to make sure that the course will be what is needed to obtain employment. This means that you will need to talk to employers
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#4 User is offline   cloudsurfing 

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Posted 04 November 2009 - 12:26 AM

View Postmaungataniwha, on Nov 3 2009, 07:44 PM, said:

Good luck for the retraining. Never ever got any but started asking from 1996...


Thanks, me too and this is the first time they've come back with something, so I'm naturally looking for the catch lol.
Maybe you should ask again?
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#5 User is offline   cloudsurfing 

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Posted 04 November 2009 - 12:30 AM

View Postneddy, on Nov 3 2009, 09:34 PM, said:

It seems they offer an online training package called ICT Skills Benchmark which is developed by an offshoot company of Monash University in Melbourne.

You should establish the following in my opinion:
* Just what do you curently know about IT, personal computing, software etc.
* What do you need training in
* Is the qualification measurable and is is accepted and used widely internationally

The only standards out there are the International Computer Driver Liscence, info at http://www.icdl.co.nz or the Microsoft Certification found at http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en/us/ce...t-overview.aspx

What intrigues me is that learning "about" databases and spreadsheets along as wordprocessing is all very well, but for most organisations seeming to offer these courses, the software they are training is old or outdated and they never seem to keep up with new versions or revisions.

Software is changing all the time eg Windows 7 has been released alongside Appples new OS and Office 10 is slated for release later this year.

For training to be effective, it must take count of the changing face of computing whether that is in the imminent release of new OS's like Google's new Chrome or even other open sourced software.

What I'm trying to say is you need to establish why you need the training and for what pupose in the knowledge of what you learn today may not be right or correct in the future. Learning must continue.


Thank you.
That the right kind of conversation I needed right now.
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#6 User is offline   cloudsurfing 

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Posted 04 November 2009 - 12:36 AM

View Postdoppelganger, on Nov 3 2009, 11:21 PM, said:

They are asking you to do some training so they must have some kind if employment in line. Ask case manager when the course is completed where can you obtain employment. Go and check to make sure that the course will be what is needed to obtain employment. This means that you will need to talk to employers



Yes they do, though checking there work type detail sheet website the job nolonger exists, I await my case managers reply.
moving along with jobs around that area, yes I too thought I should go ask people in that area if they think the course will help improve my chances of gaining employment, and if it is more or less an hourly wage than what I'm earning now, as I assume this also comes into play?

Thank you.
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#7 User is offline   scared 

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Posted 04 November 2009 - 07:24 AM

Are they thinking you can do an office job, or an I.T. job?
These are really two very different things. Office job then you need to know xp and office 2003, and 2007, both are used extensively in the workpalce. You will need to get up to speed on Excell and Word, powerpoint and access.
If it is an actual I.T. job - well you will need way more then just an online training course - you will need some hands on. Certs are very well and good but if you are going into the I.T. field you will need to know what field you are interested in - Server administration or helpdesk or web design or??? there are alot of options.
If they are offering you a base 6 week course - it won't get you anywhere, if it is a valid 2 year program or more, then you will be hirable.
Even call-centre staff need to know how to use word and excell plus how to get around in XP.
What is the length of the training they are offering you?
I.T is a very very changeable job, and you have to be able to learn constantly and remember heaps.
Other certs to look at are the A+ certification courses and things like the MSDST (desktop support).
Good Luck
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#8 User is offline   MINI 

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Posted 04 November 2009 - 08:00 AM

In 2007 when doing my IoA I went to a few job centres to see what speeds they wanted on the keyboard, because my background is accounts and law, but not accounts on puter.

Having shoulder injuries and operations means my speeds were down considerably. And cognitive all over the place so spelling interfered with.

Used to have inhouse computer were speed didnt matter, but accuracy was imperative. Consequently never used a PC. No time left in the day once finished that job, to study and never had puter at home.

So there were no jobs in my field where speeds below 50 words a minute were not needed. And strokes for inputing figures was just huge. Plus at my age, experience on all these difference computer accounting packages was needed and I had only had a bit of MYOB!!

So the point was, I was qualified for anything other than what I had been doing. And ACC didnt even go there, after seeing the way I was treated by an accredited employer!!!

So lots of things come into if you can reasonably expected to work or not.

Good Luck whatever you decide, all training is worth it, but if it reaches the outcome you need is another thing.

Mini
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#9 User is offline   neddy 

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Posted 04 November 2009 - 12:48 PM

View PostMINI, on Nov 4 2009, 10:00 AM, said:

In 2007 when doing my IoA I went to a few job centres to see what speeds they wanted on the keyboard, because my background is accounts and law, but not accounts on puter.

Having shoulder injuries and operations means my speeds were down considerably. And cognitive all over the place so spelling interfered with.

Used to have inhouse computer were speed didnt matter, but accuracy was imperative. Consequently never used a PC. No time left in the day once finished that job, to study and never had puter at home.

So there were no jobs in my field where speeds below 50 words a minute were not needed. And strokes for inputing figures was just huge. Plus at my age, experience on all these difference computer accounting packages was needed and I had only had a bit of MYOB!!

So the point was, I was qualified for anything other than what I had been doing. And ACC didnt even go there, after seeing the way I was treated by an accredited employer!!!

So lots of things come into if you can reasonably expected to work or not.

Good Luck whatever you decide, all training is worth it, but if it reaches the outcome you need is another thing.

Mini



One of the paradoxes of job specs is the inability of assessors to accurately determine the actual required skills for the tasks required.
For example I bet there are many mechanics who have a tool in their kit that is used for one specific task only and may be used so rarely that one wonders whether to invest in that tool or not.

Likewise we need to prioritise just what IT skills are rquired for a specific job.

Having the ability to use Photoshop and ability to design webpages plus the use of MYOB is great but if you go into a majority of workplaces, they will have Inhouse bespoke custom designed software (and hardware) specific for that job, that is why industry has to spend a lot of money on training for Their Specific Needs.

There needs IMHO to be a breakdown of what specific skills and packages suit that job.

Having the basics of Wordprocessing is a must and the knowledge of how a database and spreadsheet operate is highly desirable if not a rquirement, but the use of formulae and Visual Basic a la Macro's etc are only needed in specialist fields and if one is let loose on an inhouse database other than filling in required fields (thtis not changing the basic design of the database)) then all hell can break loose, just as changing just one formula in a spreadsheet can alter everything.

In my experience, most companies will use software designed for a soecific task eg Point of Sale software where evrything is linked and requires minimal input and virtually no knowledge of the complexities of the software, you input the sale details, it calculates the price, tax, adjusts the inventory and may even generate an order to a supplier for more stock.

You need to take stock of what you know, what you can do and what is required to fill those gaps that may be missing.

Get up to speed on a keyboard, use a Typing Tutor there aer a few free ones if you Google, play with Word, use the F1 help file and try to create different documents etc.

As Mini say's and this is important, "all training is worth it,"
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#10 User is offline   cloudsurfing 

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Posted 06 November 2009 - 11:21 AM

Okay for anyone else that may in the future need this information
The course is Office Skills and Customer service a 35 or 60 hours course that Anne Potter has requested be put together to assist people moving into the broad umbrella of General clerk /admin/ areas, it is only available to people referred by Anne Potter
It is not NZQA registered.
Systems used are XP and windows 7
Apparently are set up to not create further injury, if needed Referral Company can have the place assessed for further aids.

You get a one-year access to online training no certificate and MYOB online is Australian they are currently looking into a NZ version.
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#11 User is offline   neddy 

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Posted 06 November 2009 - 12:31 PM

View Postcloudsurfing, on Nov 6 2009, 01:21 PM, said:

Okay for anyone else that may in the future need this information
The course is Office Skills and Customer service a 35 or 60 hours course that Anne Potter has requested be put together to assist people moving into the broad umbrella of General clerk /admin/ areas, it is only available to people referred by Anne Potter
It is not NZQA registered.
Systems used are XP and windows 7
Apparently are set up to not create further injury, if needed Referral Company can have the place assessed for further aids.

You get a one-year access to online training no certificate and MYOB online is Australian they are currently looking into a NZ version.


I would be wary of an Ad Hoc programme set up specifically for one provider eg Anne Potter who will use the information and data gathered to put together a case to say you are experienced in Office Skills and Customer Services.

I know how to wire a three point plug and mend a fuse, but that does not make me an electrician, like having the knowledge to cook a meal does not make me a Chef.

To have the skill requires you to have hands on experience in my opinion and the only way to get that is by expeririencing the practical besides all the theory.

having te knowlwedge of is not the experiencing of and that is important.
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#12 User is offline   Sparrow 

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Posted 06 November 2009 - 01:04 PM

never never never trust Anne Pototer and the antics she gets up to
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#13 User is offline   cloudsurfing 

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Posted 06 November 2009 - 02:37 PM

View Postneddy, on Nov 6 2009, 02:31 PM, said:

I would be wary of an Ad Hoc programme set up specifically for one provider eg Anne Potter who will use the information and data gathered to put together a case to say you are experienced in Office Skills and Customer Services.

I know how to wire a three point plug and mend a fuse, but that does not make me an electrician, like having the knowledge to cook a meal does not make me a Chef.

To have the skill requires you to have hands on experience in my opinion and the only way to get that is by expeririencing the practical besides all the theory.

having te knowlwedge of is not the experiencing of and that is important.


Quiet agree with you Neddy
Im running the course content through some people in the industry. Im at little at a loss on what to go back to ACC with at the end, though Ive asked for work trails with ACC, and the sent me the course information.
Although the woman running the course assured me its normal practises for business to tailor make courses for their staff, and that made it all okay.
Which is all very well if I was going to work for Anne Potter wouldnt it, but Im not.
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#14 User is offline   cloudsurfing 

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Posted 06 November 2009 - 02:42 PM

View PostSparrow, on Nov 6 2009, 03:04 PM, said:

never never never trust Anne Pototer and the antics she gets up to


LOL who can you trust these days, when your sent there by ACC.
I've been to Anne Potters twice and dealt with two very different people, luck of the draw I guess.
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#15 User is offline   Fighter for Justice 

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Posted 06 November 2009 - 05:18 PM

I dealt with the firm Anne Potter in Christchurch during 2004. I personally would be very wary of that firm.
Nicky Glenjarman was the staff member I dealt with and in the end my ERC was cut due to disputes over "work ready programme" being done before any training/work trials or fitness programme. Nicky Glenjarman did not listen to what I had to say and in the end I required two Advocates support to deal with her.
In the end Nicky Glenjarman did inform ACC in writing what I and my advocates requested.
Suddenly, ACC sent me for a Section 100 Assessment with Dr Turner.
After seeing Dr Turner and getting his Report (file reviewed by Workwise), my ERC was cut in January 2005.

With Nicky Glenjarman I would record all conversations + always take a support person.
Otherwise it is your word against Nicky Glenjarman.
As stated in other peoples postings above - it seems poor to attend a computer course that leads to no national certificate or recognised programme etc.

A better path would be a recognised course, with recognised qualifications and at least a whiff of independence e.g. Polytech/University etc.

Fighter for Justice
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#16 User is offline   cloudsurfing 

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Posted 06 November 2009 - 07:18 PM

View PostFighter for Justice, on Nov 6 2009, 07:18 PM, said:

I dealt with the firm Anne Potter in Christchurch during 2004. I personally would be very wary of that firm.
Nicky Glenjarman was the staff member I dealt with and in the end my ERC was cut due to disputes over "work ready programme" being done before any training/work trials or fitness programme. Nicky Glenjarman did not listen to what I had to say and in the end I required two Advocates support to deal with her.
In the end Nicky Glenjarman did inform ACC in writing what I and my advocates requested.
Suddenly, ACC sent me for a Section 100 Assessment with Dr Turner.
After seeing Dr Turner and getting his Report (file reviewed by Workwise), my ERC was cut in January 2005.

With Nicky Glenjarman I would record all conversations + always take a support person.
Otherwise it is your word against Nicky Glenjarman.
As stated in other peoples postings above - it seems poor to attend a computer course that leads to no national certificate or recognised programme etc.

A better path would be a recognised course, with recognised qualifications and at least a whiff of independence e.g. Polytech/University etc.

Fighter for Justice


Arh yes Nicky Glenjarman, lovely lady has some rather interesting ideas dont you think.
Yes I agree in order to make me more work ready a recongnised course with recognised qualifications would certainly increase my chances of empolyment far more than an exclusive course that cannot be offered to anyone else than ACC claimants I dont think ACC see it that way.
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