ACCforum: 12 months off work granted - ACCforum

Jump to content

Page 1 of 1
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

12 months off work granted Australian Abuse

#1 User is offline   hukildaspida 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Member
  • Posts: 3353
  • Joined: 24-August 07

Posted 07 September 2008 - 03:57 PM

Heard on the Australian news this week women who are physically & sexually abused in Domestic Relationships they have left in Australia have been granted 12 months off working.

Not sure if there is a link somewhere about this.

Wonder if they will pass Legislation allowing men the same Rights & those who are subjected to similiar behaviour whom are not in Domestic Relationships?

I don't know if this is "Centrelink" - the equivalent of W.I.N.Z or workers compensation who are paying for this.
0

#2 User is offline   redsquare74ucys 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 628
  • Joined: 23-June 07

Posted 10 September 2008 - 12:39 PM

Interesting post, thanks!
0

#3 User is offline   Gloria Mitchell 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 98
  • Joined: 14-February 06

Posted 10 September 2008 - 02:51 PM

View Posthukildaspida, on Sep 7 2008, 04:57 PM, said:

Heard on the Australian news this week women who are physically & sexually abused in Domestic Relationships they have left in Australia have been granted 12 months off working.

Not sure if there is a link somewhere about this.

Wonder if they will pass Legislation allowing men the same Rights & those who are subjected to similiar behaviour whom are not in Domestic Relationships?

I don't know if this is "Centrelink" - the equivalent of W.I.N.Z or workers compensation who are paying for this.


I haven't picked that up on our news here, but will keep my eye out.

Gloria.
0

#4 User is offline   hukildaspida 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Member
  • Posts: 3353
  • Joined: 24-August 07

Posted 25 November 2008 - 04:34 PM

View PostGloria Mitchell, on Sep 10 2008, 03:51 PM, said:

I haven't picked that up on our news here, but will keep my eye out.

Gloria.



Hi Gloria & others in Australia, did you hear or read any more on this?

Would be good for an update as it's 'White Ribbon' day today.

Thanks.
0

#5 User is offline   hukildaspida 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Member
  • Posts: 3353
  • Joined: 24-August 07

Posted 14 March 2011 - 03:52 PM

Guess 20 days is better than nothing, but still vast room for improvement.


http://www.courierma...4-1225961158531

* From: The Courier-Mail
* November 25, 2010 11:00PM


VICTIMS of domestic violence are to get 20 days paid leave under a new plan from one of the nation's biggest building societies, in a potential first for Australian businesses.

The leave policy was yesterday unveiled by Toowoomba-based Heritage Building Society, which employs almost 700 staff, in conjunction with White Ribbon Day, which is marked to eradicate domestic violence.

The policy faces hurdles in the practicality of getting some victims being willing to access the leave. But it dovetails with other domestic-violence information programs within Heritage and the building society argues this awareness could prompt use of the policy.

Queensland Centre for Domestic and Family Violence Research director Heather Nancarrow described the initiative as "a fantastic development".

"Economic security for victims of domestic violence is critical," Ms Nancarrow said.

While universities in NSW and Victorian regional councils are known to be pushing for such leave, customer-owned Heritage is possibly the first private business to undertake such a plan.

"I hope that no one will ever use it," Heritage chief executive John Minz (pictured) said. "Our ultimate aim is to get to the time when this type of leave is no longer required."

He said the "domestic support leave policy" was brought in as part of Heritage's ongoing work with tackling domestic violence. Experts had advised staff and brochures had been produced.

Mr Minz, who this week won an award for a campaign against domestic violence, said he became aware of the policy after hearing of lobbying from groups at a political level.


and

http://www.dailytele...0-1226016380221

* HELEN POW
* From: The Sunday Telegraph
* March 06, 2011 12:00AM



BUSINESSES are being urged to give workers time off to sort out domestic violence problems at home.

Already some public servants are entitled to up to five days leave a year if they are suffering abuse at home - and by the end of the year these are expected to be joined by teachers, nurses, police officers and many council staff.

Now, with the 100th anniversary of International Women's Day this week, Sex Discrimination Commissioner Elizabeth Broderick is urging the private sector to follow suit on domestic violence leave, saying it costs employers $200 million a year in lost productivity and absenteeism..

"Domestic violence is the issue that dare not raise its name in business but it is most definitely a business issue because one in three women who experience domestic violence are in paid employment," she said.

Related Coverage

* Domestic violence victims granted leave The Daily Telegraph, 11 Feb 2011
* Violence at home remains hidden Courier Mail, 2 Jan 2011
* Women face paid leave backlash Perth Now, 5 Dec 2010
* Delay puts women in danger The Daily Telegraph, 27 Nov 2010


"Employers need to recognise that a percentage of their staff is living with this every day. Most businesses at this point say, 'Sorry, domestic violence is a private matter.' Well, it is not and we need to change that paradigm."

As well as domestic violence leave, Ms Broderick wants employers to beef-up security measures in cases where women are being harassed by their partners at work - for example, by offering to change work email addresses and phone numbers.

"Down the track, this should affect hundreds of thousands of working women in this state and it will set the benchmark for employees across the country," said Australian Domestic and Family Violence Clearance House project officer Ludo McFerran, who is lobbying unions and businesses to step up to the plate.

"At any one time, up to 10 per cent of the workforce can be affected by domestic violence and it does have an impact on work performance and productivity.

"It is in the interest of business and employers to tackle this, and urgently."

Studies show stalking or harassment at work, failing to provide child care when promised or even hiding work clothes are common ways abusive men attempt to sabotage their partner's work efforts and financial security.



Read comments
Add comments

Add your comment on this story
Comments Form
Enter your comment here *

More related coverage

* Domestic violence an epidemic Courier Mail, 24 Nov 2010
* Why Matty and Wayne are not heroes The Daily Telegraph, 29 May 2010
* It's only fair - nappy leave for new dads The Daily Telegraph, 14 May 2010
* Job for the boys The Daily Telegraph, 17 Apr 2010

* Domestic violence officer to assist Coroner Courier Mail, 24 Nov 2010
* Family deaths review urged The Daily Telegraph, 29 May 2010

More related coverage
Related Searches

* Elizabeth Broderick,
* Queensland Centre,
* Violence Crisis Service,
* South Australia,
* Violence Death Review Coalition,
* Heather Nancarrow,
* Federal Government,
* Discrimination Commissioner Elizabeth Broderick,
* White Ribbon Day,
* Family Violence Research
0

#6 User is offline   hukildaspida 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Member
  • Posts: 3353
  • Joined: 24-August 07

Posted 14 March 2011 - 05:04 PM

http://www.austdvcle...eport%20WEB.pdf

http://www.austdvcle...se.unsw.edu.au/

http://www.unsw.edu....g_security.html


University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia


UNSW Home > Media, News & Events
Seeking security from domestic violence

11th March 2011

Rochelle Braaf and Isobelle Barrett-Meyering

The significant impact of domestic violence on women’s security and safety has been highlighted in a national report by UNSW researchers, launched by Sex Discrimination Commissioner, Elizabeth Broderick.

A new national report by UNSW researchers has highlighted the significant impact domestic violence has on women’s financial security and safety.

Seeking Security: promoting women’s economic wellbeing following domestic violence was launched by Sex Discrimination Commissioner, Elizabeth Broderick, at UNSW this week.

Researchers, Dr Rochelle Braaf and Isobelle Barrett-Meyering, from UNSW’s Australian Domestic & Family Violence Clearinghouse, interviewed victims of domestic violence and service providers for the report.


Sex Discrimination Commissioner, Elizabeth Broderick

“This is the first Australian study to build a holistic picture of the impact of abusive men’s behaviour on women’s financial security, both during the relationship and post-separation,” said Dr Braaf.

An estimated 15-17 per cent of Australian women are affected by domestic violence over the course of their lifetime, with an economic cost of around $13.6 billion to the Australian community.

The key finding of this research is that financial issues impact on women’s safety.

“Can she afford to leave, afford to change the locks, afford treatment for injuries? Many women are forced to leave their jobs, their homes and their support networks to flee violence. The worst case scenario is when women return to violent men because they can’t survive financially on their own,” Dr Braaf said.

Dr Braaf believes men need to be made more accountable for their abuse and it’s impact on women’s financial outcomes.

“They need to accountable for their share of debts, bills and child support payments and the criminal justice system needs to make them accountable for their abusive behaviour. We heard stories from many women about their ex-partners continuing to make vexatious court claims, costing women in lost work days, child care and legal costs – it’s a way for men to maintain control,” Dr Braaf said.

The report recommends that social security, legal systems, employers and financial institutions all be more responsive to women’s financial needs.

“For example, victim compensation should offer financial relief but is chronically underused by women experiencing domestic violence. The report makes recommendations to improve access to this avenue of justice for women,” said Barrett Meyering.

The report emphasises the importance of key services and employers developing strategies that promote women’s economic empowerment by building their financial capacity and creating economic opportunities.

Women want economic empowerment, Dr Braaf said. “Women want to be financially independent and secure, they are desperate to recover from their experiences and they need support to do that.”

If you or someone you know is in danger, call:

National Confidential Helpline: 1800 200 526
Men's helpline: 1300 78 99 78

Media contact: Fran Strachan | [email protected] | 9385 8732 | 0429 416 070

UNSW Sydney NSW 2052 Australia Telephone +61 2 9385 1000

Authorised by Director of Communications, UNSW, UNSW CRICOS Provider Code 00098G ABN 57 195 873 179

Page last updated: Friday 11 March 2011
0

#7 User is offline   hukildaspida 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Member
  • Posts: 3353
  • Joined: 24-August 07

Posted 05 November 2012 - 08:22 PM

http://www.smh.com.a...1026-28b1w.html

Paid domestic violence leave setting a world standard

Date
October 27, 2012

Ben Schneiders

Read more: http://www.smh.com.a...l#ixzz2BKhSHoPy

http://images.smh.co...ce2-620x349.jpg

AS MANY as 700,000 Australian workers now have access to paid domestic violence leave and many more are poised to get it. The world-first workplace initiative is attracting keen interest from overseas and is set to be embraced in Europe and North America.


The rapid expansion in paid family violence leave in Australia has taken a mere two years since the first agreement was signed at Victoria's Surf Coast Shire Council in Torquay. That deal provided an extra 20 days a year of paid leave in what was the world's most progressive workplace deal on family violence.

Since then dozens of agreements have been signed across Australia covering about 7 per cent of the national workforce with some deals even including unlimited access to paid leave.

Unions and activists are pushing to extend it further and to have paid family violence leave made a universal workplace right.


The anti-family violence campaigner Ludo McFerran, who has been behind the push, has been meeting unions and activists from Europe and Canada to discuss the issue and said there had been strong interest in pursuing it in the coming years.

''Australia is being applauded internationally,'' she said. ''[Australia is] very much seen as being at the cutting edge of this issue.''

The NSW public service, more than 20 Victorian councils, and the big private-sector employer Queensland Rail have agreed to the paid leave.

It is so far mostly found in local government or the public sector but Ms McFerran said more private sector agreements were imminent.

Ms McFerran, who heads the Safe at Home, Safe at Work project at the University of NSW, said since the ACTU Congress endorsed the push in midyear ''more and more unions are putting it automatically into a log of claims''.

Family violence leave typically allows victims to access flexible hours, paid days off or to even have their email address or phone number changed to escape harassment. It requires training of a manager in family violence and privacy issues so victims can be referred to support services.

Paid work is regarded as important in helping victims escape violent relationships as it is a source of financial and emotional independence from abuse.

The campaigner Phil Cleary believes his sister Vicki may have lived if her work had an agreement on family violence. In 1987, Vicki was stabbed to death by her former boyfriend outside the Melbourne kindergarten where she worked.

''My sister was murdered parking her car, outside her place of work, by someone [Peter Keogh] who had been there before in a threatening manner,'' he said. ''At the time people thought it was private business.''

The Workplace Relations Minister, Bill Shorten, commended the employers that had signed up to the leave.

''It is pleasing that where society silently ignored domestic violence, we are increasingly willing to speak out against its perpetrators and support its victims. This should extend to the workplace,''
he said.

''If you don't oppose domestic violence and support women, then you are part of the problem.''

The Australian Law Reform Commission this year recommended the federal government consider whether paid leave be included as a right in the national employment standards, the workplace safety net.

While the ACTU backs this, neither of the major parties nor employer groups does so far.

Read more: http://www.smh.com.a...l#ixzz2BKhjNMfK

Please remember it is equally as distressing & challenging for those who are subjected to the same conduct from the same perpetrators who they
go onto target & become victims of their unsolicited & unlawful acts that are covered under the provisions of Apprehended Personal
Violence Orders (APVO)
in Australia (in NZ the Harassment Act)


ADVOs and APVOs
http://www.lawlink.n...vos_and_apvos#2

Apprehended Violence Orders
http://www.lawlink.n...s/lawassist_avo


Those people effected in a parallel way should be equally entitled to equal assistance & rights.

Harassment Law And Acc Discussion/Resources & Should ACC provide for this?
http://accforum.org/...nt-law-and-acc/
0

#8 User is offline   hukildaspida 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Member
  • Posts: 3353
  • Joined: 24-August 07

Posted 05 November 2012 - 08:41 PM

Click on the link to see what videos are available on Domestic Violence related matters.

http://tv.unsw.edu.a...73E0050568336DC

Australian Domestic and Family Violence Clearinghouse
Sort by:
Grid View Selected Click for List View

Summary
Collections (0)
Videos (13)
MP3s (0)
PDFs (0)

Collections (0)

MP3s (0)
Videos (13)

Addressing ‘the ultimate insult’: Responding to women experiencing intimate partner sexual violence
Victim-centred crisis care and integrated service provision: Tensions, possibilities, challenges
Woman centred responses to intimate partner sexual violence: From research to practice
Domestic and family violence death reviews and the Victorian experience
Can institutional and legislative change make the world safer for victims of domestic violence? A Canadian view

Go to the Videos tab to see all items.
0

Share this topic:


Page 1 of 1
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

1 User(s) are reading this topic
0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users