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#1 User is offline   #y0 

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  Posted 10 July 2008 - 05:03 PM

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#2 User is offline   doppelganger 

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Posted 10 July 2008 - 05:55 PM

they won't dig too deep as this would also mean that any futuer loss of earnings will need to be paid out.


ACC digging another ho;e to fill with <CRAP>
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#3 User is offline   BLURB 

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Posted 10 July 2008 - 06:25 PM

I'm a bit disappointed that ACC chose to make a public comment concerning the young lady in question.

Am I right in saying that they have breached her privacy in this matter?
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#4 User is offline   doppelganger 

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Posted 10 July 2008 - 06:27 PM

View Postboho refugee, on Jul 10 2008, 06:08 PM, said:

well dopple I know that it would be interesting to see if ACC funded any trauma counselling involved for this victims Kirstine Dunne-Powell's recovery if needed - and if she was helped with these issues - then whether or not if ACC will be invoiced for the charges or other expenses likely involved ie esp if they are undertaking a fraud review etc

Certainly imho knowing some assault victims from both physical and sexual violence by strangers or workmates &/or child victims from paedophiles - rather than former/current abusive partners - earnings and loss of them let alone any help from ACC is rarely accessed or granted :(


and that is why I am saying that they are digging a hole to fill with <CRAP>

just think If ACC do do what they say then they can not bring charges against Veitch or any one else as it is a no fault system. Ms Dunne - Powell may not want to deal with the police or ACC as there practices may cause more problems than it fixes. ACC again liable.
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#5 User is offline   Alan Thomas 

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Posted 10 July 2008 - 07:32 PM

ACC are vehemently opposed any forms of privatisation including the victims making payment for pain and suffering, social rehabilitation etc etc.

Personally I think assault is a crime worthy of punishment and that the victim is not the person who determines what punishment fits the crime
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#6 User is offline   BLURB 

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  Posted 09 August 2008 - 11:59 AM

An ACC spokesman said yesterday that the organisation had investigated Ms Dunne-Powell's claim and discovered it was "quite clear there was no reason to look further".

"We did have accurate information. There was no dishonesty."


I always thought ACC had a policy not to discus individual cases
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#7 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 09 May 2016 - 05:03 PM

I wish my daughter was not forever connected to Tony Veitch stuff nation

STEVE DUNNE

Last updated 07:44, May 9 2016


http://www.stuff.co....-to-Tony-Veitch



Tony Veitch talks to media after appearing in the Auckland District Court in 2009.

On Sunday an article written by sports broadcaster Tony Veitch was published by his employer NZME, where he said he made a "huge mistake" in assaulting Kristen Dunne-Powell in 2006.

This is Kristin Dunne-Powell's father Steve Dunne's response to that article.

In the 10 years since Tony Veitch broke my daughter's back, she has rebuilt her life completely.

We are immensely proud of her resilience and the person she is.

We do not dwell in the past and we have followed her lead in moving past this.

READ MORE:
* Tony Veitch speaks out, acknowledges domestic abuse of former partner Kristin Dunne-Powell
* Tony Veitch apologises for 'stupid' Facebook post
* Social media attacks on Tony Veitch 'opportunistic'
* We need to make it easier for domestic violence victims to speak out
* Tony Veitch police file released





However, I wish she was not forever more connected to this man.


I have witnessed her pain again today, on what should be a special day for her and our family.

The constant reminders of this public case also haunt her as she attempts to go happily about her daily life.

So, as Tony puts our case back into the public arena, our family question what do we do?

Stay silent, and just let it go ... say nothing. Is that the best way I can protect my daughter and other women in abusive relationships?

New Zealand Herald's own editorial tells us not to do this.

"Silence can too easily be misinterpreted as condoning the act. More often, silence will be hiding the hearer's utter disgust". So the New Zealand Herald allowing Mr Veitch's self serving propaganda (again) astounds us.

And positioning him as part of the solution is an insult to all true victims of this tragic issue.

If this "apology" showed genuine remorse, it would have been given privately to our daughter.

She has never received one. So who gains from this public "apology"? And actually is it an apology at all? Tony, to atone for your actions, you must stand in the complete truth.

This was no one-off, as you still attempt to mislead the New Zealand public to believe.

The other charges were never presented to the court, but they remain evidence of your systematic abusive pattern. In those files lies a very inconvenient truth for you.

Through Kristin's charitable work we have met many former perpetrators of violence who are now White Ribbon ambassadors and I encourage you Tony to seek their help and support, so you may genuinely and deeply face your abusive actions, with integrity. And truth.

WHERE TO GET HELP

• Women's refuge crisisline: 0800 733 843

• Lifeline (open 24/7): 0800 543 354

• Depression Helpline (open 24/7): 0800 111 757

• Samaritans (open 24/7): 0800 726 666

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#8 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 09 May 2016 - 05:06 PM

Kristin Dunne-Powell's father speaks out on Tony Veitch column

Last updated 22:42, May 8 2016

http://www.stuff.co....tin-dunnepowell



Broadcaster Tony Veitch talks to the media after appearing in the Auckland District court in 2009.

The father of the woman who was attacked by Tony Veitch, has responded to a column written by the broadcaster, calling it self-serving propaganda.

On Sunday a piece written by Veitch was published by his employer NZME, where he said he made a "huge mistake" in abusing Kristen Dunne-Powell in 2006.

In a column published by his employer, NZME, on Sunday, Veitch says there was "no justifiable answer" for his actions, as he acknowledged his wrong-doing.

"It is 10 years since I turned from the man I'd always wanted to be, to a man I could not control," he wrote in the column.

In response Dunne-Powell's father Steve Dunne said in a statement that in the 10 years since Tony Veitch had broken his daughter's back, she had rebuilt her life completely.

"However, I wish she was not forever more connected to this man. I have witnessed her pain again today, on what should be a special day for her and our family.

The constant reminders of this public case also haunt her as she attempts to go happily about her daily life," Dunne wrote.

If this "apology" showed genuine remorse, it would have been given privately to our daughter.

She has never received one. So who gains from this public "apology"? And actually is it an apology at all? Tony, to atone for your actions, you must stand in the complete truth.

READ MORE:
* I wish my daughter was not forever connected to Tony Veitch
* Tony Veitch apologises for 'stupid' Facebook post
* Social media attacks on Tony Veitch 'opportunistic'
* We need to make it easier for domestic violence victims to speak out
* Tony Veitch police file released


"In January 2006 I made a huge mistake, a grave misjudgment on my behalf that has impacted the lives of many people and for that I am truly sorry.

"Even though it was the only time that I have ever lashed out in my life, once was too much. I should have walked away, but instead I hurt someone and I can't ever make that go away.

"I have spent hours alone and in counselling sessions considering my actions that night and wondering why I ever allowed myself to get to that point."

"Poor judgment on my behalf changed so much that day and I apologise unreservedly for that. I live with what I did every day and as a result of my role in media, I live with it everywhere.

"My story is public and while that's hard personally, maybe it is a good thing. Perhaps somewhere it might help someone else make a better decision. Hopefully it can be a small part of the process of educating New Zealanders that family violence is not okay.

"To think of myself as a component of New Zealand's horrendous family violence statistics is appalling to me. I have embarrassed my family, my Mum and Dad who taught me right from wrong and who taught me to be a good person."

White Ribbon campaign manager Rob McCann said Veitch should be focusing on apologising directly to Kristin Dunne-Powell – not on the toll the incident took on himself.

The organisation supported ambassadors who were formerly domestic violence perpetrators themselves, and who had reformed and gone on to educate other men, he said.

Part of that process was acknowledging the blame for violence lay within, not with the target of their abuse: "We don't expect them to change in a vaccuum."

He said Veitch's column by comparison read like it was written to to protect his own image – and spent some column inches detailing his guilt over the "one singular act".

McCann pointed out it had been reported previously the police file painted a different picture to Veitch's version of events.

"It's great that he's apologised but from an outsider's point of view it looks like a PR apology. It looks like the apology you make when you're not really apologising for the things you've done."

McCann added: "If you want to make apologies and send a message you should apologise to the person you've hurt, to your former partner – not talking about the toll it's taken on yourself."

Veitch goes on to claim in the column he is a changed person, he now doesn't "live to work", and while "misinformation continues" around what actually happened, coming to terms with people's judgment of him had been a "huge part of my recovery".

"In 2009 I pleaded guilty to one singular act which Judge Doogue said was not planned and that I was not a serial offender. I was sentenced to nine months' supervision, 300 hours of community service and received a fine. Regardless, 10 years on from that misjudgment, I know and accept it will always be part of who I am.

"Regaining my career has been the toughest challenge of my life. I know there are those of you who believe I don't deserve it. I get it. Fortunately I have met some incredible Kiwis who have helped me find some inner peace to grow, live my life once more and to be a better person."

He said some people would call him a "coward" for trying to take his life, but "I have also learned until you are in that position you shouldn't judge because no one knows how you feel but you".

"Every day what I have done casts a shadow over my future; when I walk into restaurants or my local service station of course I wonder what people are thinking when they look at me.

Perhaps I will never be free from being associated with family violence. I have accepted what I did was wrong and I reiterate there is no excuse for what I did."

WHERE TO GET HELP

• Women's refuge crisisline: 0800 733 843

• Lifeline (open 24/7): 0800 543 354

• Depression Helpline (open 24/7): 0800 111 757

• Samaritans (open 24/7): 0800 726 666



Sign up to receive our new evening newsletter Two Minutes of Stuff – the news, but different.

- Stuff
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