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Investigation. Cpanz It is time we had a look at the CPANZ

#21 User is offline   doppelganger 

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Posted 04 April 2004 - 08:48 PM

Jocko, agree with you that everyone is capable of doin somrthing , but is it economical to do that something. when t comes to working to suport a family this is the question that must be asked

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#22 User is offline   jocko 

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Posted 05 April 2004 - 09:34 AM

Morning Doppelganger, If you look at the economics of someone who is permanently disabled supporting themselves and a family. Then the chances are not good. Unless there are exceptional circumstances and the disabled person can find a niche that provides for their future. Your own case is a glaring example of ACC rehabilitation. You are severely penalised for helping yourself. ACC drives your employer nuts with letters and investigations until they get rid of you and ACC can finish you off with EXIT. As in my case, there is no encouragement or assistance to help you in to work. ACC has no interest in getting us in to work
ACC rehabilitation plans, assessments and programs are solely aimed at proving, in a manner which will provide a defencible decision, you can work. The programs, like the one that is drawing attention at present are there to fulfil the ACC version of comprehensive rehabilitation with their usual scant homage to the act. IOA>IMA>Work Ready Program>Work Trial>Letter stating you are fit for work and your ERC will cease in 3 months. There is something a lot of older policy holders are unaware of. The percentage of disability for section 78 lump sum awards is in the shedules at the back of the 1982 act. The assessed percentage was what you were awarded. i.e. 100% the maximum $17,000 or 10% $1740. The bit people are not all aware of is it was also your assessed permanent rate of impairment. If you had an impairment rate of plus 15% then you had less than 85% capacity for work and were entitled to permanent disability compensation or rehabilitation to restore you to your fullest mental, social and economic usefulness. You and I have fulfilled our obligations under the 1982 act and been destroyed in every way by the EXIT orientated 1998 and 2001 acts, cheers jocko
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#23 User is offline   doppelganger 

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Posted 05 April 2004 - 11:17 PM

I have had the 15% imparment rate and the condition had stablised the review for a section 114 (no decision to th ereview) and have never received the rehabilitation so they could give the correct entitlement.

the corporatio took the part payment off me in 1992 (only started paying the part payment in 1988 and not 1981 when they should have) after claiming that i wasn't reporting to them, and by claiming that i did not want to work even when I had placed a rehabilitation plan in front of them so I could earn the maximium capacity.

since 1996 the high court decision I have been asking them why havn't I got the rehabilitation requested so the compensation under 114 can be worked out.

The corporation is still telling the courts that compensation was paid between July 81 tp 1987 and full make up compensation was paid to 1992. at least now they are not claiming that I did not want to work.

Of cause a lot of this could been sorted out if Mr McDonald was not receiving the claimed bonus. ne would not have made a alagation to the police that I placed on th eintrenet a receipty for making a bomb. of cause all of us that went to school know this. The arest and charge was done to stop me attending the review because no investigation was done. Mr Finlay jumped to comclusions in claiming that the review was to open the file. the review was to expose the lies in the file and take criminal action against the Claim managers in my file.

these Case Managers deliberately lied in the file and them to the courts for a reason. My suggestion would be for money. I know that bonuses were paid to managers as the staff of ACC went to the media when (some ) staff were excluded from the bonuses.

it is past time that an audit was done on the cost of each branch to run. then we should conpare that with there wages. this will show if the corporation staff are being paid bonuses on the Exit rate or good administration.

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#24 User is offline   Down 

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Posted 06 April 2004 - 10:36 AM

Guide To Investment Ratings
Smith Barney's stock recommendations include a risk rating and an investment rating.
Risk ratings, which take into account both price volatility and fundamental criteria, are: Low [L], Medium [M], High [H], and Speculative [S].
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For securities in developed markets (US, UK, Europe, Japan, and Australia/New Zealand), investment ratings are: Buy [1] (expected total return of 10% or more for Low-Risk stocks, 15% or more for Medium-Risk stocks, 20% or more for High-Risk stocks, and 35% or more for Speculative stocks); Hold [2] (0%-10% for Low-Risk stocks, 0%-15% for Medium-Risk stocks, 0%-20% for High-Risk stocks, and 0%-35% for Speculative stocks); and Sell [3] (negative total return).
Investment ratings are determined by the ranges described above at the time of initiation of coverage, a change in risk rating, or a change in target price. At other times, the expected total returns may fall outside of these ranges because of price movement and/or volatility. Such interim deviations from specified ranges will be permitted but will become subject to review by Research Management. Your decision to buy or sell a security should be based upon your personal investment objectives and should be made only after evaluating the stock's expected performance and risk.

http://www.smithbarn...laimer/AFC.html
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#25 User is offline   bruce 

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Posted 08 April 2004 - 11:14 PM

Sigurd

Quote

ACC does not want to be identified as a disability service provider because then it would have to comply with the HDC code of rights


The disability label is more powerful than that. The Bill of Rights prohibits discrimination against disabled. While Parliament is not bound by the BoR it has by convention chosen always to comply with it and rescinds legislation that breaches the BoR.

This is one of the very rare possible ways a NZ Court could rule that the ACC legislation was illegal, the convention is that Courts will not question Legislation and the BoR offers a rare exception to that rule.

But it all hinges on the definition in law of disabled. The BoR has no formal definition but it has a longer history in other countries so Court judgements overseas might be where the meaning of disabled has been established.

More modern laws are likely to include their own particular definition of Disabled that suits the purpose of that particular law. It may be only the BoR definition that matters but any HDC definition would be seen as closely related. The HDC is a modern spin on the BoR.

I often feel some of the hurdles in the ACC Act that are designed to deny claims are a violation of natural justice, and a breach of rights and the Court should be able to tell the Govt it has been unfair and discriminatory in its legislation.

This might be best approached on a case by case basis, start with someone who is undoubtedly disabled, like in a wheelchair and then work towards lesser disabilities. It only needs one person in a wheelchair to take the first case to court disputing some part of the ACC Act that has been used to deny them some right under law. eg the loss of the right to sue can only be fairly justified when ACC does pay up, but when ACC says you dont qualify then you should automatically get back the right to sue the employer. That may not be a very useful example, it needs more thought.

Another option is that all proposed legislation now gets vetted by the Justice Dept for BoR violations before it is passed into law. This offers the possibility of a High Court review of that decision, trouble is the ruling you get is limited to telling the Justice Dept to have another look at their faulty decison.

Where do you get informed opinions on this stuff without spending big bucks on a lawyer?

Another thought is that the total payment made under ACC should never be less than would have been obtained by sueing, since that would be the Govt discriminating againt disabled. Hell the outcome of that would be the end of the ACC scheme coz levies would skyrocket. A further thought is that where a claimant dies prematurely, the relies should get a lump sum making up the lost compo to the bulk sum that would have been got from sueing. When a person gets exited into work (or a benefit) again they should not have recieved any less than if they had sued.
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#26 User is offline   bruce 

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Posted 08 April 2004 - 11:34 PM

A further thought for those that have been denied compo on the grounds that they have failed to prove that their industry as a whole has a problem with that type of injury. An example might be solvent or gluteraldehyde exposure.

This barrier would not exist if you still had the right to sue, it has been added into the ACC Act otherwise the Court would never consider requiring a claimant to prove that all similar employers were neglegent, they only have to prove their own employer was careless.

It is one dirty filthy piece of unfair unlawful discrimination as you will ever find.
We have some sick bastards for politicians.

You would still have to prove that your injury arose in the workplace and that safeguards were inadequate rather that you being reckless.

You also have to be disabled as far as the BoR is concerned.
Lacking an ordinary degree of ability might be one definiton of disability.
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#27 User is offline   jocko 

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Posted 09 April 2004 - 05:30 AM

From the time of the 1987 crash ACC went in to corporate mode. In 1992 Bill Birch stole the insurance scheme that was ACC and turned it in to an insurance scam.Since then the Corporation has been used to keep big business afloat with it's investments,spent millions on advertising and promoting itself, and now provides a hog trough for an army of il-qualified parasites posing as rehabilitation service providers. When is this farce called Rehabilitation going to be stopped? We can prove with absolute certainty that it is a contrived front to cover for the exit programme. A defencible means of appearing to be providing comprehensive rehabilitation and re training.
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#28 User is offline   flowers 

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Posted 28 June 2004 - 09:43 AM

One wonders what the membership of this organisation thinks about recent changes that have been made with relation to medical misadventure in the light of the fines and penalties being applied in other areas of business if they are found responsible especiall if they are following ACC best practice initiatives regarding back pain ond others.
Will they get fine if the practitioner is following ACC guidelines and the patient suffers because of it.
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#29 User is offline   jocko 

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Posted 18 September 2004 - 10:23 AM

And what is in a name? ACC act 2001 section 322
(1) The Governor general may, on the recommendation of the MINISTER, by order in council, make regulations........ (f) Adding an occupational group, or part of an occupational group, to the definition of TREATMENT PROVIDER in Section 6(1) and DEFINING THAT GROUP, OR PART, BY REFERENCE TO MEMBERSHIP OF OR REGISTRATION WITH A PARTICULAR BODY IN SOME WAY.
It is obvious this outfit is a scam to provide some letters after the names of totally unqualified vocational assessors. AND TOTALLY UNQUALIFIED TUTORS AND EDUCATION SERVICE PROVIDERS. THAT HAD BUILT THE OVERSEAS STUDENT INDUSTRY IN TO A 2 BILLION DOLLAR SCAM PROVIDING COURSES FOR RIDICULOUS JOB OPTIONS THAT MOSTLY DID NOT EXIST. Providing the students with worthless qualifications. What was the name of the sheila that was caught dishing out the degrees from the universities recently? Is she on the cpanz list preceding any where?
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#30 User is offline   doppelganger 

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Posted 18 September 2004 - 06:38 PM

as far as I can see that section 322 is that there is a right to change to the definitions under section 6. section 323 is to change for work related gradual process, 324 is regulations relating to rehabilitation 325 is to changes to regulations relating to ancilary services to rehabilitation (his is the part that was used to change who does rehabilitation to get CPANZ to do there little tricks) , ect.

these regulations tell us how and what we can do to change the Act. There is no need to look at this unless you are looking at going outside the boundries of the Act.

think that the defination for treatment provider could exclude the CPANZ, but when rehabilitation is to be supplied it has to be cost efficent. the CPANZ is not cost efficent and therfore should not be used for rehabilitation.
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#31 User is offline   jocko 

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Posted 20 September 2004 - 11:42 PM

Secure risk mnagement. What I am saying Doppel is because acc were running around using truck drivers as vocational assessors and bogus tutors without qualifications were ripping off international students with courses that were about as useful for employment as standing in a paddock mooing is for voc rehab.
Some bright spark came up with the idea of the CPANZ as a title to cover their respective arses. So instead of Nigel Philpotty. HT. You have Nigel Fullpot, CPANZ.
If you are an unknowing claimant or an overseas student it actually looks quite flash. It takes money and organisation to set up something like this. Who is behind it, how did it eventuate and what are the real qualifications of its members, apart from being a member, demands answers? Especially bearing in mind its oh so close relationship with ACC via funding and the ACC Chief executives wife being involved with it?
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#32 User is offline   Britts 

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Posted 26 September 2004 - 10:11 PM

From CPANZ site

interesting read, this is in it too :)

Posted Image

Attached File(s)


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#33 User is offline   Britts 

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Posted 26 September 2004 - 10:15 PM

CPANZ... working the injured client process

Attached File(s)


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#34 Guest_IDB_*

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Posted 27 September 2004 - 11:09 PM

this turned up from a file called InfolinkOverview.PDF


E-Government Case Study


The Client
The Accident Compensation Corporation (ACC) administers the accident insurance
scheme for New Zealanders and visitors to New Zealand. 1.6 million claims were
accepted by the ACC in the year to June 2001, leading to payments of almost $1.3
billion for compensation, rehabilitation and medical treatment.

The Client’s Challenges
* ACC receives a large volume of claim entitlement forms that require processing,
from a wide range of health providers such as doctors and physiotherapists. To
manage this claim process, ACC has developed their own system to enable
health providers to lodge claims electronically (ACC e-Claim System). Their
ultimate aim is to get all health providers to use this system.

* Before health providers are able to electronically lodge claims, a process is
undertaken to ensure all required technical and procedural requirements are
completed.

* The task of ensuring that the many health providers completed these
requirements was paper based and required significant resources. It was very
difficult to track each health provider and ensure that they were not overlooked in
the process.

The Solution

The Viibe SIMPS (Sales & Implementation System) application developed
exclusively for ACC has streamlined and transformed the process of bringing health
providers onto the ACC e-Claim System. The key features of the application are:
* Effective management of sales and installation process for the e-Claim System
* Better management of ACC’s “suspects and prospects” health provider database
* Vastly improved delivery of Customer Relationship Management (CRM) facilities,
including automated Email
* Increased transparency in the process of loading health providers onto the e-Claim
System
* Improved and simplified interaction between the ACC, the health providers and
the technology vendors

Attached File(s)


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#35 User is offline   flowers 

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Posted 17 January 2005 - 05:16 PM

And what the hell are Baycorp doing in there???????
Is this another Miserymaker link to finish off those clients they have robbed blind and ended up in debt because ACC has stolen their Income????
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#36 User is offline   Juscallin1 

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Posted 17 January 2005 - 08:32 PM

;) Flowers, Baycorp are involved in a lot of things! Beware of the small print.ave you ever read the small print on an application for a Woollies One Card???

The information is passed to
Baycorp. And you give all your credit and other details on your application. Great ,Baycorp have it all.

Well, they havent got mine. Would rather pass over a bargain than let them into my cheque A/c number etc!!!!!!!

We just do not know how wide this corrupt ACC net is!!!
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#37 User is offline   greg 

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Posted 19 February 2005 - 07:32 AM

Is this not what the ACT. party is claiming the Te Wananga

is doing in Parliament under privilage.

Am I correct to remember some previous Chief Excetives have
also been jailed and put to trial for fraud for suppling very special
contracts that are not out to tender.

Seems time to remind the media of these facts.

Wonder how far the ACT. party really want to open this up as most
have some skeletons in their cupboard, benifit paid on a block of land he owned
to workers now MR Shirley.comes to mind.
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#38 User is offline   MadMac 

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Posted 20 November 2006 - 06:53 PM

:wub:
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#39 User is offline   doppelganger 

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Posted 21 December 2008 - 05:22 PM

well it time that this orginisation had a new lease on life.

No Qualification then get a job as a career practitioners
these are the people that ACC employ to make sure that we all end up in employment.

Maturing industry raises its sights
While New Zealand career practitioners exhibit a high degree of professionalism, the career practice industry as a whole has some way to go to attain the status and recognition of a profession.

This is the view of Russell Booth, president of the Career Practitioners Association of New Zealand (CPANZ). CPANZ has been consulting widely with its 550 members about possible moves to lift entry and practice requirements for CPANZ members. It is estimated that CPANZ membership might make up 50% of the industry.

"I'd like to think that all members of CPANZ exhibit a high degree of professionalism in their commitment and empathy with clients. Nevertheless we do lack formal, specialised entry qualifications, which are a feature of most professions.

"So there is an important debate going on within CPANZ about how quickly we want to go down that track. The approach since CPANZ was formed in 1997 has been very inclusive, with a strong focus on people having career practice experience. Perhaps only a quarter of our membership would have a career-specific qualification.

"Introducing more stringent entry criteria would mean a more exclusive approach; that's something that the industry needs to debate. Are we ready for that yet? Do we move there in one step or do we take a more incremental approach? How bold do we want to be?

As part of the move to greater professionalism, CPANZ is also considering introducing a competency framework that will set universally accepted standards for career practice and knowledge. The framework would help people benchmark themselves against those standards.

Russell says an important challenge for the industry is to provide a range of professional development opportunities, so that practitioners can address any areas which may need attention.

"This is a difficult assignment. However, in an industry as young as ours where there are only two providers of career-specific qualifications and the number of practitioners with advanced qualifications are relatively small. CPANZ would like to encourage greater use of visiting career experts and we would like to find ways of exchanging insights and ideas with our overseas counterparts."

Finding ways to support career-specific research in New Zealand is also part of the move to greater professionalism, says Russell Booth.

"We need to encourage research, for example, into the kind of cultural factors which influence career decision-making in New Zealand, and the kind of models which New Zealanders use in making career choices. That kind of information would be very useful for career practitioners here. Developing a body of research knowledge is an important dimension of operating as a profession."

Issues around fostering greater professionalism should be seen as a sign of growth and maturity for the still-young career practice industry, says Russell. The debate around the emerging identity of the profession, "around who we are and how we see ourselves," is common to many new industries.

"We need to remember, however, that it's not just a question of self-definition. For society's acceptance, we can't go by self-designation. That's why recognised qualifications and professional development that are linked to acknowledged competency standards are important. These features convey competence and increase the value of the services delivered.

"A high-quality service in turn leads to greater demand. At the end of the day, a paying customer wants to be assured of the quality of practice."

Russell Booth says he expects there will be strong support for a move to greater professionalism but the real question is the speed of the change. He says issues around the availability of training and professional development have to be taken into account as CPANZ moves towards introducing more stringent admission and qualification requirements.

Proposed changes include a ‘sunset' or ‘grandparent' clause for existing professional level members and a transitional clause that enables associate members to move into professional level on existing criteria.

Several discussion papers have been circulated to CPANZ members and meetings held at local branches. It is expected that decisions will be made later in the year. Career Edge will report on the outcome of the consultation.

Disclaimer
The views in this publication are not necessarily those of Career Services or its board. They have been published in the interests of encouraging understanding and debate on career related issues.
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#40 User is offline   doppelganger 

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Posted 21 December 2008 - 05:53 PM

and here is another one
http://wilmorecartag...1/research.html

In pursuit of professionalism

Several new measures being considered by the Career Practitioners Association of New Zealand (CPANZ) would significantly advance the professionalism of the career practice industry in New Zealand, says career academic, Dr Dale Furbish.
The new measures being considered include a requirement for CPANZ professional level members to hold a specific career-related qualification and the development of a competency framework for career practice.
"These proposed steps would represent a significant step for the career practice industry in New Zealand," says Dr Dale Furbish, programme leader of the Graduate Diploma course at Auckland University of Technology.
"When CPANZ was first set up as the professional association for career practitioners in 1997, it was early days for the profession. Career practice was just beginning to emerge as a primary occupational role and those engaged in it were beginning to identify as career practitioners.
"The decision was made at the time to take an inclusive approach to membership. The founding philosophy was to encourage career practitioners from diverse practice settings and with a broad range of qualifications to join the association. This flexible approach meant that a formal qualification, even in an unrelated field, and/or practical experience was sufficient to satisfy the membership criteria."
Some eight years later, the time is right to take the next step to gaining true professional status, says Dale. Inevitably that means moving to a more exclusive environment where only those with career-specific qualifications and the appropriate industry experience would be admitted for professional level membership to CPANZ.
"Right now it's still a pretty open market," says Dale. "People can set up with no CPANZ affiliation or industry-specific qualification. It's not a regulated enterprise."
Dale says that raising membership criteria and identifying clear practice standards and competencies are important steps in career practice operating as a true profession.
"The development of professionalism isn't something which is just declared by a profession. There has to be a broader recognition in society that those practising an occupation have the specialist knowledge that isn't available to anyone."
Career practice competencies are being proposed for three levels – developing, competent and expert. The developing level is the minimum requirement and would cover areas such as career theory, career information and resources, tools and techniques, helping skills and relationship management. These competencies could be addressed in a qualification or as part of the professional development programme.
Competent and expert levels of career practice competencies reflect expertise gained through experience in the field and further professional development. These advanced skills provide career practitioners with a deeper understanding of career practice and result in increased practice effectiveness.
The development of these competency standards are an important part of the maturing of the profession, says Dale.
"It takes us further down the track of assuring consumers and clients, including government, that as a profession we have these competencies and the requisite body of knowledge."
Dale Furbish says that an important challenge for the industry is to broaden understanding of what career practice means.
"As things stand, there is a blurring of what career practitioners offer. Career services are frequently seen as job placement. Clear distinctions among the roles of career practitioners, employment consultants and human resource workers do not exist.
"The defining of core competencies will help the profession forge a clearer identity – it will help consumers distinguish between those providing career information at one end of the spectrum and those who are involved in the therapeutic realm with career counselling at the other. Importantly it will encourage a more holistic approach to career decision-making."
The changing economy and labour market, combined with changing cultural expectations around work, all impact on the career practice industry, says Dale.
"Things have changed a lot in New Zealand society and in the labour market over the last 20 years. There is a growing recognition of the need for people to make better-informed career decisions, and greater expectations, too, that work should be satisfying. At the moment, however, the profession is not really set up to meet the needs of the general public.
"There are still a lot of people who do not understand the broader, holistic meaning of career – often it's a crisis decision about getting a new job. So there's a way to go in educating people about careers."
Career education needs to start at a young age, says Dale Furbish. He believes there is room for a greater focus on career education in the secondary education system.
"We need to encourage a more holistic view of career development and that requires a cohesive, national career education agenda for schools. At the moment it's a ‘bits and pieces' approach. There's been some progress in developing broad guidelines for career education in schools but it's largely left to individual schools to decide how to implement them. There's often not the resource there to implement a meaningful programme."
Disclaimer
The views in this publication are not necessarily those of Career Services or its board. They have been published in the interests of encouraging understanding and debate on career related issues.
Resource:
Internet: yahoo.com and google.com
Posted by wilmorecartagenas at 7:10 PM
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