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What's really in our Food TV3 Tuesday evening - a new series of interest

#1 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 26 June 2008 - 11:50 AM

Some of you may be interested in this program & not be aware it started this week.

Some stuff is old hat but other stuff interesting & worth a watch.
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#2 User is offline   redsquare74ucys 

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  Posted 02 July 2008 - 02:21 PM

F'ride in water has been shown to distrupt thyroid. This makes me think back to something Swami Mutkidahma said about people in the West having problems with their throat chakras - and that he'd never seen anything like that in Asia (!). He made this comment to me waaay back in 2001. The information on fluride has only just come out.

Maungataniwha - You forgot to add 1080 to additives to avoid.
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#3 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 11 September 2009 - 04:39 PM

Great to see Petra & the team back on our TV screens.
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#4 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 01 October 2009 - 03:42 PM

Did anyone watch it this week & see they used a white mouse to test a new purple coloured variation of potato?

Did they try the test on a brown, black & grey mice?

They may well have different blood groups affecting their metabolism etc.

Shameful they still use animals for "Research in NZ at Universities.

Wonder how many they "Murder" every year for Research?
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#5 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 19 March 2010 - 02:45 PM

A list of Food additives can be found on the following link

http://www.nac.aller...ives/index.html
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#6 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 31 May 2010 - 04:50 PM

This is what Europe is doing in relation to food labelling.

http://www.euractiv.com/en/food/food-infor...sdossier-418307
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#7 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 18 June 2010 - 05:38 PM

A new show starting soon.

http://www.tv3.co.nz/TVShows/Reality/Whats...px.Showid=16417
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#8 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 05 August 2010 - 04:51 PM

What really has happened to peanuts?

Once upon a time there was little if any complaints regarding peanut allergies, we have to stop & question if it is the chemical sprays that are being used in the plantations & processes that are undertaken that is in fact causing these "allergies", as opposed to the peanuts themselves...
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#9 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 07 May 2011 - 11:40 PM

New series starting soon...
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#10 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 13 August 2012 - 09:44 PM

http://www.stuff.co....pills-the-beans

Carolyn spills the beans

EMMA PAGE
Last updated 12:05 12/08/2012

SWEET AS: Carolyn Robinson says she's changed her eating habits after some TV3 investigations.


Carolyn Robinson
has learnt a lot from hosting the popular TV3 series What's Really In Our Food?

In fact, the newsreader and mother-of-three reckons it's exactly the type of informative television she'd like to sit down and watch herself - you know, if she wasn't already on it.

"There's an incredible wealth of information in that 30 minutes. It's astonishing how much is in it," she explains.

"So if I wasn't on this programme . . . this would definitely be appointment viewing for me."

However, she adds in a sweet admission: "I probably won't watch it because it's just totally embarrassing to watch yourself on television."

This is the fourth season of the series and second that Carolyn has hosted. This year the show keeps to its roots, exploring the science and busting the myths behind the food we eat, with a focus on traditional "Kiwi" meals.

The following items all go under the microscope: fish and chips, roast lamb, curry, burgers, salads, milk and the humble pie.

Burgers take pride of place in the first episode, which airs on Tuesday night, as Carolyn and the team visit a factory that makes meat patties for a leading fast-food joint and settle, once and for all, the claim that a McDonald's hamburger, left to its own devices, will never decompose.

Carolyn believes the show appeals to audiences because it addresses the kind of things that people really want - and need - to know about the food they consume but don't necessarily have the time, resources or ability to find out for themselves.

"I think everybody cares about this sort of thing but we're all so busy - we're time poor. There's a lot of pressure on you, especially if you're a parent, that you have to get it right, you have to feed your children the right food . . . and sometimes that's really hard to do . . . I know I've always felt under a lot of pressure to make sure they are getting what they need at all times. So a show like this, it's 30 minutes; you can sit down and are told all this great information."

There are, she says, "definitely some big revelations in this series".

And yes, the cooking and baking enthusiast learns a lot herself, too. Without wanting to give too much away, the standout or most surprising moments for her personally come in the episodes about milk.

"I've learnt in that episode about things you wouldn't think would be issues" - and lamb - "there are stunning things on that as well".

The impact of the knowledge she gains influences how she shops and what she eats.

She is more vigilant about reading ingredient and nutrition panels now.

And since the pork episode last season, she has, because of animal welfare concerns, stopped eating the meat altogether - although she buys free-range ham for the kids.

"We did pies this time round," she adds with a smile in her voice. "And I'm totally good with pies. I can eat pies forever. Pies are fine."

Putting the show together can be hard work with long hours, including a nine-hour van ride in Vietnam, where the team went to investigate fish.

It was also hard being away from her children - aged 10, 7 and 4 - on that trip. The week was the longest she has been apart from them.

But mostly, making the show has been a joy.

"It's been a real privilege to get to bend the ear of some people who are experts in their field and ask them a million questions."

What's Really In Our Food?,

TV3, Tuesday, 7.30pm


http://www.tv3.co.nz...eallyInOur.aspx
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#11 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 10 February 2014 - 12:14 PM

Maybe the producers of the New Zealand "What's really in your food?" should sell the program it made to the UK for it to be screened there.

To our readers from the UK, we say "In this instance, forget the carbon miles (kilometres) and Buy New Zealand made/ grown".


Here's a link to give those interested a heads up.


What's Really in our Food

http://www.tv3.co.nz...yInOurFood.aspx


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Fake-food scandal revealed as tests show third of products mislabelled
Consumers are being sold drinks with banned flame-retardant additives, pork in beef, and fake cheese, laboratory tests show

Felicity Lawrence
*
* The Guardian, Saturday 8 February 2014

http://www.theguardi...cts-mislabelled

Consumers are being sold food including mozzarella that is less than half real cheese, ham on pizzas that is either poultry or "meat emulsion", and frozen prawns that are 50% water, according to tests by a public laboratory.

The checks on hundreds of food samples, which were taken in West Yorkshire, revealed that more than a third were not what they claimed to be, or were mislabelled in some way. Their results have been shared with the Guardian.

Testers also discovered beef mince adulterated with pork or poultry, and even a herbal slimming tea that was neither herb nor tea but glucose powder laced with a withdrawn prescription drug for obesity at 13 times the normal dose.

A third of fruit juices sampled were not what they claimed or had labelling errors. Two contained additives that are not permitted in the EU, including brominated vegetable oil, which is designed for use in flame retardants and linked to behavioural problems in rats at high doses.

Experts said they fear the alarming findings from 38% of 900 sample tests by West Yorkshire councils were representative of the picture nationally, with the public at increasing risk as budgets to detect fake or mislabelled foods plummet.

Counterfeit vodka sold by small shops remains a major problem, with several samples not meeting the percentage of alcohol laid down for the spirit. In one case, tests revealed that the "vodka" had been made not from alcohol derived from agricultural produce, as required, but from isopropanol, used in antifreeze and as an industrial solvent.

Samples were collected both as part of general surveillance of all foods and as part of a programme targeted at categories of foodstuffs where cutting corners is considered more likely.

West Yorkshire's public analyst, Dr Duncan Campbell,
said of the findings: "We are routinely finding problems with more than a third of samples, which is disturbing at a time when the budget for food standards inspection and analysis is being cut."

He said he thought the problems uncovered in his area were representative of the picture in the country as a whole.

The scale of cheating and misrepresentation revealed by the tests was described by Maria Eagle, the shadow environment secretary, as unacceptable. "Consumers deserve to know what they are buying and eating and cracking down on the mislabelling of food must become a greater priority for the government," she said.

A Defra spokesperson said: "There are already robust procedures in places to identify and prevent food fraud and the FSA has increased funding to support local authorities to carry out this work to £2m.

"We will continue to work closely with the food industry, enforcement agencies and across government to improve intelligence on food fraud and clamp down on deliberate attempts to deceive consumers."

Testing food is the responsibility of local authorities and their trading standards departments, but as their budgets have been cut many councils have reduced checks or stopped collecting samples altogether.

The number of samples taken to test whether food being sold matched what was claimed fell nationally by nearly 7% between 2012 and 2013, and had fallen by over 18% in the year before that. About 10% of local authorities did no compositional sampling at all last year, according to the consumer watchdog Which?

West Yorkshire is unusual in retaining a leading public laboratory and maintaining its testing regime. Samples are anonymised for testing by public analysts to prevent bias, so we are unable to see who had made or sold individual products. Many of the samples were collected from fast-food restaurants, independent retailers and wholesalers; some were from larger stores and manufacturers.

Substitution of cheaper ingredients for expensive materials was a recurring problem with meat and dairy products – both sectors that have seen steep price rises on commodity markets. While West Yorkshire found no horsemeat in its tests after the scandal had broken, mince and diced meats regularly contained meat of the wrong species.

In some cases, this was likely to be the result of mincing machines in butcher's shops not being properly cleaned between batches; in others there was clear substitution of cheaper species. Samples of beef contained pork or poultry, or both, and beef was being passed off as more expensive lamb, especially in takeaways, ready meals, and by wholesalers.

Ham, which should be made from the legs of pigs, was regularly made from poultry meat instead: the preservatives and brining process add a pink colour that makes it hard to detect except by laboratory analysis.

Meat emulsion – a mixture in which meat is finely ground along with additives so that fat can be dispersed through it – had also been used in some kinds of ham, as had mechanically separated meat, a slurry produced by removing scraps of meat from bones, which acts as a cheap filler although its use is not permitted in ham.

Levels of salt that breached target limits set by the Food Standards Agency were a recurring problem in sausages and some ethnic restaurant meals. The substitution of cheaper vegetable fat for the dairy fat with which cheese must legally be made was common. Samples of mozzarella turned out in one case to be only 40% dairy fat, and in another only 75%.

Several samples of cheese on pizzas were not in fact cheese as claimed but cheese analogue, made with vegetable oil and additives. It is not illegal to use cheese analogue but it should be properly identified as such.

Using water to adulterate and increase profits was a problem with frozen seafood. A kilo pack of frozen king prawns examined contained large quantities of ice glaze, and on defrosting the prawns themselves were found to be 18% added water. Only half the weight of the pack was seafood as opposed to water.

In some cases the results raised concerns over immediate food safety. The herbal slimming tea that was mostly sugar contained a prescription obesity drug that has been withdrawn because of its side-effects.

Making false promises was a dominant theme among vitamin and mineral supplements. Of 43 samples tested, 88% made health claims that are not allowed under legislation because there is no science to support them or were mislabelled as to their content in some way.

Even when fraud or mislabelling is found, it is not aways followed up. Once it has detected a problem with a product, a council is required to refer it to the home authority in which it was originally made, which may or may not take enforcement action.

Richard Lloyd, executive director of Which?, called for more effective use of resources and tougher penalties.

"No one wants to see another incident like the horsemeat scandal happen again and the rigorous enforcement of standards underpinned by effective levels of food testing is essential for restoring consumers' trust in this industry," he said.

• This article was amended on 8 February to include a Defra comment which had been omitted.
The Observer Food Monthly
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#12 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 24 April 2014 - 02:05 PM

This episode about Saturated fat's health benefits under scrutiny was well worth viewing, & to the ole scientist that was going on about "data & historic research" as a comparison, you sounded just like those that collect http://www.acc.co.nz clients data.

There is nothing wrong with eating some fats, including butter & real milk.
The problem is so many of our foods have been "fiddled" with as a result of "faulty scientific psychobabble" to suit these idiots experiments & theories.

No two people are alike, just like no two people should be given the same prescription drugs without full weight, blood tests etc to see if they may genuinely be the appropriate help.

To say in the earlier days of man & womankind that people died before they were aged around 40 due to diet is nonsensical, many died due to childbirth complications, amongst other things.

It is a well known fact that in historic days, that of over 100 years ago plus, that people also lived well into there 80's


Saturated fat's health benefits under scrutiny

Wednesday 23 Apr 2014 8:30p.m.

Read more: http://www.3news.co....x#ixzz2zlVyJwH1


http://www.3news.co....47/Default.aspx
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#13 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 24 April 2014 - 02:09 PM

To the makers of "What's really in our food", would you please make a program featuring "What's really in our lollies" & where do the ingredients come from.

We personally believe many would stop eating lollies instantly if they knew what was truthfully in them.

It pays to look at what country some of the lollies are made in & think twice about purchasing them or eating them.

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#14 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 12 December 2014 - 11:45 AM

May be it's time for a "What's really in our hospital meals?" series of this program.

Hospital meals

http://accforum.org/...985#entry195985
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