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What?? Injury for sensitive claim assessed at 20%

#1 User is offline   redsquare74ucys 

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  Posted 18 June 2008 - 09:24 AM

Well finally recieved a copy of the report from the assessor. 55% assessed, Overall WPI: 50%, Then apportionment for non-covered factors takes it down to just20%. I'm finding this all really distressing. Fuck I won't even be able to cover what is has cost me so far just to cope and stay alive. Thats $6000?? What a waste of time and stress.

I used to be normal....

Wish I'd never bothered. This hurts more than I can say
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#2 User is offline   Witchiepoo 

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Posted 18 June 2008 - 09:33 AM

what do u mean for apportionment for NON-COVERED factors ? Like what influences that ?
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#3 User is offline   MINI 

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Posted 18 June 2008 - 10:35 AM

Yes Lucy you gotta tell us more than that.

Is it Physical, Mental what exactly.

Do you agree with the non-injury (medical), percentage of it.?

And how come it cost you so much?

Make us understand so we can share with you what we know.

Cheers
Mini
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#4 User is offline   doppelganger 

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Posted 18 June 2008 - 05:15 PM

remember that the Assessor can only make the assesment on the covered injuries The injuries that the ACC are saying are not covered,are injuries that have nothing to do with the covered injury.

Claim managers do not keep a record of injuries and rely on reading medical certificates, medical reports each time the case manager needs to send claimant for assessments.

This is deliberate policy from head office so that entitlements can be removed.
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#5 User is offline   Not Waddie 

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Posted 18 June 2008 - 08:46 PM

Mini, its a sensitive claim.

You can always review the decision. You will need to have a way of showing a flaw in the assessment that led to the deduction of non-injury related factors. Perhaps seek a review outcome that ACC to be directed to get another assessment. Worth a shot, 30% is quite a chunk to deduct.
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#6 User is offline   MINI 

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Posted 19 June 2008 - 09:30 AM

Waddie

Sometimes you can get them to change the apportionment just by producing material/medical reports which show the non-injury is wrong.

Thats the place to start.

But put the Review in anyway just so dont run out of time.

Mini
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#7 User is offline   Medwyn 

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Posted 19 June 2008 - 12:46 PM

View PostNot Waddie, on Jun 18 2008, 08:46 PM, said:

its a sensitive claim.


And as such, one get's hurt and upset really easily and thinks all manner of things, usually caused by panic then anger.

Redsquare74ucys, firstly don't panic or even get angry about it as it will cloud your thinking, get someone you trust talk and walk you through it calmly and try to identify where you think the problem lies.

Don't do this one alone, as it may bring back some unwanted memory or flash, and you do not want to be harmed any more.

Watch the board, Not Waddie, Mini and co are trying to get a handle on this so try to be patient and do not panic.

Attached File(s)


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#8 User is offline   redsquare74ucys 

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  Posted 19 June 2008 - 11:23 PM

Sort of calmer. Sort of. Will reply in parts.

First part: Apportionment for Non-covered Factors

#1) Because my mother humiliated me (actually I consider that part of the sexual abuse considering what occurred - my first memory of humiliation is of my mother taking me to a doctor and insisting on some kind of prescription. Next thing I know we are home and my mother was forcing my legs apart as my stepfather watched from the door - in retrospect I think it was a thrush treatment? I remember her screaming at me that I was filthy and hitting me for trying to close my legs....I was about six or seven) From the assessors report
"in a review of the psychiatric literature by Karlen Lyons-Ruth, borderline personality symptoms are associated with inadequacies in early parent child communication and problems in the family environment. In particular maternal verbal abuse has been associated with markedly higher risk for delveoping borderline personality disorders"
#2 and because of my home life being unstable
"It is well recognised in the psychiatric literature that disrupted attachment and poor maternal parenting and the presence of parental psychopathology are serious adverse developmental factors which negatively impact on children and their later mental health.
These adverse developmental factors are recognised as contributing to childhood anxiety disorders and have a contribution the the aetiology of adult depression."

"...the above factors have contributed to CXXXXXX's mental health problems and impairment and require apportionment of 30%"

Holy fuck! Logically this will mean I would need to be 130% mentally impared before I could even become eligible for the 100% compensation.

THE FLAW IN THE ASSESSMENT: I told the ACC counsellor and ACC psychi (not the doctor who did above %) that I had had treatment using alternative therapies, they asked whether I had had ACC counselling, I said, "no" so they said, "right, so you haven't been treated". (NLP, EFT, Rebirthing/breathword, huna, to name a few). At the time I began I owned a house, so I obtained a revolving credit facility and over the years have paid tens of thousands of dollars towards getting better. Not to mention all the self improvement books from the library and the seminars. All of this occurred before the latest violation/sensitive claim. ACC are assuming that only the treatments they give can make a difference. That's not fair. Before the latest violation I had really turned my life around without ACC. I went to considerable lengths to associated with positive people who were examples of what I wanted to be.

Also the assessor didn't include other events that were in the psych report. She had allocated 13% to 86-87 abuse, and just 7% for the abuse occurring in 2005-2006. She has not allocated anything for my ex partner continually abusing me (sorry hate the r word) over a five year period, an event after I left a nightclub, and another event about a year after that. I guess it doesn't matter much to me anyway, I just got up and got on with my life until the events in 2005-2006 which, quite frankly amounted to mental torture with sex thrown in - I indicated to a therapist that I thought I had transferance and he took advantage of my mental state. Doesn't sound that bad does it? To most of you it won't even sound like a sensitive claim. But it is....absolutely horrific.....can never recover from this.....have lost so much all over again.

7% ???? Surely this cannot be correct. There must be another case that can be compared?? When I had a bad reaction he pulled out my case notes....."it does sound a bit like this...", he pointed out (for those of you who don't know this would cause a client to relive past abuse - the flashbacks are mind breaking). Feel Acc assessment to similar to what he did. Like they are blaming me for reacting like this (well technically they blame me for 30%). He continued to treat me saying that he didn't know what was wrong with me and I got much, much worse. It seemed to me that he got a real kick out of me becoming so dependant upon him - he kept getting really angry at me saying that it was just sex! That was all he wanted. Then he would become seductive and saying that he really cared about me etc.

Eventually I phoned rape crisis because I was nutting out and hadn't slept for God knows how long and I was disorientated, for much of that time I didn't know what day I was in and would obsessively check the time to find out where I was. During this time I was binge eating and I managed to consume about $8K worth of food although some would have been eatin by my kids - I couldn't look after them).

He was using NLP during all of this so how the hell acc or anyone can assess how much damage has been done is beyond me given that I was in a trance state in almost every session. My sexual identity is well and truly screwed up beyond repair. It certainly hasn't been helped by the fact that he utilised past sexual abuse events and core beliefs to convince me that he hadn't done anything wrong. He even quoted Neil Scott Walsh, Coversations with God (I'm very spiritual) the bit about how NSW asked God about sex and God said that man had made it dirty. Yeesh. 7%!

I wanted to put some details here in the hope that someone can make suggestions to do with ACC. You might be able to see a point I can't. Don't care if you assassinate my character won't be worse than what I've already been through so go right ahead and tell me it isn't that bad and that I'm not really scared for life that it is all exagerated and that sex abuse victims get lots of easy $$$. Couldn't give a fuck.
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#9 User is offline   redsquare74ucys 

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  Posted 19 June 2008 - 11:39 PM

Something to think about:

If 13% occurred before 2003 then will that portion will be allocated for an Independance allowance?

If only 7% occurred after 2003 then does that mean that there is no chance for a lump sum since it is under 10%? (not IA in a lump sum)

In other words, I am eligible for a whopping... ??????? a week! Gee, that was worth it! I feel so acknowledged now.

I can't even make use of acc's treatments since they clash with my belief system =metaphysics.....thought creates reality....= I created this, but the therapists acc have patiently tell me that, no. It is his fault then go on to point out why.... it is really insulting and is doing my head in so no way am I going to do that to myself again. I'm better off alone without the "help" of acc.
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#10 User is offline   Gloria Mitchell 

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Posted 20 June 2008 - 12:43 AM

good evening redsquare74ucys.

I am far too far away to be much help or support. However I am sending some metaphysical strength in your direction.

I acknowledge and admire your strength and courage - don't loose that.

I abhor the damage that is done to precious children, teens and adults everywhere.

I know some one will help you, we have some good friends on board here.

Please know you are not alone.

Gloria
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#11 User is offline   Medwyn 

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Posted 20 June 2008 - 06:47 PM

View Postredsquare74ucys, on Jun 19 2008, 11:39 PM, said:

Something to think about:

If 13% occurred before 2003 then will that portion will be allocated for an Independance allowance?

If only 7% occurred after 2003 then does that mean that there is no chance for a lump sum since it is under 10%? (not IA in a lump sum)

In other words, I am eligible for a whopping... ??????? a week! Gee, that was worth it! I feel so acknowledged now.

I can't even make use of acc's treatments since they clash with my belief system =metaphysics.....thought creates reality....= I created this, but the therapists acc have patiently tell me that, no. It is his fault then go on to point out why.... it is really insulting and is doing my head in so no way am I going to do that to myself again. I'm better off alone without the "help" of acc.

can you calarify for me.the position you are in with ACC?

!. What help do you get from ACC?
2 What financial help do you get from ACC?
3 Are ACC funding counselling?
4 Are you participating in that counselling?

With all respect, at the moment you need to focus on what you have, and use that to get what you need, not on what you expect to get. Other's here will provide help and ways, but firstly, you must be safe and in a good space.
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#12 User is offline   Not Waddie 

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Posted 20 June 2008 - 07:33 PM

My feeling is that the way the legislation changed, combined with the method of assessment and the graduated lump sum scale, makes both the independence allowance and lump sum compensation a joke, especially for people who have suffered several injuries in different periods. It is one of the most complained about things.

I would take Medwyn's advice and get yourself right. Money makes life a bit easier but it does not fix your head.

Things to look at in terms of the decision

1. The independence allowance should be backdated to the date to claim for cover of the injury was lodged, but no earlier than 1 July 1992.
2. You can review the decision and argue a flaw in the assessment and seek a direction for another assessment to be done. Mediation may be offered, if so, try and use it to get another assessment.
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#13 User is offline   Medwyn 

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Posted 20 June 2008 - 08:22 PM

View PostNot Waddie, on Jun 20 2008, 07:33 PM, said:

My feeling is that the way the legislation changed, combined with they method of assessment, the graduated lump sum scale, makes both the independence allowance and lump sum compensation a joke, especially for people who have suffered several injuries in different periods. It is one of the most complained about things.

I would take Medwyn's advice and get yourself right. Money makes life a bit easier but it does not fix your head.

Things to look at in terms of the decision

1. The independence allowance should be backdated to the date to claim for cover of the injury was lodged, but no earlier than 1 July 1992.
2. You can review the decision and argue a flaw in the assessment and seek a direction for another assessment to be done. Mediation may be offered, if so, try and use it to get another assessment.

Independence Allowance and lump Sums look attractive on paper, but to my way of thinking, they are an abrogation of responsibility. Maybe you could comment Not Waddie as you seem to have a handle on these things.

Once monies are paid, all responsibility for funding ceases as I see it and that is the danger especially in Abuse/Traumatic event scenarios where the "Flashback Trigger Point" may be activated, years after the event.

It's a hard thing to change a mindset when you have had your trust destroyed by abuse, and anything and everything is coloured by "What's in it for them?, what do they want" . It's also very hard to concentrate on getting oneself into a safe and calm state. I personally use gentle music like Pan Flutes or my favourite is one of Right Whale calls, haunting, but beautiful.

Lucy, you are not alone, others walk the same walk as the evidence on this board alone shows, but you can become a Survivor, not a victim or a statistic.

I wish you well, Go well and walk in peace

Respectfully,

Medwyn
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#14 User is offline   Not Waddie 

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Posted 20 June 2008 - 10:19 PM

If there is a deterioration you can be reassessed, but I describe the IA and Lump sum as crumbs from ACC's table. That sums it up I reckon.

Ideally (if thats the right word) you are better off having one severe injury, and preferably either in July 1992 or after 1 April 2002.
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#15 User is offline   redsquare74ucys 

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  Posted 20 June 2008 - 10:48 PM

*Thanks GM. Light back to you.

*Medwyn 1) help = nil
2) financial = nil
3) acc probably would fund even more counselling
4) no I'm not in counselling any more. Since this was the mechcanisim used to abuse me the last time I am finding it EXCEPTIONALLY difficult, and IMO it would be dangerous for me to attempt this again. There really is nothing else I can say apart from describing just how badly I have reacted to any attempts at counselling since 2005-2006. Not sure if your'e implying that I saw the $$$ and had an expectation of early retirement or something, but just so we're clear I felt I had no other resource other than to apply for a LS/IA in the hope that I could hire my own assistance. I have already borrowed to get some treatment. This amounts to approx 4K. I say again that traditional theraputic models clash with my core belief system THIS IS NOT AN OPTION!! No way would I give up my faith or regularly attend something that threatens it.


Did you know???
-That the symptoms of theraputic sexual abuse parallel that of incest....in fact the symptoms are indistingushable from one another. [Pope, Theraputic Boundaries in the Helping Professions 1992]
-80% of therapists who violate client sexual boundaries will do this again with other clients [Pope]
- Victims of theraputic boundary violation usually have been victims of childhood sexual abuse and therefore are unable to recognise that boundaries have been violated [Pope]

-Victims often empathise with their abuser (similar to the way kidnap victims empathise with their abductors)
-Victims of this type of sexual abuse often have trouble getting assistance, being forced to enter into the exact circumstances in which the sexual abuse occured. There is no safe space anymore. In my case he also happened to be on the board of Rape Crisis (I kid you not), and told me that he had done work with womens centers in the past. Intimidating.
-In NZ anyone can call themselves a counsellor, whether they are registered or qualified or not.
-Aside from media attention (brief at best) there is no way of stopping someone continuing to work in this field, with vunerable clients. I have LOST COUNT of the number of doctors, psychis, etc who have told me he won't be able to do this again.....
-Theraputic abuse has one of the lowest reporting rates of all sexual abuse, about the same as male rape.
-Did you know that this could be a sensitive claim.... I didn't!
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#16 User is offline   MINI 

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Posted 21 June 2008 - 10:19 AM

Lucys

Whoa!! you have been so traumatised.

I feel you are fighting too many fights. (Know the feeling well).

Like you are fighting against this therapist being able to do this to anyone again and

You are fighting to have what happened to you recognised by the powers that be. ie ACC's sensitive claim unit.

You obviously have 'cover', or you would not get to assessment stage.

Not Waddy is the best for this as I only deal with my own and that is "Independence Allowance", not "Lump sum".

At the end of the day, it is great having the on-line here, but we must figure it out for ourselves.

I have found that you must challange them on the 7%. If you do not have records you cannot challenge them on the alternative medicine/help you have received. Have you anything to prove that you had come right with the alternative care, before this other lot happened. If so, why were you in counselling with this toad??

If so, present it, but it is very traumatising to go back were you don't want to be. I know the feeling of, if you put it back there and leave it there it goes away. The problem with these shits, is they want a reason to beleive you can't have some of their money, so they want you to tell all, so you will allow them to assess you for anything they feel like.

I find to win something you must give up something. Well this is what has happened in my case, but then I was fighting for my life, my job, my income. It was all about money and being independent. I don't mind admitting that.

If I can remain independent I can have a reasonable life. So I have a goal. This keeps me going. But it also drags the very soul from me.

You have said you are not prepared to give up your religion. Good on you, but then they cant help you with their counselling etc. I had some of their counselling. Nice lady!! Really beaut. But they took her away while I am fighting them. I am allowed her back after I have finished. And I will finish fighting them. And I will get her back. I felt myself improving with her help. Being calmer, and less cognitive troubles etc. Able to concentrate more.

You are a strong person and obviously have a lot of will to fight on etc. But think long and hard, are the vermin worth it?? What is at the end of it if they cant pay for your counselling etc.

However I think this new Bill being heard at the moment just might be of some benefit to you.

The main thing is if you are going to do anything about getting the 7% increased dont forget to put in your Review papers.

Waddie does she need the 10% before any Lump sum is paid under the 2001 Act??? I feel that is the burning question here.

I feel they are just trying it on with 7%, so need to give them a bit of a run!!!

Good Luck Lucys
Sorry can't help you more, but am thinking of you

Mini
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#17 User is offline   Medwyn 

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Posted 21 June 2008 - 02:30 PM

View Postredsquare74ucys, on Jun 20 2008, 10:48 PM, said:

*Thanks GM. Light back to you.

*Medwyn 1) help = nil
2) financial = nil
3) acc probably would fund even more counselling
4) no I'm not in counselling any more. Since this was the mechcanisim used to abuse me the last time I am finding it EXCEPTIONALLY difficult, and IMO it would be dangerous for me to attempt this again. There really is nothing else I can say apart from describing just how badly I have reacted to any attempts at counselling since 2005-2006. Not sure if your'e implying that I saw the $$$ and had an expectation of early retirement or something, but just so we're clear I felt I had no other resource other than to apply for a LS/IA in the hope that I could hire my own assistance. I have already borrowed to get some treatment. This amounts to approx 4K. I say again that traditional theraputic models clash with my core belief system THIS IS NOT AN OPTION!! No way would I give up my faith or regularly attend something that threatens it.


Did you know???
-That the symptoms of theraputic sexual abuse parallel that of incest....in fact the symptoms are indistingushable from one another. [Pope, Theraputic Boundaries in the Helping Professions 1992]
-80% of therapists who violate client sexual boundaries will do this again with other clients [Pope]
- Victims of theraputic boundary violation usually have been victims of childhood sexual abuse and therefore are unable to recognise that boundaries have been violated [Pope]

-Victims often empathise with their abuser (similar to the way kidnap victims empathise with their abductors)
-Victims of this type of sexual abuse often have trouble getting assistance, being forced to enter into the exact circumstances in which the sexual abuse occured. There is no safe space anymore. In my case he also happened to be on the board of Rape Crisis (I kid you not), and told me that he had done work with womens centers in the past. Intimidating.
-In NZ anyone can call themselves a counsellor, whether they are registered or qualified or not.
-Aside from media attention (brief at best) there is no way of stopping someone continuing to work in this field, with vunerable clients. I have LOST COUNT of the number of doctors, psychis, etc who have told me he won't be able to do this again.....
-Theraputic abuse has one of the lowest reporting rates of all sexual abuse, about the same as male rape.
-Did you know that this could be a sensitive claim.... I didn't!

I'm not implying anything about the $$$$$$, just stating that too often, the option of the money looks atractive as it will pay the bills, fund the therapy etc.

Surviving is from personal and painful experience, a long, long and evolving process. It cannot begin without a radical shift of boundaries, mindsets, beliefs and a shift from the comfort zone.

I'm not into talking "shit" that I have not experienced, I am a Survivor of Systematic Abuse from family through to medical/therapeutic professionals so I have been there and to some extent will always be there.

I had to overcome fear and inbuilt protection mechanisms, and prejudices about therapy and solutions.

One thing I know is this, but for ACC, Sensitive Claims, several good therapists/counsellors over the years, I would have taken my life, thus denying my immediate family of me and my influences.

Another bit of advice for what it's worth. We who have been abused tend to operate on a higher/enhanced intellectual level as opposed to the "normal emotional pattern", we think rather than feel and in this age of information, we seek out all we can about our illnesses and injuries and remedies by Googling and research, to my mind and experience, to our disadvantage.

We above all have to learn trust, as without it I'm sorry to say, there is no healing, neither is there an instant fix.

You do a disservice to anyone who works in this area by using your experience to paint all therapists/professionals with the same brush, despite what you believe or read, there are good, honest, empathetic professionals out there who more than go the extra mile. They have to abide by protocols set by ACC, but I would suggest that most genuine counsellors go into bat for their clients and seek to offer help with the symptoms of abuse.

I do not know just how to 'talk" to you, in case I upset or anger you, just let it be that I have experienced what I talk about ans I'm still alive and surviving.

Respectfully,

medwyn
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#18 User is offline   MINI 

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Posted 22 June 2008 - 09:31 AM

Medwyn

Fantastic advice.

I am so pleased that you took the opportunities afforded to you by ACC and got some really excellent help by the sounds of it .

You are very strong now. I can hear it and feel it in your writings.

What a success story.

You know and see ACC's faults but also take advantage of their pros.

You see the need to be here for those that love you and hold you dear. Another positive.

Go well

Mini
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#19 User is offline   Medwyn 

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Posted 22 June 2008 - 11:59 AM

View PostMINI, on Jun 22 2008, 09:31 AM, said:

Medwyn

Fantastic advice.

I am so pleased that you took the opportunities afforded to you by ACC and got some really excellent help by the sounds of it .

You are very strong now. I can hear it and feel it in your writings.

What a success story.

You know and see ACC's faults but also take advantage of their pros.

You see the need to be here for those that love you and hold you dear. Another positive.

Go well

Mini

If my posting helps Lucy to just try to trust, to just once step out out her "Safe Place" and try the help that is there, then that would be a great start, It's just taking that first step.

Lucy, there are other's here who have been where you are at, others who have made that first step and Survived, you can make that first step, and you can get help.

At he risk of being offensive *&$3#" the future, live for today, for the hour, for the present and get yourself well.

I'm concerned, but I cannot do anything or offer any further steps until you decide to make a slight shift. We are here for you, but you must be the major part of it.

This is not a beat up, just a genuine desire to see you getting well enough to sort things out.
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#20 User is offline   Medwyn 

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Posted 22 June 2008 - 01:22 PM

View PostMedwyn, on Jun 22 2008, 11:59 AM, said:

If my posting helps Lucy to just try to trust, to just once step out out her "Safe Place" and try the help that is there, then that would be a great start, It's just taking that first step.

Lucy, there are other's here who have been where you are at, others who have made that first step and Survived, you can make that first step, and you can get help.

At he risk of being offensive *&$3#" the future, live for today, for the hour, for the present and get yourself well.

I'm concerned, but I cannot do anything or offer any further steps until you decide to make a slight shift. We are here for you, but you must be the major part of it.

This is not a beat up, just a genuine desire to see you getting well enough to sort things out.

Further to my previous posting, I went back over some notes I had given out tin the past but they may be of relevance now in the current situation.


There is a minimum set of criteria for effective trauma-related counselling. The only therapists or recovery programs you should consider must do the following:
• Regard the trauma as real and important in itself, apart from your other concerns view you as capable of being healed.
• Be familiar with and be able to educate you about the facts of your particular trauma (whether it be war, sexual assault, medical disability); the grieving process; the various kinds of post-traumatic reactions, such as depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, and dissociation; the physical, emotional, sexual and interpersonal after-effects of trauma; the nature of the recovery process; and the faulty thinking patterns that can lead to an irrational sense of unworthiness, guilt, shame, powerlessness and hopelessness
• Be willing to listen to details of your traumatic experiences yet not pressure you to share aspects of the assault you do not wish to disclose
• Not push you to discuss your trauma (or any other aspect of your past)if you are coping with a current life crisis; if you have an untreated addiction psychiatric or medical problem; or if you develop any of the warning signs listed in the section below entitled “Emergencies.”
• Either teach you coping skills, such as relaxation techniques or anger management, or make appropriate referrals for you to receive such help
• Use or recommend behaviour-management techniques when appropriate, but not to the exclusion of examining the trauma or any past and present events important to you.
Organizations: Finding a Therapist or Treatment Program
In choosing a therapist or treatment program, you have the right to shop around and ask questions. Get recommendations from doctors, and people who report having had positive therapeutic experiences.

Emergencies
If you are experiencing any of the following symptoms, seek professional help immediately: memory problems; feeling disoriented or out of touch with reality, even temporarily; suicidal or homicidal thoughts; self-destructive behaviour, such as substance abuse or self-mutilation; hyperventilation, extreme nausea; haemorrhaging, uncontrollable shaking; irregular heartbeat; hallucinations (visual or auditory), increased symptoms of a pre-existing medical or psychiatric problem; fear of being or becoming out-of-control, or any intense, new or unexplained pain. If you can not contact a mental health professional immediately, call a local Community Mental Health Team or go to the emergency room of the nearest hospital. Consult your local phone directory for contact information on local crisis hotlines, local crises centres, and local hospitals.

The Screening Process
When you have obtained the names of at least two therapists who seem to meet the minimum criteria for effective trauma related counselling listed above or whose specialties seem to fit your needs, call and interview each of them by phone. Before inquiring about qualifications, ask about available openings and fees. Eliminate therapists and programs that are geographically inaccessible, whose fees are prohibitive and whose available time slots are not workable for you.

If the therapist or program meets your needs in these areas, then inquire about their training, experience and focus. It is essential that you inquire about these matters to verify that any potential therapist or program does, in fact, meet the criteria listed above for effective trauma related counselling (or counselling for your particular concern.) ; how they keep up with the latest developments in area of trauma and related areas; and whether they have colleagues available for consultation who are experts in areas relevant to your recovery.
You needn’t sound hostile, but don’t avoid asking the hard questions for fear of offending either. Remember, your mental and physical health is at stake. You can preface your questions by stating that you are faced with a bewildering array of alternatives and want to make the best choice for you.
Consider asking questions such as the following:
• How long have you been in practice? Are you a member of any professional organizations? What is your formal training in the areas of (a) your particular trauma and (B) related or other concerns? What, in your view, constitutes the trauma recovery process?
• What approaches would you take towards helping with some of the secondary problems arising from trauma,, such as substance abuse, eating disorders, dissociation, or depression?
• What would you do if I became suicidal or felt out-of-control?

After you have narrowed your list , go visit them.

After this initial interview, think about these questions:
• Does the therapist or program counsellor seems supportive and respectful towards you?
• Do you feel you could disclose to this person your inner feelings about the trauma (or other important concern)?
• Most importantly, what is your gut feeling about the therapist?
• Qualifications are important and you should be considering only qualified therapists at this point but the final decision may be a matter of finding the best emotional match for you. If you have strong negative feelings towards a particular therapist after an initial interview, even if the therapist is well qualified, it probably isn’t a good match. If you are ambivalent, consider meeting with the therapist an additional time before making your decision.
While many psychologists – both men and women - call themselves “feminist” or “non-sexist,” you need to decide for yourself if they actually are. Remember that just because a therapist is a woman does not automatically make her a non-sexist. Furthermore, today many male therapists are committed to non-sexist treatment and provide excellent counselling.

Evaluating the Course of Therapy and Other Forms of Counselling
Note: The suggestions provided below for evaluating the course of therapy apply to other forms of counselling, such as working with a member of the clergy, a spiritual advisor, or others.
Once you’ve selected a therapist, you can begin your therapy on a trial basis. Make a commitment to work with the therapist for six weeks or some other limited time period; then reassess your choice.
• How do you seem to be faring?
• How effective has the therapist been in addressing the problems you’ve had due to the trauma, including secondary problems such as addiction or depression?
• Discuss these issues with the therapist.
• What is his or her assessment of your progress and prognosis for healing?
If the therapist you’ve selected turns out to have been a poor choice, use the knowledge you’ve gained to find a better one. The wrong therapist can do more harm than good. However, as you make your decision about whether to continue with a specific therapist, bear in mind that the course of therapy is not always smooth: backsliding, regression and hostility on your part may all be a part of the healing. Just because you don’t feel better every time you leave the office doesn’t necessarily mean the therapist isn’t helping you.
Definitely stop seeing the therapist if you believe that he or she is actually doing you harm:
For example,
• if the therapist directly or indirectly blames you for the trauma or for other forms of emotional or physical pain in your life;
• doubts your truthfulness;
• shows excessive interest in the sexual or violent details of your trauma or life situation;
• can not seem to tolerate your emotional pain or your anger;
• is unwilling to discuss your questions about or discontent with the therapy without becoming hostile towards you or blaming you for your dissatisfaction with your progress;
• is constantly or frequently pointing out how the problems you had before the trauma (or other stressful situation) contribute greatly to your symptoms;
• or urges you to continue examining your trauma (or your childhood or other aspects of your life) when you can barely make it through the day, for example, when you relapse into addiction, sink into a deep depression.
You should also be sceptical about a therapist who believes that the negative effects of the trauma (or your particular stressful situation) would go away if only
• you tried harder,
• forgave the whomever or whatever wronged you,
• really wanted to heal,
• gave up your anger,
• or had a more positive attitude towards life.
If You Are Referred to a Psychiatrist
If your psychological symptoms are sufficiently severe, a psychiatric evaluation may be suggested. You have nothing to lose by taking a few hours out of your life for a complete psychiatric work-up. Be prepared to list your current and past medical problems and medications and your symptoms, their duration and frequency and any other observations you have about them. At the conclusion of evaluation, medication may or may not be recommended. It is your choice whether or not to take it. You don’t have to decide on the spot. It is your right to have the psychiatrist explain your diagnosis and the medication in detail. If you chose to take medication, be aware that medication needs constant monitoring. You may need to telephone the psychiatrist several times before the right dosage is established. You will also need to call if the negative side effects are problematic or seem to outweigh any positive effects of the medication. Call the psychiatrist or Community Mental Health Team if you feel numb or tired much of the time; can not concentrate; have physical symptoms such as bleeding, muscle tremors, seizures, dizzy spells, hyperventilation, dark or discoloured urine, rashes, inability to urinate, constipation, loss of menstrual period or sex drive, severe headaches, nausea; suicidal thoughts.
Do not let these side effects go unattended!


The above is given freely and is based on advice I have been given and experienced personally. The crux of the matter is you have to be able to work with ALL agencies including therapists and Government Agencies and their agents and therein lies difficulty for some.
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