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Harassment Law And Acc Discussion/Resources & Should ACC provide for this?

#661 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 07 December 2018 - 02:30 PM



It would be interesting to do a follow up on this survey/ report and establish if education and good manners are maybe contributing factors why these men perceptions are what they are.

Perhaps they were raised in environments, work and circulate in places where sexual harassment of anyone is frowned upon and honestly doesn't happen as they have been brought up to treat people with respect.

Not all men treat women and vice versa with disrespect thank gooodness for that.

Please click on the link for the full article and links


Sexual harassment

Men underestimate level of sexual harassment against women – survey

Campaigners shocked that public awareness is low despite #MeToo movement


https://www.theguard...st-women-survey



Pamela Duncan and Alexandra Topping

Thu 6 Dec 2018 07.00 GMT

Men greatly underestimate the level of sexual harassment experienced by women, according to a new survey.
#MeToo founder Tarana Burke: ‘You have to use your privilege to serve other people’
Read more

When asked what proportion of women had experienced any form of sexual harassment, both male and female respondents across the US and 12 European countries, including Great Britain, underestimated the levels experienced by women.

The biggest misconceptions were held by Danish, Dutch and French respondents, who underestimated the actual level of sexual harassment in their countries by 49, 35 and 34 percentage points respectively.

The question was part of the pollster Ipsos Mori’s Perils of Perception survey, which measures the gap between the public’s understanding of issues and reality.
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#662 User is offline   Alan Thomas 

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Posted 07 December 2018 - 03:27 PM

What if anything does sexual harassment have to do with the ACC legislation?
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#663 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 17 December 2018 - 12:39 PM

Law Society working group releases report into harassment, inappropriate behaviour

17 Dec, 2018 11:00am

https://www.nzherald...jectid=12178150


Michael Neilson
By: Michael Neilson
General/Māori Affairs reporter, NZ Herald
[email protected]

Female lawyers have been subjected to "sexual objectification" for decades and new rules are needed to address unacceptable behaviour, a review has concluded.

The New Zealand Law Society is planning changes to reporting and is taking action on sexual harassment and bullying in the legal profession following the comprehensive report.

A working group, chaired by Dame Silvia Cartwright, was set up to look at the processes for reporting and taking action on harassment and inappropriate behaviour in legal workplaces.

It considered if improvements could be made to enable better reporting to the Law Society of harassment in the legal profession.
Recommendations included new rules for lawyers which specifically require high personal and professional standards with specific reference to sexual harassment, bullying, discrimination and other unacceptable behaviour.

The report also called for specific prohibition on victimisation of people who report unacceptable behaviour in good faith, and a specialised process for dealing with complaints of unacceptable behaviour.

The working group was established in mid-April following widespread allegations of sexual harassment, bullying and discrimination within the legal profession, combined with a culture of silence and under-reporting of such misconduct.

Former staff members of top law firm Russell McVeagh had spoken out about sexually inappropriate behaviour by lawyers towards summer law clerks, and controversy also arose around the Otago University law camp following a series of allegations of nudity and jelly wrestling.

The working group found sex discrimination and sexual objectification of women lawyers was not new, and had taken place in the New Zealand legal profession since at least the 1950s. In a national survey in 1992, 38 per cent of women lawyers reported sexual harassment.

The Law Society's board has accepted the recommendations made in the report on the regulatory processes for lawyers where unacceptable workplace behaviour occurs.
"We wanted to know what was wrong with the current system and have received compelling independent answers including that conduct and reporting standards are unclear and must be addressed so to remove any confusion over what is expected of all lawyers," president Kathryn Beck said.

"The Law Society will now develop a programme to determine how they can be put into effect.

"Some of the recommendations are currently outside the mandate of the Law Society and require legislative change.

"The Law Society will work in consultation with the Government, the profession and other organisations to achieve the appropriate outcome."

Justice Minister Andrew Little
had been advised of the report's recommendations and the Law Society would be seeking a meeting in the New Year, Beck said.

The four other members of the working group included Jane Drumm, Philip Hamlin, Joy Liddicoat and Elisabeth McDonald.


Planned New Zealand Law Society changes:

• New rules for lawyers which specifically require high personal and professional standards with specific reference to sexual harassment, bullying, discrimination and other unacceptable behaviour.

• A specific prohibition on victimisation of people who report unacceptable behaviour in good faith.

• The imposition of minimum obligations on legal workplaces or lawyers who are responsible for workplaces. This will include auditing and monitoring of compliance and a prevention on the use of non-disclosure agreements to contract out or conceal unacceptable behaviour.

• A more flexible two-stage approach to confidentiality for complaints about sexual violence, bullying, sexual harassment, discrimination and related conduct.

• Creation of a specialised process for dealing with complaints of unacceptable behaviour.

• Changes to the procedures of the New Zealand Lawyers and Conveyancers Disciplinary Tribunal.

• Investigation of mandatory training and education of lawyers to address culture problems in the legal profession.
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#664 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 17 December 2018 - 12:53 PM


The New Zealand Law Society also need to ensure that the much needed work to be done is done in respect of the manner in which women are treated in general terms within the wider Legal Systems when it comes to Harassment in the community outside of the home and workplaces which is included under The Harassment Act and grant them Restraining Orders, especially where the harassers have known histories of pyschological and other violence and have Protection Orders against them as has been in the case involving XYZ where an offender undertook an insidious trail of destruction, knew how to beat the legal systems and took his rot to his grave without been held to account.

Google and Legal databases are our friends to help us in situations like this.

Shall we name names of those who should know and act better who have endorsed Sexual and other Harassment of women, women who have taken courage to report unsolicited behaviors that are unacceptable to those who are normal law abidding citizens in society?

We understand that the Police know who they are and have evidence that should be used to prosecute the said members of the Legal Fraternity for there abhorrent behaviours of causing further distress to the said complainaints - note plural not singular.


Grace Millane and The Harassment Act 1997

As an aside,
It would be very fitting if we all ensured that there is a greater awareness to all that The Harassment Act 1997, which will have been enacted for 22 years next year, is placed in the limelight to prevent another case like that of Grace Millane ocurring, who was 22 years young, if indeed it is true she meet the alleged offender who we understand she knew only a very short time online so may not have been protected as per the Provisions of The Domestic Violence Act but may well have been afforded protection of her lawful right to her Personal Safety to be free from harm as per the provisions of The Harassment Act.


The Harassment Act legislation was created for a purpose and that inlcudes protecting ALL victims of Harassment not provided for under the provisions of The Domestic Violence Act legislation


http://www.legislati.../DLM417078.html


http://www.lawsociet...riate-behaviour

Law Society plans changes to regulatory process for lawyers accused of inappropriate behaviour

17 December 2018

The New Zealand Law Society is planning a number of changes to the processes for reporting and taking action on sexual harassment and bullying in the legal profession.

These include:

New rules for lawyers which specifically require high personal and professional standards with specific reference to sexual harassment, bullying, discrimination and other unacceptable behaviour.
A specific prohibition on victimisation of people who report unacceptable behaviour in good faith.
The imposition of minimum obligations on legal workplaces or lawyers who are responsible for workplaces. This will include auditing and monitoring of compliance and a prevention on the use of non-disclosure agreements to contract out or conceal unacceptable behaviour.
A more flexible two-stage approach to confidentiality for complaints about sexual violence, bullying, sexual harassment, discrimination and related conduct.
Creation of a specialised process for dealing with complaints of unacceptable behaviour.
Changes to the procedures of the New Zealand Lawyers and Conveyancers Disciplinary Tribunal.
Investigation of mandatory training and education of lawyers to address culture problems in the legal profession.

The Law Society’s Board has accepted the recommendations made in a report on the regulatory processes for lawyers where unacceptable workplace behaviour occurs. The report has been prepared by a five-person independent working group established by the law Society in March and chaired by Dame Silvia Cartwright.

Presented to the New Zealand Law Society Board on 7 December, it identifies a range of problems with the current reporting regime and concludes that the regulatory mechanisms and processes are not effectively designed for dealing with complaints about sexual violence, harassment, discrimination and bullying.

New Zealand Law Society President, Kathryn Beck says the working group has prepared a comprehensive and well-researched report which fully meets its terms of reference.

“Dame Silvia and the other four members have provided valuable information and insights into the issues involved. They have consulted widely and they have developed several recommendations. We thank them for their careful and thoughtful report.

“We wanted to know what was wrong with the current system and have received compelling independent answers including that conduct and reporting standards are unclear and must be addressed so to remove any confusion over what is expected of all lawyers,” she says.

Ms Beck says some of the recommendations are complex and far-reaching, but they will assist in making the legal community a safe place for all.

“The Law Society will now develop a programme to determine how they can be put into effect. Some of the recommendations are currently outside the mandate of the Law Society and require legislative change. The Law Society will work in consultation with the government, the profession and other organisations to achieve the appropriate outcome.

“We have already advised the Minister, Andrew Little, of the report’s recommendations and will seek a meeting in the New Year to hear his views and to discuss how we can implement the required rules changes,” Ms Beck says.

“As indicated in the working group’s report, and as with all legislative change, it will be important to take care to ensure there are no unintended consequences. A consultative and collaborative approach is needed, and this is essential to ensure we achieve our objective of healthy, safe, respectful and inclusive legal workplaces.”

The full regulatory working group report is available here
https://www.lawsocie...cember-2018.pdf

A copy of the Terms of Reference of the Group can be found here.
https://www.lawsocie...f-Reference.pdf
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