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Audit Reveals Acc Pay Judges very interesting

#1 Guest_ACC's Nightmare_*

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Posted 29 January 2004 - 07:06 PM

A Government Audit confirms that ACC do in fact pay:

* Judges salaries
* Judges Allowances and fees
* ACC buys the Judges Vehicles
am sure there is more on this to follow,

to check what has been posted here then you may check
by contacting:

J.P.Olson,
Sector Manager
Office of the Controller and Auditor General
Phone (04) 9171500

section 164, Dept of salaries, allowances and fees (might be high court or acc act?)


clearly this illustrates that judges might not be independant,
one could reasonably say that this could be seen as some measures to buy judges whom will have a higher percentage of favourable judgements for ACC against claimants
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#2 User is offline   twostickswalking 

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Posted 29 January 2004 - 07:58 PM

this makes the "peters" piece meal, pale in comparison, perhaps Mr Holmes
and the Lay Observers need to hear this one
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#3 User is offline   straw 

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  Posted 03 February 2004 - 10:34 PM

Hi folks, yes well we got this info re judges cars being paid for by ACC direct from the audit office, sent details to tv 1 and holmes, and guess what????? nothing! thats what.... Think maybe too big to handle. Also sent to hinchco, havent heard wether he has confirmed it or not yet either......... Just want confirmation on this cause sometimes you get things right from the horses mouth and it is so unbelievable that suddenly you think, god did I hear that right? did I misconstue that info?, am i going stark starring crazy?, think we all know that feeling huh?.
Keep sane guys and tc
Regards Straw :unsure: :blink:
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#4 Guest_NoRehab_*

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Posted 03 February 2004 - 10:44 PM

a question from another claimant:


How many claimants have been exited or had more hassles since they signed the form for an enquiry into ACC?
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#5 User is offline   straw 

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Posted 03 February 2004 - 10:51 PM

IDB, on Feb 3 2004, 11:44 PM, said:

a question from another claimant:


How many claimants have been exited or had more hassles since they signed the form for an enquiry into ACC?

mmmm well idb thats an interesting comment???quite a few me thinks....seems the more u stir the more they make it harder for you, I know i am one of the biggest stirrers, I have been hit harder than some I know who have lessor injuries!, but they are still on their benefits... Thought provoking tho! :wacko:
Straw
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#6 Guest_flowers_*

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Posted 03 February 2004 - 11:45 PM

IDB, on Feb 3 2004, 11:44 PM, said:

a question from another claimant:


How many claimants have been exited or had more hassles since they signed the form for an enquiry into ACC?

I suspect I am

Attached File(s)


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#7 User is offline   straw 

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Posted 08 February 2004 - 09:24 PM

mmmm strange isnt it Mr olsen must have finished his audit for the ACC audit,he has now moved on. Can anyone find the act that relates to ACC paying for judges cars etc? it must be thre somewhere. Unfortunatley I dont have access to either act.
When and how does one find out the results of this audit? is it available to the public?. How do we find out when it goes through Parliament?.
Can anyone help?.
Definatly heard it direct from him and our solicitor who confirmed that this is correct they do get supplied with vehicles etc.....
If you know anything would like to hear
Thanks straw
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#8 Guest_NoRehab_*

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Posted 11 February 2004 - 09:19 PM

Am told this section is relevant to the issue:

Injury Prevention, Rehabilitation, and Compensation Act 2001
Commenced: 1 April 2002

5: Dispute resolution

164 Recovery of costs of appeals

164 Recovery of costs of appeals

(1) The Corporation must in each financial year pay to the Department for
Courts such amount as the Corporation and that Department agree as being---

(a) the reasonable administrative costs of appeals under this Part; and

(B) the reasonable costs of appeals under this Part in relation to
judicial salaries, fees, and allowances.

(2) Subsection (1) applies to costs that are not met by the parties to
appeals under this Part.
Compare: 1998 No 114 s 167
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#9 User is offline   doppelganger 

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Posted 12 February 2004 - 06:38 PM

were does a car from ACc come into it. the courts have there own cars and if a judge needs a car to travel to hearing one of those should be available.

Doppelganger
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#10 User is offline   mouse 

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Posted 16 February 2004 - 04:39 PM

Just confirmed in writing by Craig Neil Assistant Auditor-General

It will be availabe once they have "the report tabled in Parliament, which we expect to do later on this month or early March."
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#11 User is offline   Down 

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Posted 25 February 2004 - 03:24 PM

From 2003 it's all about Dyson's NZ Injury Prevention Strategy and those contributor's


http://www.google.co.nz/search?q=cache:Y5K...&hl=en&ie=UTF-8

Come across these sites:

http://www.pco.parli.../faq/faq.html#2


And yes you can read this lot ......:D

http://www.knowledge-basket.co.nz/gpprint/...cs/welcome.html
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#12 User is offline   doppelganger 

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Posted 25 February 2004 - 07:32 PM

and this is very intresting
http://www.knowledge-basket.co.nz/gpprint/...ls/20030711.txt

Doppelganger
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#13 User is offline   Down 

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Posted 26 February 2004 - 01:14 PM

Tuesday, 6 May, 2003

Audit finds ACC project fault
ACC says project is on track and on budget
Stephen Bell, Wellington

A PriceWaterhouseCoopers audit of the Accident Compensation Corporation’s wide area network upgrade project found that “ACC had not managed the project using standard processes”, a spokesman for the organisation said last week.

“As a result, ACC has switched the project supervision to the corporation's project management office and strengthened the governance regime to conform with standard ACC practices,” the spokesman said, in response to a Computerworld inquiry.

The organisation denies rumours that the irregularities had involved a senior member of the ICT staff being dismissed or disciplined for having too close a relationship with a vendor.

The WAN project involves ACC upgrading digital data circuits to ATM and frame relay circuits. TelstraClear ATM circuits are being terminated on Cisco 7200 and 2600 routers across 48 ACC sites.

The project is being managed by Datacraft New Zealand and, according to ACC, “is on track as planned, on budget and is due to be completed by the end of June”.

http://www.computerworld.co.nz/news.nsf/UN...C256D1C0077E8C0

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Thursday, 22 January, 2004

ACC goes offshore for content

Corporation pushes ahead with IT projects such as Pathway replacement
David Watson, Auckland

The Accident Compensation Corporation will be the first business in the country to implement a US enterprise-level content management system.

ACC chose Stellent as the preferred vendor for its new system on the basis of organisational fit and price.

Stellent is no minnow. The company, which is based in Minnesota, has as one of its biggest customers healthcare multinational Procter & Gamble, for whom it is installing a system that will let 100,000 employees move content from the multinational’s back-end system to other applications.

ACC programme office manager Bob Walton says he understands ACC is New Zealand’s first Stellent site and notes that, while local content management systems were considered, “it was the big guys who could meet the wider requirements”.

Stellent was seen as the best fit on all criteria, including price, says ACC development general manager Murray Young.

The first piece of work on the new system is a pilot of electronic case files in one of ACC’s contact centres for telephone case management. “After that, the intention is to have electronic files throughout the organisation by June.”

ACC will use Stellent 7.0, which was released in September.

The latest version includes a common user interface and single server and repository architecture for Stellent’s content management application modules.

Another major project for ACC this year is the replacement of its Pathway claim management system.

Computerworld understands a preferred vendor has been selected and that final details are being worked through.

Pathway, a bespoke system used by ACC for several years, has served it well, Young says, but it lacks desired features such as workflow.

Other ACC IT developments to be carried out this year include the implementation of Oracle 11 financials to replace SmartStream and replacing Microsoft Windows NT with XP and Office 97 with Office XP.

Microsoft will colonise several spaces presently occupied by Novell, including on the server, where NetWare will be replaced by Windows Server 2003.

Novell NDS will be supplanted by Microsoft Active Directory and GroupWise by Microsoft Outlook/Exchange.

http://www.computerworld.co.nz/news.nsf/UN...C256E220012D864
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Audit finds ACC project fault

A PriceWaterhouseCoopers audit of the Accident Compensation Corporation’s wide area network upgrade project found that “ACC had not managed the project using standard processes”, a spokesman for the organisation said last week.
(Computerworld - 06/05/2003)
Low dollar hikes IT costs
Users face networking and PC price hikes following the slump in the New Zealand dollar.
(Computerworld - 04/09/2000)
Solnet wins ACC contract, Web filing to follow
Solnet has won a contract to build an electronic claims gateway to streamline the Accident Compensation Corporation's claims processes.
(Computerworld - 08/05/2000)
Thin wallet meets thin client
Hagley Community College in Christchurch has amassed a mixed bag of computers over the years, including many donated by local companies. Thanks to thin-client computing using NCD WinCenter (an extension of Citrix WinFrame), the school is now making use of all its hardware, regardless of age, make or processor.
(Computerworld - 04/10/98)
Audit study raises major concerns over ACC security
A damning Audit Office computer assurance review at the Accident Compensation Corporation has identified control weaknesses that expose the corporation to the risk of unauthorised or unintended modification of its business systems and data also increase the opportunity for fraud or error to occur.
(Computerworld - 30/06/97)

http://www.computerworld.co.nz/news.nsf/UN...C256D1C0077E8C0

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Monday, 30 June, 1997

Audit study raises major concerns over ACC security
Control weaknesses leave system open to attack, fraud or error, says report
Randal Jackson, WELLINGTON


A damning Audit Office computer assurance review at the Accident Compensation Corporation has identified control weaknesses that expose the corporation to the risk of unauthorised or unintended modification of its business systems and data.

The review, in the 1995-96 year, is a key component of the annual financial review of the corporation by the Social Services Select Committee, which draws Parliament’s attention to what it describes as another example of a major computer project not performing to expectations.

The Audit Office report says the control weaknesses also increase the opportunity for fraud or error to occur.

The select committee says it will monitor the situation and that it expects ACC to quickly take appropriate steps to address the weaknesses. “We will be seeking a report from the corporation on the actions it has taken.”

The committee also confirms the cost blow-out associated with the ACCtion project. “We believe the substantial variation between the board approval of $19 million and the projected cost of completion of more than $100 million points to inadequate reporting and accountability.”

As of June 30, 1996, $11 million of expenditure on the ACCtion project had been spent on scoping and research. Costs of approximately $2 million had been capitalised and related primarily to the purchase of new PABX systems.

“We are concerned that of the approximately $15 million in total that was spent, only a small percentage has been capitalised to date,” the committee says. “We would expect to see a much higher level of capitalisation for a board-approved project. The lack of capitalisation indicates that the money spent on scoping this project has not delivered results that could then be treated as final capital costs.

ACC has scaled down the ACCtion project significantly and the residual IT initiatives have been renamed the Pathway project.
In response to written questions from Computerworld, ACC says Pathway is being designed to receive claim registration data electronically via EDI or from a scanning/OCR source, or via conventional data entry. Pathway thus automates the process from the point of receipt of registration data.

“Pathway has already delivered much of the technology infrastructure, particularly the national network upgrade and systems management components, and the roll-out of Microsoft NT to the desktop is advancing rapidly,” ACC says. “The progressive delivery of further infrastructure elements will continue throughout the coming year.”

New business software is expected to be delivered under Pathway in August, with increments to be implemented six months and 10 months further out. The timing of further implementations after June 1998 has yet to be agreed internally and approved by the board.

ACC says the main technical benefit is the replacement of failing systems, which would begin to fail in 1998 because of year 2000 errors.

Business benefits include improved outcomes for claimants and funders through the use of tools to support case management decision making. Paper work will be reduced, and there are expected to be fewer errors because of the automation of payment calculations.

It’s expected that systems replacement will be completed during 1998.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Monday, 8 May, 2000

Solnet wins ACC contract, Web filing to follow

Russell Brown, Auckland


Solnet has won a contract to build an electronic claims gateway to streamline the Accident Compensation Corporation's claims processes. The first phase will enable Web filing of ACC claim forms by health providers.

ACC chief executive Garry Wilson says the cost of filing a claim form will reduce from dollars to cents. The estimated cost of the project is $750,000.

A pilot programme, due to begin this month, will be tested at 25 general practitioner sites nationally.

The gateway is being built using iPlanet's application server, directory server and unified user management products.

http://www.computerworld.co.nz/news.nsf/UN...C2568D8006D431F

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Instant messaging to follow ministry email upgrade
About 30 Ministry of Health staff have hooked up to IBM's Lotus instant messaging product, but the ministry is delaying further deployment of IM until an upgrade to Lotus Notes 6.5, scheduled to get under way mid-year, is complete.
(Computerworld - 26/02/2004)
More domains may be on way
New Zealanders may get new second-level domains to follow geek.nz and maori.nz later this year, after InternetNZ released its draft 2LD policy yesterday.
(Computerworld - 26/02/2004)
People, not perks, the key say listers
Keeping staff happy may be a matter of challenging and inspiring them rather than coddling them with cash and perks, according to IT companies on a New Zealand list of the best places to work.
(Computerworld - 26/02/2004)
Latest Mydoom variant deletes files
The latest variant of the Mydoom virus, discovered Friday, is still spreading and actively deleting files from victims' computers, security researchers warned yesterday.
(Computerworld - 26/02/2004)
Management tool gets approval
US company Altiris is claiming to have a potent weapon for reducing the cost of client and server system management. And its tool suite gets a ringing endorsement from local customer AC Nielsen, which has been using the software for three years.
(Computerworld - 26/02/2004)

http://www.computerworld.co.nz/news.nsf/UN...C256E430069EE9F
http://www.computerworld.co.nz/news.nsf/UN...C25684C000DF315
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#14 User is offline   jocko 

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Posted 30 March 2004 - 08:35 AM

Seems very strange. A work and disability insurance corporation paying judges and buying them cars. Could this explain some of the bizarre decisions that completely ignore the merits of the case? Tell me do review officers get cars as well? I asked for transport for independence, it was refused and I wound up trespassed. Does ACC only supply social rehabilitation as transport for independence to judges?
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#15 Guest_IDB_*

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Posted 30 April 2004 - 12:08 PM

Public urged to have their say on judge appointed
Friday, 30 April 2004, 11:33 am
Press Release: New Zealand Government


Public urged to have their say on way judges appointed

Attorney-General Margaret Wilson today released a public consultation paper encouraging New Zealanders to have their say on the way judges are appointed in this country.

“The Ministry of Justice paper explores the idea of setting up a Judicial Appointment Commission for New Zealand,” she says. “Such commissions operate in a number of countries including the United States, Canada and South Africa. And the British Government has recently introduced legislation proposing similar commissions be established in the United Kingdom.”

Currently all judges in this country are appointed by the Governor-General on the advice of the Attorney-General who in turns takes advice from the Solicitor-General and the Chief Justice and/or the Chief Judge of court to which the appointment is made.

Margaret Wilson says the country has been well served by its judges, both current and past, and over many decades Attorneys-General and other Ministers have undertaken their roles in recommending judicial appointments with due diligence and integrity.

“However, from time to time, commentators have asked whether the appointment process could be improved, possibly by establishing a judicial appointments commission to identify and recommend suitable candidates for judicial office. Last year a number of submissions on the legislation establishing our Supreme Court supported the call for a judicial appointments commission.”

Providing an opportunity for wider discussion on the issue is all part of maintaining public confidence in the judiciary and ensuring its ongoing independence, Margaret Wilson says. Copies of the consultation paper, Appointing Judges: A Judicial Appointment Commission For New Zealand?, are available at www.justice.govt.nz or by contacting the Ministry of Justice on (04) 918 8800. The closing date for submissions is 30 July.

http://www.scoop.co....0404/S00496.htm
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#16 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 22 June 2012 - 05:30 PM

Hmmm, what will the current audits/ investigations disclose?

More of the same?


Monday, 30 June, 1997

Audit study raises major concerns over ACC security
Control weaknesses leave system open to attack, fraud or error, says report
Randal Jackson, WELLINGTON


A damning Audit Office computer assurance review at the Accident Compensation Corporation has identified control weaknesses that expose the corporation to the risk of unauthorised or unintended modification of its business systems and data.

The review, in the 1995-96 year, is a key component of the annual financial review of the corporation by the Social Services Select Committee, which draws Parliament�s attention to what it describes as another example of a major computer project not performing to expectations.

The Audit Office report says the control weaknesses also increase the opportunity for fraud or error to occur.

The select committee says it will monitor the situation and that it expects ACC to quickly take appropriate steps to address the weaknesses. �We will be seeking a report from the corporation on the actions it has taken.�

The committee also confirms the cost blow-out associated with the ACCtion project. �We believe the substantial variation between the board approval of $19 million and the projected cost of completion of more than $100 million points to inadequate reporting and accountability.�

As of June 30, 1996, $11 million of expenditure on the ACCtion project had been spent on scoping and research. Costs of approximately $2 million had been capitalised and related primarily to the purchase of new PABX systems.

�We are concerned that of the approximately $15 million in total that was spent, only a small percentage has been capitalised to date,� the committee says. �We would expect to see a much higher level of capitalisation for a board-approved project. The lack of capitalisation indicates that the money spent on scoping this project has not delivered results that could then be treated as final capital costs.

ACC has scaled down the ACCtion project significantly and the residual IT initiatives have been renamed the Pathway project.
In response to written questions from Computerworld, ACC says Pathway is being designed to receive claim registration data electronically via EDI or from a scanning/OCR source, or via conventional data entry. Pathway thus automates the process from the point of receipt of registration data.

�Pathway has already delivered much of the technology infrastructure, particularly the national network upgrade and systems management components, and the roll-out of Microsoft NT to the desktop is advancing rapidly,� ACC says. �The progressive delivery of further infrastructure elements will continue throughout the coming year.�

New business software is expected to be delivered under Pathway in August, with increments to be implemented six months and 10 months further out. The timing of further implementations after June 1998 has yet to be agreed internally and approved by the board.

ACC says the main technical benefit is the replacement of failing systems, which would begin to fail in 1998 because of year 2000 errors.

Business benefits include improved outcomes for claimants and funders through the use of tools to support case management decision making. Paper work will be reduced, and there are expected to be fewer errors because of the automation of payment calculations.

It�s expected that systems replacement will be completed during 1998.
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