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Nzhta Report 2001

#1 User is offline   hillsy 

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Posted 15 February 2006 - 10:04 AM

Posted on behalf of Gaffa_09

November 2001
Arachnoiditis
A brief summary of the literature

(excerpt)
The New Zealand Pain Society was advised of the conclusions and asked to prepare patient information
leaflets with consent forms. Medical practitioners were advised on the use of epidural steroid injections
and responsibility to the patient in a 1998 issue of the Ministry’s publication Prescriber Update.
Neither the route of administration nor indication are approved in New Zealand. The manufacturer,
Upjohn, included an underlined warning that epidural use was not recognised as an indicator for Depo-
Medrol. The 1991 package insert states that epidural use was not recommended. There are provisions
in the Medicines Act 1981 for the administration by a non-approved route and for an unapproved
indication. The code of Health and Disability Services Consumer Rights places responsibility on the
prescribing or administering medical practitioner to advise recipients of expected risks, side effects and
benefits (Right 6(1)(B)). Written consent was also required in experimental treatments (Right 7(6)(B))
which could possibly apply in the case of epidural Depo-Medrol injections.
Patient safety and informed consent issues have appeared more recently in New Zealand medical
literature. The incoming NZMA President, Roy Holmes, raised the patient safety issue in New Zealand,
citing findings from an Australian study of quality healthcare in NSW for NSW where some 16.6% of
admissions were associated with an adverse event, over half judged to have high preventability (Holmes
2000).
Patient safety issues have also made recent news with the results of an Auckland region adverse events
feasibility study (Davis et al. 2001). This showed that medical adverse events were more likely to have
occurred outside hospital, to be drug related, to be associated with acute admission, to be classified as
highly preventable and to have greater impact on hospital stay. Post-lumbar puncture headache was a
common procedure-related adverse event. This can occur following either spinal or epidural
anaesthesia but also following diagnostic procedures such as myelograms. This is caused by leakage of
cerebrospinal fluid into the epidural space and correlates strongly with needle-diameter size and needle
direction and angle. The development of clots after bleeding has been implicated with arachnoiditis but
given the widespread use of epidural blood patches for post-lumbar headache this is unlikely (Parnass
and Schmidt, 1990). The formation of post-lumbar puncture dermoid and epidermoid intradural cysts
has been clearly documented but has not been conclusively shown for intradural arachnoid spinal cysts
(Kriss and Kriss 1997).
Coates and Hill (2001), outline the criteria for obtaining informed consent from women in labour
undergoing epidural analgesia. Three basic criteria for patient consent must be satisfied, patient
competency or legal capacity, adequate patient information (available options, risks and side effects)
and voluntary consent (free from duress). Ideally, patient consent should be obtained in writing by the
anaesthetist after consultation with the patient. This is not legally essential unless a patient is to go
under general anaesthetic, there is significant risk of adverse events, there is participation in research, or
a procedure is experimental. Patient competency due to impairment from pain, fatigue, confusion etc
still gives the right to make informed choice to the extent appropriate to the level of competence
(Coates and Hill 2001). Some debate over what constitutes an acceptable level of risk as it relates to
informed patient consent have also appeared2 and concerns with low risk but the potential for life long
afflictions3.
Various New Zealand support groups within the National Neurological Organisations Network and
disability support networks exist. The central arachnoiditis support group in New Zealand is the
Arachnoiditis Sufferers, Action and Monitoring Society (ASAMS). This was established in 1995
following a TV program about arachnoiditis called A Shot in the Back, and subsequent newspaper
articles. Some 650 inquiries were received by the Wanganui Disability Resources Centre at the time.
The ASAMS provides support for sufferers and caregivers, information on the condition and the
possible dangers of medical procedures linked to arachnoiditis, education of medical professionals
about proper patient informed consent and help to set up similar support groups around New Zealand.
Their web site, which includes extensive resources is at www.aboutarachnoiditis.org.
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#2 User is offline   gaffa09 

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Posted 15 February 2006 - 10:35 AM

Various New Zealand support groups within the National Neurological Organisations Network and
disability support networks exist. The central arachnoiditis support group in New Zealand is the
Arachnoiditis Sufferers, Action and Monitoring Society (ASAMS). This was established in 1995
following a TV program about arachnoiditis called A Shot in the Back, and subsequent newspaper
articles. Some 650 inquiries were received by the Wanganui Disability Resources Centre at the time.
The ASAMS provides support for sufferers and caregivers, information on the condition and the
possible dangers of medical procedures linked to arachnoiditis, education of medical professionals
about proper patient informed consent and help to set up similar support groups around New Zealand.


This part i wish to point out is if reading all info statement made ,
Most new paper articles especially in the beginning also TV 60 minutes and the forming of the group ASAM was carried out by my self . the phoning 60 minutes program getting a group together for a tv interview You got it
NO one has approach me for input, for research, or have even never acknowledge the few years that i put in , go to it ASAM lap it up I mean the glory and power Now what are you doing to help the sufferers please put it up on site for all the read
All this for a shot in the back as well as a stab in the back.
who is paying you
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#3 User is offline   rippedoff 

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Posted 15 February 2006 - 10:37 AM

:o Is the 'New zealand Pain Soceity' just ANOTHER ACCSKUMM SCAMM like the ORIFICIAL PAIN CLINICK in Adelaide road was in the eighties/90's? :rolleyes:
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#4 User is offline   rippedoff 

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Posted 15 February 2006 - 10:40 AM

B) It does truly sound like ACCFRAUD/LYINGSKUMM trying to use a LOT of BIG WORDS,(most of which do not exist!), to LIE their way through OFFICIAL GUMBIMENT FRAUD!! :rolleyes:
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