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Vietnam Veterans Agent Orange

#81 User is offline   doppelganger 

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Posted 24 July 2006 - 08:23 PM

See that national is claiming that they must work with labour.

the time that you all were elected you all have to work together and not fight like the little kids that all of you dragged up.
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Posted 26 July 2006 - 07:00 PM

[COLOR=blue]I am a newbie here, just found this site tonight. Very good site.
My problem is that my husband (who is now deceased as of two years ago due to a violent throat cancer) was a Vietnam veteran who suffered with agent orange.
I was divorced from him about 5 years ago, but am still considered his widow being married to him over 10 years.
He had a son with me, who is now 18 years old and I am concerned about his health also. I would also like to see my son get compensated with the death benefits since his father should qualify as having a disability from the war.
My son's father had orangish yellow skin tone at all times. He talked about agent orange, and told our son that his cancer was from the agent orange from Vietnam.
How do I go about proving it?
He drove a medic truck so he was all over the place on duty. Should I get the records from my local amvets, or where do you suggest?
Will it show where he served and where the spray was administered?
Any help would be appreciated as my son is struggling with many issues.
note: I am not sure if any of his medical records have that report on them, so I understand it will be difficult. Also he did smoke cigarettes for many years and I am sure the doctors could blame it on that exclusively.
Please help, thanks, D. Fowler
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#83 User is offline   Easyrider 

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 09:53 PM

Was your Husband reg no 44178 GHB Fowler who served with 161 battery.
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#84 User is offline   Tomcat 

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Posted 28 July 2006 - 02:42 PM

National News



Agent Orange study to show significant damage

UPDATED 2.15pm Friday July 28, 2006

A report out today was expected to show that all New Zealand Vietnam War veterans exposed to the defoliant Agent Orange may have suffered genetic damage.

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/section/story.cf...jectID=10393422
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#85 User is offline   Easyrider 

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Posted 28 July 2006 - 09:51 PM

If anyone needs a copy of the report email me offline.
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#86 User is offline   gaffa09 

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Posted 02 November 2006 - 06:23 PM

they fought for freedom and get treated like this .

Shame on Goverment
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#87 User is offline   accvictim 

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Posted 03 December 2006 - 09:23 PM

I hope the vets get some justice, this damn country has never been kind to its ex service personnel, those bigoted scum who call themselves parliamentarians are to blame for denying the vets compensation and help, as they are also to blame for ACC and its ruthless treatment of injured claimants.

The govt would sooner spend its ill gotten gains on importing 1000s of aids ridden refugees from some other wretched country.
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#88 User is offline   Easyrider 

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Posted 06 December 2006 - 04:15 PM

Package to be announced tomorrow for the Vietnam Vetrans

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#89 User is offline   Easyrider 

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Posted 07 December 2006 - 04:50 PM

Less than 10% of Vietnam Vets will qualify for the payout. The feeling on the Vietnam Vets forum is they feel they have been shafted again.
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#90 User is offline   Hatikva 

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  Posted 27 January 2007 - 09:47 AM

Yesterday we went to visit our uncle who is in hospital - suffering the effects of exposure to Agent Orange.

He is bedridden, a mere frail shadow of the person who served NZ in Vietnam, who was a member of the Special Services ... and who accompanied the top brass during his military career in addition to serving as a special forces soldier. He was exposed to agent orange during his term in Vietnam ...

Now he is in the last stages of his life, living in pain, in hospital bedridden and knowing that his children (and their children) are now showing the effects of Dioxin poisoning.

There are veiled "promises" of assistance and compensation - whether or not these offers of assistance come to fruition before his life ends remains a sad fact of how poorly NZ treats their ex servicemen ... and their Whanau.

Will uncle survive long enough to know that his children and Tamariki are provided for? The sad answer is probably not. He is tough, and has outlasted many other veterans who have passed on from the adverse effects of agent orange/dioxin poisoning. However this is an insidious disease, destroying the fabric of the body in such a way as to leave one struggling in pain and in constantly declining health.

What a sad saga for those who sought to serve their country, and what a sad and terrible indictment on New Zealand.
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#91 User is offline   Tomcat 

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Posted 21 April 2007 - 08:46 AM

From Xtra...


Friday April 20, 07:12 PM
Research shows genetic damage in Vietnam vets
Enlarge image

A Massey University researcher who last year showed genetic damage to New Zealand sailors exposed to nuclear weapons tests has used a similar approach to show increased rates of genetic damage in Vietnam War veterans.

Dr Al Rowland investigated the rate of "sister chromatid exchange" in veterans' cells -- a test that analysed the way chromosomes replicate --- the journal Cytogenetic and Genome Research reported. It measured levels of breakages in dividing chromosomes in blood lymphocyte cells. He found that NZ soldiers who served in Vietnam had higher levels of genetic damage than soldiers who did not. About 3400 New Zealanders served in Vietnam.

More than 76.5 million litres of herbicides were sprayed over parts of Southern Vietnam and Laos while New Zealand soldiers fought in the Vietnam War from July 1965 until November 1971.

The spray was used to remove forest cover, destroy crops and clear vegetation from around military installations.

The most common of these defoliants -- known as "Agent Orange" -- has been shown to lead to adverse health effects and cause genetic damage in humans.
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A sample group of 24 NZ Vietnam War veterans and 23 "control" volunteers -- soldiers who did not go to Vietnam -- were compared using a sister chromatid exchange (SCE) analysis, which shows up chromosome breakages. The higher the SCE rate, the greater the possibility of genetic damage.

The Vietnam veterans group had "an exceptionally high proportion" (11 percent) of cells with high SCE frequencies compared to the soldiers who did not go there (0.07 percent).

"The NZ Vietnam War veterans studied here were exposed to a harmful clastogenic substance(s) which continues to exert an observable genetic effect today, and suggest that this is attributable to their service in Vietnam," the journal reported.

Long before the study was carried out, veterans in New Zealand, the United States and Vietnam blamed the chemicals for conditions such as leukaemia, soft tissue sarcoma, non- Hodgkin's lymphoma, Hodgkin's disease and chloracne among the Vietnamese people and troops who fought there, and their children.

Successive New Zealand governments said there was no proof that the veterans had been exposed to the chemical spray, or damaged by it, but in 2004, a parliamentary select committee confirmed that Agent Orange was sprayed on New Zealand troops in Vietnam.

Last year the Government announced a $30 million Agent Orange compensation package and apology for veterans and their families.

Many veterans of the war have fought their governments for reparation over exposure to the defoliant and known carcinogen Agent Orange.

Dr Rowland last year published a study of 50 sailors exposed to radiation during nuclear weapons tests in the 1950s, who also showed elevated SCE levels after being deliberately exposed to nuclear radiation near Christmas Island in the Pacific during the 1950s. He found a significant level of genetic damage in the DNA.

* Agent Orange was a chemical mixture of two synthetic herbicides, 2,4-D and 2,4,5-T. One of the chemicals in Agent Orange, 2,4,5-T has the potential to cause cancer and other harmful affects. The use of 2,4,5-T was banned by USA regulators in 1983, but 2,4-D is still made and sold there as a weed killer.

...............................................................................................................................

2 4-D is still being sold here in NZ as a Weed Killer by a major Garden product Name...
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#92 User is offline   Spacecadet 

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Posted 21 April 2007 - 09:53 AM

View PostTomcat, on Apr 21 2007, 08:46 AM, said:

From Xtra...

* Agent Orange was a chemical mixture of two synthetic herbicides, 2,4-D and 2,4,5-T. One of the chemicals in Agent Orange, 2,4,5-T has the potential to cause cancer and other harmful affects. The use of 2,4,5-T was banned by USA regulators in 1983, but 2,4-D is still made and sold there as a weed killer.

...............................................................................................................................

2 4-D is still being sold here in NZ as a Weed Killer by a major Garden product Name...


The garden supply shops sell "Woody Weedkiller" - active ingredient 2 4 D.

Technical comment about Agent Orange. This was not a mixture of 2 4 D and 2 4 5 T as commonly misreported, but a mixture of isomers made in situ. Thus agent orange contained all other isomers as well - hence it was a cheap and dirty mixture of chlorinated phenols, including dioxin.

It follows that the biological effects of agent orange, a very toxic substance, cannot be directly co-related to those of 2 4 5 T or 2 4 D. Although New Zealand was exposed to a very high amount of 2 4 5 T during the 1960s through the 1980's, its was its manufacture at the IWD plant in New Plymouth that posed the greatest risk - and that being the byproduct dioxin - and not the 2 4 5 T itself.

This has only recently been acknowledged by the bureaucrats, and they have managed to used misinformation to justify their inaction for decades. New Zealand is about 30 years behind European counties in identifying chemical environmental risks, and I am sure ACC contribute to this situation, as it is not in ACC's financial interest to expose these hazards.
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#93 User is offline   Easyrider 

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Posted 05 May 2007 - 11:43 PM

Vets and others to sue NZ govt

http://www.litigationnz.com/

Will be in Sunday papers.
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#94 User is offline   flowers 

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Posted 24 December 2007 - 09:44 AM

some interesting info here and there are other threads on agent orange asbestos and chem poisoning.....

http://gunplot.net/g...opic.php?t=3231
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#95 User is offline   flowers 

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Posted 17 April 2008 - 10:38 AM

Some good news and some not so good news.
Science Daily A dioxin toxin contained in the herbicide Agent Orange affects male reproductive health by limiting the growth of the prostate gland and lowering testosterone levels, researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have found in a cohort study of more than 2,000 Air Force veterans who served during the Vietnam War.
The study, published in the November issue of the journal Environmental Health Perspectives, indicates that exposure to TCDD, the most toxic dioxin contained in Agent Orange, may disturb the male endocrine and reproductive systems in several ways.
"Until now, we did not have very good evidence whether or not dioxins affect the human reproductive system," said Dr. Amit Gupta, a urologist at UT Southwestern and the study's lead author. "Now we know that there is a link between dioxins and the human prostate leading us to speculate that dioxins might be decreasing the growth of the prostate in humans like they do in animals."
The researchers found that veterans exposed to dioxin had lower incidence rates of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH), better known as enlarged-prostate disease. BPH is a disease in humans that is caused by an enlargement of the prostate. Patients must strain to pass urine and they also must urinate frequently. BPH can lead to complications such as an inability to urinate and urinary tract infection. Surgery is sometimes needed.
Dr. Claus Roehrborn, professor and chairman of urology at UT Southwestern and a study author, said, "We know that dioxin causes many endocrine disturbances in the human body. The study indirectly proves that BPH is an endocrine disorder."
Regarding the decreased risk for BPH found in the veterans groups, Dr. Gupta cautioned that the finding should not be interpreted as a positive result.
"It may be construed that a decrease in the risk of BPH is not a harmful effect, but the larger picture is that dioxins are affecting the normal growth and development of the reproductive system. Moreover, several effective treatments are available for BPH and thus reduction of BPH by a toxic compound is not a desirable effect."
The study was based on data from the Air Force Health Study (AFHS). The AFHS is an epidemiologic study of more than 2,000 Air Force veterans who were responsible for spraying herbicides including Agent Orange during the Vietnam War. This group is called the Ranch Hand group because the spray program was called Operation Ranch Hand. Agent Orange was contaminated by a dioxin called 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD).
This study also involved a comparison group comprising veterans who served in Southeast Asia during the same time period, 1962-1971, but were not involved in the spraying program and thus were exposed to dioxins at levels equivalent to the general population.
The veterans were interviewed and underwent physical examinations and lab tests during six examination cycles. The first cycle was conducted in 1982, so the veterans were followed for more than 20 years.
"We found that the risk of developing BPH decreased with increasing exposure to dioxins in the comparison group," said Dr. Arnold Schecter, professor of environmental sciences at the UT School of Public Health Regional Campus at Dallas and a study author. "The risk of developing BPH was 24 percent lower in the group with the highest dioxin levels compared to the group with the lowest levels. In the Ranch Hand group, the risk of BPH tended to decrease with increased exposure to dioxins, but at extremely high exposure levels there was a tendency for the risk to increase."
In addition, the study shows that higher dioxin exposure is associated with decreased testosterone levels, Dr. Gupta said.
"It is known that lower testosterone levels are associated with decreased sexual function, decreased muscle mass and strength, infertility, increased fatigue, depression and reduced bone density," Dr. Gupta said. "However, we could not conclude from this study that dioxin exposure did lead to any of these adverse affects in the veterans in the study."
The study points out the necessity to conduct additional environmental studies of the impact of dioxins and other toxins on the male reproductive system. Previous research was largely based on animal models, Dr. Gupta said, noting that the urgency of further research is underlined by a rise in disorders of the male reproductive tract over the past several decades.
These include a decrease in sperm production by almost 50 percent, a three- to four-fold increase in testicular cancer, an increase in the incidence of cryptorchidism (undescended testes, a condition where the testes are not in their normal location in the scrotum) and hypospadias (abnormality of the urethra).
The reason for this increase is not known, but it is thought that these disorders might be caused by environmental chemicals that are estrogenic and have endocrine-disrupting effects, Dr. Gupta said.
Dioxins are among the most toxic substances known and are thought to be partially responsible for this increase in male reproductive tract disorders. They are formed as byproducts of processes such as incineration, smelting, paper and pulp manufacturing and pesticide and herbicide production.
Humans are exposed to these chemicals primarily through consumption of animal fat and dairy products. Babies are exposed to the highest levels of dioxins through breast milk. Dioxins are eliminated extremely slowly from the body and they tend to stay in the body for several years to several decades after exposure.
Other researchers contributing to the study came from the UT Health Science Center at San Antonio and the Air Force Research Laboratory, Brooks City-Base, Texas.
Note: This story has been adapted from a news release issued by UT Southwestern Medical Center.

There is a shit load about this stuff in this thread also viet vets mostly dying or dead from cancers and stuff just check the services websites and see how many have died since from causes although shown as other generally are related pretty consistantly with those that wer exposed to agent orange and symptons lmost always those listed as the effects of that diabodical substance sprayed over friens a foe alike........... http://www.gunplot.net/gbb/viewtopic.php?t...ht=agent+orange
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#96 User is offline   flowers 

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Posted 30 April 2008 - 07:54 AM

http://nz.news.yahoo...429/3/55o2.html
Wednesday April 30, 07:08 AM
Free annual health check-ups for Paritutu residents
The Government would provide free annual health checks to people who lived or worked near or at the former Ivon Watkins Dow agri-chemical plant in the New Plymouth suburb of Paritutu, it said yesterday.

Associate Health Minister Damien O'Connor said the Government acknowledged that people living in the area at the time of high exposure from the plant "may potentially have been exposed to harm" from dioxins.

"While the degree of harm is highly uncertain, it is better to act now to provide some additional help to those who may have been affected."

Mr O'Connor said the Government would provide a new health support service, in line with recommendations made in an independent report.

That report, by Allen and Clarke Policy and Regulatory Specialists, was being released tonight at a public meeting in Taranaki.

Mr O'Connor said the foundation of the health support service, to be implemented by July 1, was a free annual check-up with a GP or practice nurse.

Where appropriate, people would be referred to other services.

These might include medical advice on genetic concerns, referral to primary mental health services, serum dioxin testing (under limited circumstances) and nutrition, exercise and smoking cessation advice.

To access the service, people would have to apply to the Ministry of Health and demonstrate they lived or worked in the area during times "of high exposure".

"Anyone who lived, worked or went to school within 1200 metres downwind (to the east or south) of the plant for one year between 1962 and 1969 or for five years between 1970 and 1987 is eligible for the service," he said.

Green Party health spokeswoman Sue Kedgley said the free annual health checks were better than nothing.

But she questioned why this had taken so long, and why the Government was not apologising to those affected despite years of "denial and cover-up" of the health effects they had suffered.

It had been three years since tests confirmed what many Paritutu residents already knew -- that they were exposed to dangerous chemical dioxin and had dioxin levels significantly above those of the general population, she said.

"Even the Ministry of Health has acknowledged this may result in an up to 10 percent increase above the national cancer mortality rate."

Ms Kedgley said affected residents should get priority specialist follow-up services in the same way Vietnam veterans suffering from dioxin poisoning did.

Workers found to have elevated dioxin levels should get ACC compensation for workplace injury.

Ms Kedgley also said that until the Government apologised, there would be no closure to the sorry saga.

Ivon Watkins-Dow chemical plant, now called Dow Agrosciences, made the herbicide 245-T from 1962 to 1987 and the impact of the chemical on workers and the residents of Paritutu has been much studied and disputed.

The Dow company funded an Otago University study into the effects on employees at the plant.

That showed there was no evidence of increased cancer or disease related to dioxin exposure.

The report said it was very difficult to estimate the degree of increased risk of disease in Paritutu residents as a group or individually.

"...The association between dioxin and many diseases and conditions remains inconclusive".

When they outlined the options for the health support service, the report's authors said it was difficult to make a convincing case for including serum dioxin testing -- which Mr O'Connor said might be used in limited circumstances.

The results of a serum dioxin test could not accurately predict the level of historical exposure and could not deliver a direct health gain, the report said.

"However, returning a low result may offer some comfort to individuals or may spur those with a higher rate to make healthier lifestyle choices."

On the issue of genetic testing, the report said it was not possible to link any specific aspect of DNA damage to historical exposure to dioxin, given that dioxin was not recognised as being directly genotoxic.

Genetic counselling was likely to cover conditions that were not linked to dioxin exposure although it might assist families to understand the relationship between dioxin and birth defects "and to ease anxiety about this".

Both options were severely limited in the availability of services in New Zealand.

The Ministry of Health said individuals wanting information about the health support service could call 0800 288 588.

It was working with other district health boards so similar health services would be available for eligible people who lived out of the Paritutu area.

The Government's stance -- no apology, no compensation and no intention to sue Dow AgroSciences -- has been condemned by Chemically Exposed Paritutu Residents Association (Cepra) spokesman Andrew Gibbs, of New Plymouth.

"This is a small part of the most extensive cover-up New Zealand has ever seen," Mr Gibbs said.

"It's appalling. It is classic public relations strategy."

The issue had passed through the hands of four health ministers since Mr Gibbs first called for an investigation in 2000.

"This is just a public relations scam. All it's done is hurt our town. I can't believe they've done it," he said.

Many of the more than 100 people who packed into the Quality Hotel Plymouth International last night to hear the announcement agreed with Mr Gibbs.

They thought it was too little too late.
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#97 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 26 May 2008 - 01:39 PM

An apology is supposed to be given this week by Ms Clark to Vietnam Veterans , this being the same woman who protested against them in Public for there stand against the way they were treated a few years ago. My what some people do to point score in Election year.
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#98 User is offline   Medwyn 

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Posted 26 May 2008 - 09:40 PM

View Posthukildaspida, on May 26 2008, 01:39 PM, said:

An apology is supposed to be given this week by Ms Clark to Vietnam Veterans , this being the same woman who protested against them in Public for there stand against the way they were treated a few years ago. My what some people do to point score in Election year.

People can make bad judgement calls at the time and I don't think Clark warrants a crticism as there are mayors in this country eg Shadbolt and company who were veteran protesters yet go to RSA and Veterans events.

As one who was in the services waiting for Holyake and his minions to send me there, I was grateful for the protest.

And as a mate of some who went, and are going to Wellington for the apology, yeah I'm ashamed at their treatment, but remember it was a National Government under Holyoake who aquiesed to The Big US and sent troops.

Moral of the story, this last and present century has proven, let the Yanks glory in "Coming in for the Spoils" at the finish, but never get involved in a scrap they start or you'll get crapped on.
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#99 User is offline   fairgo 

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Posted 22 January 2009 - 08:22 PM

The fact that rigorous testing of these mens DNA has shown alterations in itself should be enough to show they have a case for compensation. Good on these guys for keeping on fighting. God knows they have been to hell and back.
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#100 User is offline   doppelganger 

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Posted 27 March 2010 - 04:16 PM

Another Study Links Pesticides to Parkinson's Disease

Susan Jeffrey


September 30, 2009 Results of a case-control study lend more support to the previously reported link between pesticides and Parkinson's disease (PD). The results show that occupational exposure to pesticides was associated with a significantly increased risk for parkinsonism.

"We found that pesticide use overall was associated with almost a 2-fold increased risk of PD and one particular pesticide, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, with about 2.5 times greater risk of PD," Caroline M. Tanner, MD, PhD, from the Parkinson's Institute, Sunnyvale, California, told Medscape Neurology.

"The association of disease risk with pesticides supports a toxicant-induced cause of parkinsonism," the authors conclude.

The report was published in the September issue of the Archives of Neurology.

Associations Inconsistent

Since the discovery that a chemical called 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine could cause parkinsonism, there has been interest in studying the effects of occupational exposures to chemicals on PD risk, Dr. Tanner said. Studies have suggested that occupations such as farming, teaching, and welding may increase the risk for PD, the authors note, but associations have been inconsistent between studies.

One of the problems, Dr. Tanner said, was the methodology. "It's been a long process of refining our methods and finding better ways of collecting information to try to understand this, so that in the last 2 or 3 years, several papers have come out implicating pesticide exposure and increased risk of PD," she said.

In the current study, they wanted to "cast a wide net," she added, looking at the risk for parkinsonism associated with a wide variety of occupations, including agriculture, education, healthcare, welding, and mining, as well as different types of toxicant exposures, including both pesticides and solvents, that have also recently been associated with PD risk.

In addition, she noted, "we wanted to look not just at people with classical parkinsonism but also those with atypical parkinsonism to make sure that we weren't excluding people who might look a little bit different clinically but actually have disease that was potentially caused by some kind of chemical exposure."

Occupational and Job Task Exposures

For cases, the researchers approached 8 movement disorder centers in the United States and Canada and asked investigators there to identify consecutive patients with parkinsonism who were willing to participate and met inclusion criteria. Criteria included having parkinsonism, defined as 2 or more cardinal signs, and diagnosis within 8 years of recruitment. Control subjects were selected from nonblood relatives or acquaintances of the patients.

The researchers then compared lifelong occupational and job task histories between patients with parkinsonism and control participants. "We didn't just ask, did you work as a farmer or a groundskeeper or a janitor or whatever, but what kinds of tasks did you perform over the course of your work, how often did you do it, and for how long?" Dr. Tanner noted.

The researchers also took detailed information on other factors that have been associated with PD risk, including tobacco use, which was also in this study associated with lower PD risk; ever drinking coffee and cumulative coffee intake, which also showed an inverse association of borderline significance; and head injury, which was directly associated with PD in this study, but with wide confidence intervals.

In all, data for 519 patients with parkinsonism and 511 control participants were analyzed. The researchers found no association between work in agriculture, education, healthcare, or welding and an increased risk for parkinsonism. There was what they call an "unexpected" increased risk seen in association with work in legal, construction and extraction, and religious occupations, but these were not maintained after adjustment for duration of disease.

However, risk for parkinsonism was increased with overall pesticide use, use of any 1 of 8 pesticides that have been associated with experimental parkinsonism, and use in particular of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, the authors report.

Risk for Parkinsonism Associated With Pesticide Exposure

Category Odds Ratio 95% CI
Any pesticide use 1.90 1.12 3.21
Use of 1 of 8 pesticides linked to experimental parkinsonism 2.20 1.02 4.75
Use of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid 2.59 1.03 6.48

Three of the individual compounds, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, an organochlorine; paraquat, an herbicide pulled off the market years ago when it was found to cause cancer; and permethrin, an insecticide and acaricide, were associated with a more than 3-fold risk for the disease, "although precision was poor for paraquat and permethrin," the authors write.

Agent Orange

Interestingly, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid is a component of Agent Orange, Dr. Tanner added, which is the herbicide used by the US military during the Vietnam War to strip the jungle canopy and destroy enemy crops between 1962 and 1971. Subsequent to the Agent Orange Act of 1991, Congress directed the Secretary of Veterans Affairs to request that the Institute of Medicine perform a comprehensive ongoing review of any long-term health effects seen in American soldiers from exposure to these herbicides.

On July 24, 2008, the Institute of Medicine released Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 2008, the eighth report in the series. "The authoring committee found suggestive but limited evidence that exposure to Agent Orange and other herbicides used during the Vietnam War is associated with an increased chance of developing ischemic heart disease and Parkinson's disease for Vietnam veterans," notes a summary on the institute's Web site.

Although "suggestive but limited evidence" may sound a tepid assessment, the cumulative evidence linking these conditions to exposure to Agent Orange had been deemed inconclusive before this most recent report.

"It's sort of an interesting coincidence that these 2 things popped up at the same time," Dr. Tanner said, referring to their own findings.

The study was supported by an unrestricted grant from a group of current and former manufacturers of welding consumables awarded to The Parkinson's Institute. Dr. Tanner has disclosed no relevant financial relationships. Coauthor Robert A. Hauser, MD, has received fees for providing expert testimony in cases related to PD in welders.

Arch Neurol. 2009;66:11061113. Abstract

[CLOSE WINDOW]
Authors and Disclosures
Journalist
Susan Jeffrey
Susan Jeffrey is the news editor for Medscape Neurology & Neurosurgery. Susan has been writing principally for physician audiences for nearly 20 years. Most recently, she was news editor for thekidney.org and also wrote for theheart.org; both of these Web sites have been acquired by WebMD. Prior to that, she spent 10 years covering neurology topics for a Canadian newspaper for physicians. She can be contacted at [email protected]

Medscape Medical News 2009 Medscape, LLC
Send press releases and comments to [email protected]
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