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Vietnam Veterans Agent Orange

#61 User is offline   Easyrider 

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Posted 12 January 2005 - 12:05 PM

Ivan if you wish to talk to a Ex Vet who also worked at the plant and made the stuff contact me offline.
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#62 User is offline   ernie 

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Posted 12 January 2005 - 12:50 PM

Corporate Watch once noted "The Five 'D's" of corporations:

Deny [harm],

Delay [solutions],

Divide [opposition],

Dupe [the public]

and then Dump [the product]
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#63 User is offline   ernie 

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Posted 13 January 2005 - 07:28 AM

Was talking to a Vietnam Vet last night who recalls there was a big stink at some stage in the 60s when 6 drums of Agent Orange went overboard off Northland coast while being shipped somewhere (possibly Subic Bay).

He cannot recall a lot of detail, but is trying to check out others who might remember this.
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Posted 16 January 2005 - 09:16 PM

http://www.petitiono...N/petition.html

Justice for Victims of Agent Orange

To: The U.S. President and others

AGENT ORANGE, THE CHEMICAL, has killed, is still killing, and causing great suffering to over three million people in Vietnam.

PLEASE HELP THEM BY SIGNING THIS PETITION.

We welcome and support the Civil Action brought by the Vietnam Association of Victims of Agent Orange/Dioxin, and three Vietnamese victims. The documents have been submitted to a court in New York, on behalf of all affected by the chemicals used by the American Forces in their War on Vietnam.

This will be the first ever such action by Vietnamese victims of Agent Orange in any court of law.

We call upon the U.S. President, Government and the Chemical Companies named as defendants in the documents, to accept their responsibilities for the damage caused by their actions and products, and to pay full compensation to the victims.

Sincerely,



http://www.petitiono...N/petition.html
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#65 User is offline   Ivan 

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Posted 23 January 2005 - 04:13 PM

Agent Orange Speech, Viet Nam
Sue Kedgley MP, Green Party

The 13th Annual Meeting of the Asia Pacific Parliamentary Forum (APPF), Viet Nam, 11th January 2005

Speech by Sue Kedgley, delegate from New Zealand

January 11, 2005.

Mr Chairman, the tragedy of the recent tsunami casts a very long shadow over the beginning of the year. It shows just how fragile and how vulnerable our world is and that no matter how clever and sophisticated our technology, every single member of the human race is totally vulnerable to the forces of nature and this is a very humbling lesson for us all. And as a Green party member of Parliament I hope it will encourage us all to treat nature with greater respect.

On behalf of the people of New Zealand I would like to extend our sincerest condolences to the people and governments of the affected areas. New Zealand has experienced many natural disasters and earthquakes and so we feel real empathy for the victims and both our government and the people of New Zealand have contributed generously.

Experience of disasters has shown that money often dries up when the television cameras have left so it is crucial that we continue our assistance into the future and that we also consider the issue of debt relief or moratorium for the affected countries.

The countries most affected by the tsunami are paying $78 billion annually in interest and repayments on their foreign debt. This dwarfs the amount of disaster relief on offer. It is a travesty that these countries spend $214 million each day in debt repayments when people are dying for lack of food, shelter and water.

Secondly I would like to congratulate the government of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam for their magnificent work in organising this conference, and for their generous hospitality. I would also like to take this opportunity to congratulate the Vietnamese people for their courageous struggle for independence over many decades and indeed centuries.

Like hundreds of thousands of people around the world my first political act at age 18 was to take part in protests against the war in Vietnam and New Zealand’s participation in it and it was a source of shame for me to visit the War Crimes museum in Ho Chi Min city and see New Zealand represented as one of the participants in that pointless and destructive war. I believe it is very appropriate to raise at this session of the forum, being held in Vietnam, an important political issue that is a legacy of that tragic war and that is ongoing plight of the estimated 3.8 million victims of Agent Orange which was sprayed over large areas of Vietnam during this war.

I have had the privilege during my stay in Vietnam to meet with the 1080 committee which is representing the victims of Agent Orange in Vietnam and which is taking a court case seeking compensation for the victims from the companies that manufactured Agent Orange. Our delegation also visited a village where second and third generation children whose parents were doused with Agent Orange live, and we saw at first hand the terrible deformities and terrible suffering they continue to endure.

In New Zealand we have just conducted an investigation into the effects of Agent Orange on our veterans and our government has finally apologised to our veterans for failing to acknowledge the ongoing health effects of Agent Orange.
Our veterans, along with American and Australian veterans have been given some financial compensation as a result of a court case against chemical companies which was settled out of court some years ago. But the Vietnamese victims of Agent Orange have never been compensated for their suffering. So we believe it would be appropriate in this forum to express our solidarity with the Vietnamese victims of Agent Orange and to call on the international community to assist an estimated 3.8 million Vietnamese victims of Agent Orange and to pledge never again to use chemical weapons in warfare.

There are many other issues of concern to us –the spread of HIV/aids in the Pacific, the threat of Bird flu, and the threat of global warming and the rise in ocean levels to small states in the Pacific.

New Zealand has long had a nuclear free policy and it is overwhelmingly supported by the people of New Zealand. Preventing the spread of nuclear weapons and reducing the stockpile of existing weapons is a major goal of New Zealand’s foreign policy. We are gravely concerned that North Korea has reactivated its nuclear programme and renounced its obligations under the Non Proliferation Treaty. We hope this issue will be resolved peacefully by dialogue and for that reason we support North Korea’s participation in a future session of the APPF.

On the issue of terrorism we believe that the battle against terrorism will not be won unless we tackle the causes that feed it. Our failure to resolve the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians, and the huge gap between the rich and poor contributes to the terrorists’ ability to recruit and gain funding and public sympathy. So too does the unlawful detaining of suspected terrorists for long periods of time without trial and the atrocious conditions some are being held in which have screened around the world. We must be careful that in the fight against terrorism we do not erode human rights and we applaud Britain’s highest court which has recently condemned the unlawful detention without trial of suspects in that country.

Finally our government supports and greatly values the APPF and the opportunity it affords for dialogue and debate. We welcome Indonesia’s offer to host the next session of the APPF and we would like to offer to host the 2007 meeting of the APPF.


http://www.greens.or...speech8234.html
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Posted 23 January 2005 - 04:31 PM

nuclear free policy? is it true that a nuclear reactor sits at the base of the wainuiomata hill?
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#67 User is offline   Easyrider 

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Posted 23 January 2005 - 05:41 PM

So we believe it would be appropriate in this forum to express our solidarity with the Vietnamese victims of Agent Orange and to call on the international community to assist an estimated 3.8 million Vietnamese victims of Agent Orange and to pledge never again to use chemical weapons in warfare.

And what about all the Kiwis that have suffered for the past 30 odd years, the Kids and Grandkids of the Vietnam Vets. Once again the Vietnam Vets will get pushed under the carpet. When Sue Kedgley goes out and meets some of the families of the Vietnam Vets with major health problems due to agent orange, and makes sure they get the help they should have, then she can hold her head high. If she needs some names and addresses to go and meet the victims i will be more than happy to pass them on.
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#68 User is offline   ernie 

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Posted 24 January 2005 - 08:30 AM

Apology has veterans ready to sue Government

24.01.05
by Kevin Taylor


Vietnam veterans plan to use a belated apology over their exposure to the
deadly Agent Orange defoliant as proof of Government culpability in a
proposed damages lawsuit.

The apology - tabled in Parliament by Veterans Affairs Minister George
Hawkins on December 14 - is the subject of the first in the Herald's Buried
Treasures series.

Agent Orange campaigner John Moller - a former infantry platoon commander in
the Vietnam War - is concerned it took a parliamentary inquiry to prove New
Zealand veterans had been subject to spraying in the controversial war.

The long-time campaigner for compensation for the health damage the
defoliant has wrought among veterans and their children has legal advice
from New Plymouth lawyer and fellow veteran Barry Henderson.

Mr Moller is considering hiring US or Australian law firms to sue the
Government for compensation.

The legal advice he has received is that the apology means veterans now have
a case for punitive and exemplary damages from the Crown because it was
negligent, lacked a duty of care and concealed evidence.

A spokesman for Mr Hawkins, who was too busy to talk to the Herald, said the
Government had no comment until a lawsuit eventuated.

The apology was accompanied by an official response to nine low-key
recommendations made by the inquiry. They ranged from ensuring veterans and
their children were aware of entitlements to ensuring Veterans Affairs
monitored international research and lists of herbicide-related diseases.

Agent Orange was used to strip forests of foliage to deny the enemy cover
but has since been blamed for a string of health conditions and premature
deaths among veterans of the war both here and overseas, as well as millions
of Vietnamese

The response promised no big changes to current services. The one specific
service offered to veterans is a war disablement pension, a non-means-tested
weekly payment ranging from $8.11 for 5 per cent disability to $285 for the
severest disability.

ACC is not available to veterans, as the scheme was not introduced until
1974 and is not retrospective.

But ACC law specialist John Miller claims a 1992 law change made the scheme
retrospective.

Last week he filed an appeal in the High Court at Wellington against a
district court decision that World War II veteran Stanley Livingston was not
entitled to ACC cover.

Mr Livingston contracted amoebic dysentery in Egypt in 1945, ruining his
health.

Mr Miller said the 1992 law change meant conditions contracted in dangerous
employment before ACC was introduced were covered.

He said if the case succeeded - and the law was not changed - it would have
big implications for Vietnam veterans as they would get ACC cover and be
barred from seeking damages.


http://www.nzherald....jectID=10007814
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#69 User is offline   ernie 

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Posted 24 January 2005 - 08:32 AM

Buried Treasures: Vets hurt by 'Clayton's apology'

24.01.05
By Kevin Taylor



Last month's Government apology to Vietnam veterans - which came as
Parliament was about to go into urgency in the last sitting week of the
year - was a simple two-page statement from Veterans Affairs Minister George
Hawkins.

Attached was a 16-page response to a monster 297-page report by the health
select committee probing the exposure of Kiwi soldiers to the deadly Agent
Orange during the controversial war.

Veterans and their families reacted cynically to the apology, which Prime
Minister Helen Clark left to her struggling minister to give.

RSA president John Campbell said veterans were not so much concerned by the
timing of the apology but who delivered it.

They made the point that in 2002 Helen Clark personally apologised to other
groups - Chinese immigrant workers, Samoans for New Zealand's inept
governance last century and gays. The apology to the Chinese community was
followed by money - a $5 million trust fund to promote the history, culture
and language of the Chinese in New Zealand.

The veterans expected more, particularly after the inquiry confirmed the
soldiers had been sprayed by the defoliant - contrary to an earlier report
to Veterans' Affairs New Zealand.

But Helen Clark did not even rise to her feet as opposition politicians
taunted her about the "Clayton's apology" in Parliament.

Although the RSA doesn't believe in a payout for veterans because of the
difficulty deciding who should get it, the "apology by press release" has
fed others' enthusiasm for Government compensation.

Veterans have always claimed exposure to the defoliant - designed to kill
forests to deny the enemy cover - resulted in widespread illness in both
themselves and their offspring, as well as a disproportionately high death
rate at a young age.

During lengthy hearings, the committee was told that of 814 members of the
Army's 161 Battery - an artillery unit - 134 were known to have died since
the war. Their average lifespan was 51 years and 9 months.

The parliamentary inquiry debunked two previous reports on Agent Orange -
the Reeves report requested by the previous National Government and the more
recent McLeod report.

The McLeod report, written by Deborah McLeod of Otago University's
Wellington School of Medicine, for Veterans' Affairs, said there was no
evidence exposure to chemicals in Vietnam had affected the health of
veterans' children and that Anzac forces generally served in Phuoc Tuy
province where no aerial defoliant spraying occurred.

These contentions outraged veterans, who accused the authors of reinventing
history. Embarrassingly, the Army told the inquiry the province was sprayed
often and Kiwi troops probably had contact with the agent more than 350
times.

More than 30 years on, there should have been no contention about exposure
of New Zealand troops. The frustration felt by veterans is understandable,
and calls for compensation equally so.

The lack of movement on a payout has drawn flak from NZ First and veterans
including Kawerau's outspoken John Moller.

The former president of the now-defunct Vietnam Veterans Association said
veterans and their children should be compensated by the Government for
having to pay thousands of dollars over the years for medical bills.

Mr Moller's legal advice is that after the apology the veterans have a case
for punitive and exemplary damages from the Crown because it was negligent,
lacked a duty of care and concealed evidence.

Other reaction was also negative.

Janet Ross of Katikati said it was hollow and victims of the agent needed
something more tangible.

Her husband, Colonel Alistair Ross, suffered from the effects of the
defoliant and died in September.

"It appears they are just waiting for the veterans to die, so the problem
will go away, but there are many of us who won't let that happen," she said.
"It is hard to believe the Government is sincere, especially when Helen
Clark was one of those who protested against the Vietnam war."

Rotorua 29-year-old Katrina Nicol, whose father Gain served in Vietnam,
suffers from spina bifida and a raft of other health effects.

"Once upon a time I didn't believe in compensation; I just wanted
recognition," she said. "Then I hear about prisoners getting payouts when
some of them did really bad things to get into jail."

Mr Moller is considering legal action using Australian or American lawyers.
But first he wants to clear up whether the agent was made here.

Government officials are looking into the question after renewed publicity
over whether Ivon Watkins Dow (now Dow AgroSciences) made the agent at its
Paritutu, New Plymouth, plant and exported it to the US military.

Dow has denied making the defoliant or exporting its component parts to the
US military, although the company did make both 2,4,5-T and 2,4-D at
Paritutu. A 1989-90 parliamentary inquiry found no conclusive evidence to
substantiate the claim.

But Mr Moller said if the government of the day did in fact supply Agent
Orange such a revelation would strengthen the veterans' case.

NZ First MP Pita Paraone, who made an 11th-hour call for compensation during
the inquiry, believes veterans should get a payout to compensate for medical
bills incurred by them and their children. NZ First will also support a
payout for damages.

The committee made a series of recommendations to improve Government
services to veterans. But while the official response listed current
Government support, it offered no changes to the system. It did not mention
compensation either, and Labour MPs have been quick to point out veterans
did not call for compensation at the inquiry either.

Health select committee chairwoman Steve Chadwick said MPs were surprised
there were no calls by veterans for compensation during the inquiry.

Ms Chadwick, a Labour MP, damns NZ First's compensation call as a "cheap
political ploy".

She believes compensation is not a realistic option anyway.

"There's no price you can put on the effects on those soldiers' lives and
their children. I think we are becoming a society that thinks compensation
is the answer for every victim - and it's not. Often it is about a change in
treatment, or a recognition or open access to new treatment."

Meanwhile, the RSA wants the war pension system improved.

Mr Campbell, himself a Vietnam veteran, said it wanted:

* Free annual medical checks - which should also be extended to veterans of
more recent operations such as Afghanistan or Iraq involving exposure to
toxic substances such as depleted uranium ammunition.

* A modest trust to pay veterans' families where an Agent Orange-related
condition is proven.

* Law changes to enshrine the support currently offered to veterans'
children.

The association is also considering asking Veterans' Affairs to double the
modest disability payments to those suffering proven Agent Orange-related
conditions.

The Government emphasised in its response that veterans could get a war
pension unique in the world because it was based on a reverse onus of proof.
The presumption is that the disability arises from military service unless
proven otherwise.

Children of veterans who suffer spina bifida, cleft lip or palate, acute
myeloid leukaemia or adrenal gland cancer can also get fully-funded care.
Children can also get counselling and support for mental health issues.

The Government claims its services are on par with what Australia offers its
veterans.

Since 1964, veterans of wars have had access to pensions paying anywhere
between $8.11 a week (for 5 per cent disability) to $285 (for the severest
disabilities like having no legs and if aged over 60).

The pension is not income tested, so is on top of other income such as wages
or superannuation. Limited allowances are paid for things like clothing,
travel and funerals.

But Mr Campbell said that was the extent of the benefits, besides what the
public health system offered everybody.

There are overseas precedents for lawsuits. In 1984, US chemical companies,
including Dow, settled out of court with veterans for US$180 million.

Yet in the early 21st century, debate in New Zealand has still centred until
recently on whether our soldiers were even exposed to the defoliant in the
first place.

Agent Orange is an issue governments will have to grapple with for decades,
because its health effects appear to be inter-generational.

WHY THE TIMING?

Opposition politicians claim the Government buried its "threadbare" apology
to Vietnam veterans by deliberately dropping it on December 14 - just before
Parliament went into urgency to rush through pre-Christmas legislation.

Under Parliament's rules the Government had 90 days from the release of a
damning select committee report into Agent Orange on October 6 to give its
response.

But a spokesman for Veterans Affairs Minister George Hawkins - who would not
personally front up - rubbishes the opposition claims.

"If we'd waited the full 90 days it would have been January 6, and why would
you release anything then when you had the opportunity to release the
Government response before that?" said Francis Wevers.

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/index.cfm?c_id=5...jectID=10007801
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#70 User is offline   ernie 

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Posted 24 January 2005 - 09:40 AM

Re my earlier post:

Quote

Was talking to a Vietnam Vet last night who recalls there was a big stink at some stage in the 60s when 6 drums of Agent Orange went overboard off Northland coast while being shipped somewhere (possibly Subic Bay).

He cannot recall a lot of detail, but is trying to check out others who might remember this.
Another Vietnam Vet I have talked to thinks the stuff ended up in the drink at Opua Wharf. I'm wondering if anyone in Forum with connections in the North knows anyone who worked at Opua at the time, and may know something about this.
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#71 User is offline   ernie 

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Posted 25 January 2005 - 08:07 AM

PM should apologise, say Vietnam vets

25.01.05

By KEVIN TAYLOR


A formal apology by Prime Minister Helen Clark to a gathering of Vietnam
veterans is being sought by the Ex-Vietnam Services Association.

Association spokesman John Dow said he was waiting to finalise a meeting
with Helen Clark's office on how to conduct a formal apology to veterans for
exposure to the defoliant Agent Orange.

He believed Helen Clark should give a formal apology in front of as many
veterans as possible, and suggested Parliament grounds as a venue.

Veterans Affairs Minister George Hawkins last month issued a press statement
with an apology for the failure of successive governments to recognise that
veterans were exposed to a "toxic environment" in Vietnam.

But the Prime Minister said "she was not aware" of any approach by the
association, and did not want to discuss the issue through the news media.

The apology issued by Mr Hawkins came with a 16-page response to the health
select committee's inquiry into the exposure of defence personnel to Agent
Orange.

The committee called only for acceptance that exposure occurred, not an
apology, but the Government offered one anyway.

However, the Herald yesterday reported widespread unhappiness among veterans
that the Prime Minister had not apologised herself.

They point out that she personally apologised in 2002 to Chinese immigrant
workers, gays and Samoans for their treatment.

Mr Dow said the Prime Minister should be the one to make the apology because
of the importance and seriousness of the issue given the 30 years of
"neglect and denial" over Agent Orange.

"It should be done in a formal public setting which provides the potential
for the maximum number of veterans to attend, so we are not talking about 20
people in a room somewhere."

Mr Dow said underpinning an apology should be improved services for veterans
such as free annual medical checks.

However, the association did not support some veterans' calls for the
Government to pay compensation.

http://www.nzherald....jectID=10007936
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Posted 25 January 2005 - 09:40 AM

Apology has veterans ready to sue Government

24.01.05
by Kevin Taylor

Vietnam veterans plan to use a belated apology over their exposure to the deadly Agent Orange defoliant as proof of Government culpability in a proposed damages lawsuit.

The apology - tabled in Parliament by Veterans Affairs Minister George Hawkins on December 14 - is the subject of the first in the Herald's Buried Treasures series.

Agent Orange campaigner John Moller - a former infantry platoon commander in the Vietnam War - is concerned it took a parliamentary inquiry to prove New Zealand veterans had been subject to spraying in the controversial war.

The long-time campaigner for compensation for the health damage the defoliant has wrought among veterans and their children has legal advice from New Plymouth lawyer and fellow veteran Barry Henderson.

Mr Moller is considering hiring US or Australian law firms to sue the Government for compensation.

The legal advice he has received is that the apology means veterans now have a case for punitive and exemplary damages from the Crown because it was negligent, lacked a duty of care and concealed evidence.

A spokesman for Mr Hawkins, who was too busy to talk to the Herald, said the Government had no comment until a lawsuit eventuated.

The apology was accompanied by an official response to nine low-key recommendations made by the inquiry. They ranged from ensuring veterans and their children were aware of entitlements to ensuring Veterans Affairs monitored international research and lists of herbicide-related diseases.

Agent Orange was used to strip forests of foliage to deny the enemy cover but has since been blamed for a string of health conditions and premature deaths among veterans of the war both here and overseas, as well as millions of Vietnamese

The response promised no big changes to current services. The one specific service offered to veterans is a war disablement pension, a non-means-tested weekly payment ranging from $8.11 for 5 per cent disability to $285 for the severest disability.

ACC is not available to veterans, as the scheme was not introduced until 1974 and is not retrospective.

But ACC law specialist John Miller claims a 1992 law change made the scheme retrospective.

Last week he filed an appeal in the High Court at Wellington against a district court decision that World War II veteran Stanley Livingston was not entitled to ACC cover.

Mr Livingston contracted amoebic dysentery in Egypt in 1945, ruining his health.

Mr Miller said the 1992 law change meant conditions contracted in dangerous employment before ACC was introduced were covered.

He said if the case succeeded - and the law was not changed - it would have big implications for Vietnam veterans as they would get ACC cover and be barred from seeking damages.

http://www.nzherald....jectID=10007814


good on them, a problem is if acc are forced to accept claims - thn the companies at fault get off scot free - and are then still able to dump any toxic product onto the market or in the supermarket with little fear of being held to account - nz laws are an ass imho they could be improved for public safety and real penalties of compensation not this silly 80% (then take off what winz/ird and any other method acc can find to reduce -thats not real compensation imho - the damage goes far deeper.)
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Posted 26 January 2005 - 11:25 AM

Agent Orange papers released

26.01.05 11.45am

Defence Minister Mark Burton today released historic documents relating to the alleged manufacture of Agent Orange in New Zealand.

It was recently claimed that two ingredients 2,4,5-T and 2,4-D -- used in the manufacture of Agent Orange -- were produced by chemical company Ivon Watkins Dow (now called Dow AgroSciences) and exported from Taranaki in the 1960s bound for an American military base in the Philippines.
The Government had looked at the claims and instructed Defence Ministry personnel to search historical records and files for any relevant material. That material was released today.

"In the apparent absence of any new evidence, it seems that the 1989 select committee inquiry still provides the most comprehensive response to the question of whether or not Agent Orange was manufactured in New Zealand," Mr Burton said in a statement.

That inquiry, conducted by the foreign affairs, defence and trade committee, concluded that evidence as to whether New Zealand had any involvement in the manufacture of Agent Orange used in the Vietnam War was inconclusive.

"Their examination of the evidence at the time confirmed that Ivon Watkins Dow shipped some material to the United States during 1967 and 1968 but that it was not the type used in, or capable of being converted to the type used in, Agent Orange," he said.

Papers released today included documents originally released in 1989 under the Official Information Act, the select committee report and submissions to the inquiry. Most were already in the public arena.

http://www.nzherald....jectID=10008124



Quote

In the apparent absence of any new evidence

were pertinant documents previously destroyed?
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Posted 26 January 2005 - 06:13 PM

Govt's PR stunt belittles Agent Orange concerns
Wednesday, 26 January 2005, 4:27 pm
Press Release: Green Party

Wednesday, 26 January 2005

Govt's PR stunt belittles Agent Orange concerns

Green MP Sue Kedgley has labelled the Government's "release" today of documents relating to Agent Orange as "a PR stunt".

"This is an attempt by the Government to sideline the very real concerns of Kiwi veterans and ordinary Vietnamese people about the possible export from New Zealand of ingredients used to make Agent Orange," Ms Kedgley, Green Health Spokesperson said.

"Defence Minister Mark Burton is pretending to be open and transparent by making a big song and dance today about 'releasing' official papers relating to the Agent Orange issue.

"However, the fact is that the vast majority of these papers were already in the public arena, so Mr Burton has not been 'releasing' anything of significance today. Rather, he has simply reheated old, inconclusive information in a vain attempt to spin a decidedly uncomfortable issue for the Government."

Ms Kedgley, who was in Vietnam earlier this month to speak to an international conference about Agent Orange, is calling on the Government to release any and all information it holds - whether Cabinet papers, memoranda, policy advice documents, or communication between and within government agencies- about the issue of Agent Orange..
"It is only when every last piece of paper is released that the full truth will emerge and New Zealand veterans will be able to have peace of mind. Such full disclosure is also vital if New Zealand's reputation in Vietnam is to be in any way restored.

"How can we trust the word of government officials when there has been a history of procrastination and obfuscation over this issue? We need to see all of the papers ourselves so we can make up our own minds."

ENDS
http://www.scoop.co....0501/S00232.htm
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Posted 03 February 2005 - 11:10 PM

very good find :huh:

i might dig out the documents on rimpac. theres a few.
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#76 User is offline   Ivan 

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Posted 04 February 2005 - 09:48 AM

Not the same D Brash, I fear.

The current Leader of the National Party was a 20 year old economics student at the University of Canterbury in 1960. Also, I can't imagine that he would have had as little hair 45 years ago as he does now.
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Posted 26 March 2006 - 08:34 AM

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Cancer-stricken Kiwi war vet speaks out
26 March 2006
By KRISTIAN SOUTH

EXCLUSIVE
Hero medic John "Doc" Mountain risked his life to save young Kiwi soldiers on the hellish battlefields of the Vietnam War.

But the retired New Zealand Army warrant officer fears he and the troops he treated have been betrayed by their own government.

Breaking his silence after 35 years, Doc has told Sunday News how medical records he compiled during the war showing symptoms of Agent Orange poisoning were wiped from official Army records.

Doc's claims include:

Scores of Kiwi troops he treated in Vietnam displayed a strange, agonising body rash that didn't match any of the heat or fungal infections commonly contracted in the South-East Asian country. The rash didn't respond to treatment.

Infected troops were later diagnosed as having chloro-acne and chemical dermatitis - symptoms of exposure to dioxin, the noxious component of Agent Orange.

That when he attempted to recheck his field medical records notes 10 years after the war ended, Doc witnessed notes on the mystery rashes being removed by a team of defence force clerks.

Doc's bombshell claims will be included in a Government-ordered report into possible compensation for Agent Orange exposure, which will be presented to Prime Minister Helen Clark next month.

But in a further shocking twist, evidence given by Vietnam vets for the report will be embargoed for 30 years - meaning most of the war-time heroes will be dead before their stories can be told publicly.

Doc - who spoke to Sunday News at his Brisbane home - provided us with a sworn affidavit to back up his tale of "treachery", which began when he was reunited with an infected Kiwi soldier. Ten years after the end of the war, the trooper still had the mystery toxic rash.

"I asked him if the lesions were from the undiagnosed rash he had experienced in Vietnam and he indicated that they were and that another doctor had diagnosed it as chloro-acne," Doc said.

Still employed as an Army medic, Doc went to check on the soldier's medical file for the notes he'd written about the rash during the war. But the records had disappeared.

Astounded, Doc visited the Army's Wellington medical office to inquire about the missing information.

He said he was stunned to find a defence force clerical team in the process of updating Vietnam veterans' field medical notes -without transferring any reference to the mystery rashes.

"For some reason, information on the skin rashes never made the transition," Doc said.

"I don't know if it was a major stuff up by the defence department, or if it was the deliberate purging of information regarding exposure to Agent Orange, but all that information has gone missing.

"That information would go a long way to proving we were exposed to Agent Orange."

Doc said he tried to raise the removal of his medical notes with superiors several times but "never got a satisfactory answer". He eventually left the service in despair.

He said he is speaking out now because he is riddled with cancer and has been told he only has three years to live.

"I want to blow the whistle on this while I still have the breath," Doc said.

He points out that at the time he witnessed the removal of files, a massive lawsuit was filed against the US to pay for the damages caused to Agent Orange victims.

Another 15 infected Vietnam vets spoken to by Sunday News say they have been told by the Army there is no record of their mystery rashes. But they all remember notes being taken during their war-time medical examinations of the infections.

Fellow Vietnam medic Heta Heta - who also kept notes on the troops' rashes in Vietnam - said he too was infected with the mysterious war-time skin disease.

"My legs still crawl as if there is something under the skin. Every night I wake up and feel it," said Heta, who now lives in Brisbane.

"It's just there, I wake up in the morning and go, `Sh*t it's there'. I go to bed at night and go, `Sh*t, it's still there'.

"My GP looks at it and tells me there's nothing he can do about it, so I don't even mention it any more."

Wanganui vet Garry Manning has been diagnosed with chemical dermatitis.

"I've had it since I returned from Vietnam," Garry said. "I don't keep chemicals in the house because it flares it up. If I scratch myself in my sleep I wake up and my bedding is covered in blood. It's awful."

Vietnam rifleman Bruce Isbister says his rash is so bad he can't swim in chlorinated pools or work with cleaning agents as they leave him covered in the deep red rash.

"It itches like crazy and oozes. It's absolutely maddening and debilitating."

Bruce, who is on a war pension, can't afford to be checked for dioxin poisoning. The tests would cost thousands of dollars."

Agent Orange defoliant was used by America and its allies in the war to clear foliage used as cover by
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#78 User is offline   gaffa09 

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Posted 31 March 2006 - 01:45 PM

This is criminal , fraud , corrupt , call it what you like but all is linked ,
Agent Orange, chemical poisons, lead poisons , drug companies ,medical profession ACC government
Lets see if we can link all together ban together , lets all march on parliament , arrange for the biggest uprising this country has ever seen , show the world what a small country can do
Bring this government to there knees and those that don’t listen Lets shame them into doing something We have to have some sort of action in numbers .
It is not only us that is suffering but families children the generations to come ,
It is the polities that has gone mad the power , the money . The oil, the cover-ups
What are you going to label me as now a radical Well so be it .
You are all generating HATE, HATRED , CONTEMPT, LACK OF TRUST,
Destroying whole families No security left government has destroyed that , so has ACC , No trust left in the medical profession , the legal profession, no justice ,the court system a mockery ..

This is enough for me for today, brain in overload
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#79 User is offline   Tomcat 

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Posted 23 July 2006 - 06:34 PM

Battle almost over for war veterans
23 July 2006
By JENNY MACINTYRE

Vietnam war veterans are expected to be told on Friday that their exposure to Agent Orange and other herbicides might have damaged their DNA.

http://www.stuff.co.nz/stuff/sundaystartim...43a6442,00.html

..............................................................................
Report may show DNA damage in Vietnam vets

1.00pm Sunday July 23, 2006

A report to be released this week is expected to say that Vietnam war veterans exposed to Agent Orange and other herbicides might have damaged their DNA.

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/section/story.cf...jectID=10392575
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#80 User is offline   Easyrider 

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Posted 24 July 2006 - 06:46 AM

http://www.stuff.co.nz/stuff/sundaynews/0,...2a15596,00.html
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