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Vietnam Veterans Agent Orange

#41 User is offline   doppelganger 

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Posted 09 January 2005 - 08:55 PM

New Zealand blamed for distributing Agent Orange
In New Zealand, a Government Minister has claimed the country supplied the highly-toxic chemical, Agent Orange to the United States during the Vietnam War.

The allegations have been made by Transport Minister Harry Duynhoven - and if found to be true, could place New Zealand in breach of the Geneva Convention, exposing it to a raft of lawsuits from Vietnam War veterans.

Mr Duynhoven says Agent Orange was shipped from New Plymouth to a US base at Subic Bay in the Philippines during the 1960s.

He has made the claims in New Zealand's Sunday News newspaper.

Under the Geneva Convention, countries cannot be party to chemical warfare and must declare the use or supply of defoliants during conflicts.
ABC Asia Pacific TV / Radio Australia

http://www.abcasiapacific.com/news/stories...ofi_1279043.htm

and Australia.

Just wait and see what happens when America wakes up.
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Posted 10 January 2005 - 02:28 AM

NZ 'did supply agent orange'
John Moller
John Moller

09.01.05 2.05pm

UPDATE - Apparent confirmation that New Zealand was involved in supplying the deadly Agent Orange defoliant completes a jigsaw for Vietnam War veterans.

Transport Minister Harry Duynhoven has acknowledged the chemical was sent to a US base from Port Taranaki in the 1960s, after sighting documents produced by the veterans, it has been reported.

Veterans spokesman John Moller says it is only a partial victory in their decades-long campaign for recognition.

He says successive governments must have known what happened, and this may explain their reluctance to front up about the effect Agent Orange had on the soldiers.

He says it is too polite to say the veterans have been misled, because they have provided plenty of evidence in the past, and it has been ignored.

John Moller says families with affected children must be given compensation, and it is now up to individual veterans to decide if they want to pursue legal claims against the Crown.

He says he has had all the pieces of the jigsaw for a long time, but it has taken the help of a Sunday newspaper journalist to fit them together.

The National Party is alleging a cover-up after the apparent admission. Use of the deadly defoliant, and the consequences for soldiers exposed to it, have been the subject of a decades' long battle for veterans of the conflict.

National's Health spokeswoman, Judith Collins, says she cannot understand why Mr Duynhoven did not tell a recent select committee about New Zealand's involvement, if he knew.

She says if information has been withheld from the committee, all it has achieved is to slow the process of getting recognition for the veterans.

Ms Collins says it is mysterious why this information is surfacing now. She says we need to find out how much the Cabinet knew about what Mr Duynhoven is saying.

- NEWSTALK ZB

http://www.nzherald....bjectID=9006015
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#43 Guest_IDB_*

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Posted 10 January 2005 - 02:47 AM

Last Update: Sunday, January 9, 2005. 4:00pm (AEDT)
NZ admits supplying Agent Orange during war

A Government Minister says that New Zealand supplied Agent Orange chemicals to the United States military during the Vietnam War.

The disclosure led to immediate claims that New Zealand was in breach of the Geneva Convention and could face a flood of lawsuits from veterans and Vietnamese.

Transport Minister Harry Duynhoven says the highly toxic chemical was sent to a United States base in the Philippines during the 1960s.

"The information that has been given to me is that products used to make Agent Orange were shipped from New Plymouth to Subic Bay in the Philippines," he told the Sunday News newspaper.

After nearly three decades of official denials, a high-level parliamentary committee formally acknowledged late last year that New Zealand soldiers in the Vietnam War were significantly exposed to Agent Orange.

However, no mention was ever made that the country was a supplier.

Although the National Party was in power during the Vietnam War, Mr Duynhoven says his current Labour Government is responsible for setting the record straight.

"Any government has to deal with the situation it finds itself in and it's always a problem if previous governments leave a mess," he said.

Veterans spokesman John Moller says that the Government must compensate ex-soldiers and their families, some of whom have suffered generations of health problems.

"It's bloody unacceptable what the New Zealand Government has done to us and the other countries involved in the war," he said.

"Through their deceit, cover-up and negligence, the New Zealand Government has the blood of thousands of Kiwis, Vietnamese, Australians and Americans on their hands."

Under the Geneva Convention, countries cannot be party to chemical warfare and must declare the use or supply of defoliants during conflicts.

The vice-chancellor of Canterbury University, Scott Davidson, an authority on international law, says the Government had left itself open to lawsuits from Vietnamese.

US lawyer Constantine Kokkoris, who represents Vietnamese victims of Agent Orange, says he may sue the New Zealand Government.

"It is my intention at this time to look into the possibility of bringing a class against against the New Zealand government," he told the Sunday News.

Mr Davidson says if negotiations broke down, the United Nations could be called on to find a setting for a court case.

From 1961 to 1971, the US and South Vietnamese military sprayed millions of litres of toxic herbicides, mainly Agent Orange, over South Vietnam to destroy the vegetation used by communist forces for cover and food.

Vietnam says the defoliant has caused health problems for more than 1 million Vietnamese and continues to have devastating consequences.

A study released in August last year by scientists from the United States, Germany and Vietnam found that Agent Orange is still contaminating people through their food.

Dioxin, the defoliant's deadly component, can cause an increased risk of cancers, immunodeficiencies, reproductive and developmental changes, nervous system problems and other health problems.

- AFP
http://www.abc.net.a...01/s1279024.htm
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#44 User is offline   doppelganger 

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Posted 10 January 2005 - 05:17 PM

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Published on TaipeiTimes
http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/world/arch...1/10/2003218803

New Zealand supplied Agent Orange

TOXIC: The government has acknowledged its role in supplying the chemicals to a US base during the war in Vietnam, and a class suit action appears to be imminent

AFP , AUCKLAND
Monday, Jan 10, 2005,Page 5

Advertising New Zealand supplied Agent Orange chemicals to the US military during the Vietnam war, a government minister has revealed.
The disclosure led to immediate claims that New Zealand was in breach of the Geneva convention and could face a flood of lawsuits from veterans and Vietnamese.

Transport Minister Harry Duynhoven said the highly toxic chemical was sent to a US base in the Philippines during the 1960s.

"The information that has been given to me is that products used to make Agent Orange were shipped from New Plymouth to Subic Bay in the Philippines," he told the Sunday News newspaper.

After nearly three decades of official denials, a high-level parliamentary committee formally acknowledged late last year that New Zealand soldiers in the Vietnam War were significantly exposed to Agent Orange, but no mention was ever made that the country was a supplier.

Although the National Party was in power during the Vietnam War, Duynhoven said his current Labor government was responsible for setting the record straight.

"Any government has to deal with the situation it finds itself in and it's always a problem if previous governments leave a mess."

Veterans spokesman John Moller said the government must compensate ex-soldiers and their families, some of whom have suffered generations of health problems.

"It's bloody unacceptable what the New Zealand government has done to us and the other countries involved in the war," he said.

"Through their deceit, cover-up and negligence, the New Zealand government has the blood of thousands of Kiwis, Vietnamese, Australians and Americans on their hands."

Under the Geneva Convention, countries cannot be party to chemical warfare and must declare the use or supply of defoliants during conflicts.

The vice-chancellor of Canterbury University, Scott Davidson, an authority on international law, said the government had left itself open to lawsuits from Vietnamese. US lawyer Constantine Kokkoris, who represents Vietnamese victims of Agent Orange, said he may sue the New Zealand government.

"It is my intention at this time to look into the possibility of bringing a class against against the New Zealand government," he said

Davidson said if negotiations between Kokkoris and the government broke down, the UN could be called on to find a setting for a court case.

From 1961 to 1971, the US and South Vietnamese military sprayed millions of liters of toxic herbicides, mainly Agent Orange, over South Vietnam to destroy the vegetation used by communist forces for cover and food.

Hanoi says the defoliant has caused health problems for more than one million Vietnamese and continues to have devastating consequences. A study released last year found that Agent Orange was still contaminating people through their food. Dioxin, the defoliant's deadly component, can cause an increased risk of cancers, immunodeficiencies, reproductive and developmental changes, nervous system and other health problems.
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Posted 10 January 2005 - 07:05 PM

NZ First Calls For Release Of Chemical Documents
Monday, 10 January 2005, 3:11 pm
Press Release: New Zealand First Party

10 January 2005

NZ First Calls For Release Of Chemical Documents

New Zealand First has called on the Government to release all official documents relating to the export of Ivor Watkins Dow chemicals that could have been used to manufacture the defoliant agent orange.

Defence spokesperson Ron Mark says it has been proved that New Zealand soldiers who served in Vietnam came in contact with the defoliant and it is important to ascertain if they were affected by chemicals made in their own country.

“It should be very simple to find out whether chemicals manufactured in New Zealand were exported to United States facilities to create agent orange.

“There should be some very clear papers trails leading from the company office in New Plymouth through customs and in various freight documents that should still be available.”

Mr Mark says there should also be cabinet records of the years 1965-72 when the chemicals were manufactured and exported under the National government of the time.

“There has always been a strong suspicion that a company in New Zealand helped make agent orange and we need to confirm this one way or the other.

“Successive National and Labour governments have failed to look at this sorry chapter in our history and it is time they re-opened the old files and explained what really happened,” said Mr Mark.

ENDS

http://www.scoop.co....0501/S00044.htm
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Posted 10 January 2005 - 07:06 PM

Agent Orange Denials Exposed By MP – NZ First
Monday, 10 January 2005, 12:14 pm
Press Release: New Zealand First Party

10 January 2005

Agent Orange Denials Exposed By MP – NZ First

New Zealand First says the latest revelations in the agent orange saga show that successive National and Labour governments have kept passing the buck over the shabby treatment of Vietnam veterans.

This follows reports that officials will investigate a statement by government minister and New Plymouth MP Harry Duynhoven that Ivor Watkins Dow exported the components of the defoliant Agent Orange for use in the Vietnam War.

Veterans affairs spokesperson Bill Gudgeon says it is shameful that despite all the evidence presented to various parliamentary committees, some vital facts about the manufacture of the chemicals have been kept from the public and particularly the Vietnam veterans.

“Incidents of ill health at Paritutu have highlighted some of the concerns of the veterans and this cannot simply be coincidence.

“The soldiers who came into contact with agent orange have been caught in no-man’s land, continually denied compensation by successive governments which have refused to look closely at what happened in this country during the time of the Vietnam war.

“It is time for some questions to be answered and time for the old files to be reopened so the truth can come out for the sake of everyone – especially the veterans and their families,” said Mr Gudgeon.

ENDS



http://www.scoop.co....0501/S00034.htm
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#47 Guest_IDB_*

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Posted 10 January 2005 - 07:06 PM

Govt hides NZ link to Agent Orange
Monday, 10 January 2005, 8:55 am
Press Release: New Zealand National Party


Govt hides NZ link to Agent Orange

National Party Deputy Leader Gerry Brownlee wants to know how long the current Government has known of New Zealand’s involvement with the manufacture of Agent Orange.

Senior Cabinet Minister, Harry Duynhoven, today confirmed that New Zealand was involved with the manufacture of Agent Orange during the Vietnam War.

“The question is, did Mr Duynhoven knowingly hide this information from the select committee inquiry into Agent Orange and the exposure of kiwi troops to it?” asks Mr Brownlee.

“Surely Mr Duynhoven wasn’t the only member of Cabinet to have this information. Helen Clark must front up and tell us if she knew, how long she has known and how long she intended to sit on the information for.

“It seems unlikely that the public would have ever been told about this if not for the work of an investigative journalist.

“Victims of Agent Orange who fought for years to be acknowledged will be devastated to learn that this Government has been more concerned with covering its own tracks than recognising the health concerns of veterans and their children,” says Mr Brownlee.

http://www.scoop.co....0501/S00029.htm
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#48 User is offline   ernie 

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Posted 10 January 2005 - 10:02 PM

Yeah, goodo, Gerry.

Given that it was the National Party, of which Gerry Brownlee is now deputy leader, that was in Government for the entirety of New Zealands involvement in the Vietnam War, when the shit was being manufactured, I would not have thought Gerry would be trying to point the finger on this one.
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#49 User is offline   greg 

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Posted 11 January 2005 - 05:40 AM

Wasn't this stuff shipped via a south american country so as to diguise
the country of manufacture as it was against some war conventions.

Brownlie is suffering from the normal complaint/ forgot who was lying at
the time over which coverup. :lol: :angry: :lol:
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#50 User is offline   Accme 

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Posted 11 January 2005 - 07:36 AM

:rolleyes: Wasn't National in power at the time :lol:
Rules of engagement , How to bite your own arse :lol: :lol: :lol:
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#51 User is offline   flowers 

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Posted 11 January 2005 - 07:58 AM

What was Bill Birch's involvement with Ivor Watkins Dow???
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#52 User is offline   Easyrider 

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Posted 11 January 2005 - 09:03 AM

Sent: Monday, January 10, 2005 8:13 PM
Subject: The Agent Orange Inquiry TV3 News Item This Day.


Rather a damp squid I thought but then there are other ways of skinning skunks.For the record in 1991 myself and a group of veterans including a barrister had a meeting with Winston Peters in his Grey St. Tauranga Office.I asked Winston the direct question as to where the Agent Orange for use in Vietnam had been made in New Zealand. His reply was BEACHLANDS. I was not too sure what he had said so asked the question again and the succint answer was, BEACHLANDS. This took place at the end of the meeting where we had been discussing the plight of veterans and their families.

Later, we veterans sat outside and discussed where BEACHLANDS was and came to the conclusion that this was in the Auckland area.I have today spoken to two members who were present at that meeting and they confirmed to me Winston's reply.During the TV3 Interview this day I raised this point but one notes with interest that it was not used in the news item.

I am bringing this matter to the attention of Ron Mark, Bill Gudgeon and Pita Parone of New Zealand First who will no doubt discuss the matter with Winston.


Cheers John Moller.
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Posted 11 January 2005 - 10:28 AM

Government probes claims NZ exported Agent Orange

11.01.05
by Kevin Taylor

Government officials started looking afresh in November at a claim that Agent Orange ingredients were made here and shipped to the US military, Defence Minister Mark Burton has revealed.

He said the Government wanted to thoroughly investigate the renewed claim about Agent Orange - blamed for health problems suffered by Vietnam War veterans and their children here and overseas, as well as millions of Vietnamese.

The issue was re-ignited after the Sunday News quoted Government minister and New Plymouth MP Harry Duynhoven saying he had information the ingredients of Agent Orange were shipped from Taranaki in the 1960s to the American military base at Subic Bay in the Philippines for the war.

The defoliant is a 50:50 mix of the pesticides 2,4,5-T and 2,4-D - both of which were made at the Ivon Watkins Dow (now Dow AgroSciences) plant at Paritutu in New Plymouth.

A 1990 parliamentary select committee inquiry into whether the product was made here found no conclusive evidence to substantiate the claim.

Mr Duynhoven was in Europe yesterday and could not be reached. But the MP has made the claim before - during a parliamentary inquiry into Agent Orange's effects on veterans and their children.

According to the transcript of a December 2003 inquiry sitting, Mr Duynhoven asked retired Army colonel Raymond Seymour if he remembered the name Subic Bay as a transport route by which the chemicals might have come. Colonel Seymour said he did not.

Mr Duynhoven then said: "OK, because a lot of chemical product was shipped from New Plymouth to Subic Bay around that time. It would be interesting to know what became of it."

Dow AgroSciences New Zealand general manager Peter Dryden yesterday repeated the company's long-standing denial that it made Agent Orange here or supplied the ingredients to the US military.

The 1990 inquiry came after Vietnam Veterans Association claims that official statistics and publications showed Agent Orange was made and supplied by New Zealand during the war. However, Customs told the probe there were no longer export records from the era.

Green MP Sue Kedgley, in Vietnam for a parliamentary conference, said the story had made the Vietnamese media yesterday and New Zealand must apologise to the Vietnamese.

National deputy leader Gerry Brownlee said the Government had to make its position clear and an inquiry should not take very long.

Mr Burton said that John Moller, president of the now-defunct association, wrote to Attorney-General Margaret Wilson in October renewing the claim and suggested it would place New Zealand in a difficult legal position because it was a signatory to the Geneva Protocol prohibiting the use or supply of chemical weapons.

Mr Burton said he told officials in early November to investigate and that work was continuing. He would not put a time on when it might be finished.

What they said

* 'It is most likely that components of Agent Orange were manufactured and supplied by Ivon Watkins Dow.' - Vietnam Veterans Association of New Zealand submission.

* 'Ivon Watkins Dow never manufactured Agent Orange nor did it supply any chemicals to the United States Department of Defence.' - Ivon Watkins Dow submission.

* 'Evidence provided ... as to whether Agent Orange was manufactured in New Zealand during the Vietnam War was inconclusive.' - Inquiry finding.

- From the 1990 parliamentary inquiry into whether Agent Orange was made in NZ

http://www.nzherald....bjectID=9006182
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#54 User is offline   ernie 

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Posted 11 January 2005 - 03:06 PM

Not BEACHLANDS, Winston. Nice try, but no banana.

Try BACK BEACH.

89 Paritutu Road, Back Beach, New Plymouth, to be specific - the location of the Dow chemical plant.

Mind you, easy to get them confused after a few whiskies.
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#55 User is offline   ernie 

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Posted 11 January 2005 - 03:25 PM

When we moved to the neighbourhood in 1970, the city stopped at our street, which roughly formed a ring road down to the port. There was a dairy farm across the road, a domain and paddocks that swept down to the sea and what later became known as "Back Beach", a favourite with surfies. In those days, the IWD plant, built in 1960, was virtually beyond the city limits, though houses were built just down the road. (Curiously, there has been little said about the former chemical plant right in town that it replaced.)

The neighbourhood changed dramatically in the 1970s, starting with the construction of the New Plymouth power station on the port side of Paritutu Rock. This towering natural landmark suddenly had to share the skyline with a 200m-high chimney. A huge construction workforce was accommodated in new Electricity Department houses. High-tension pylons ploughed through or past their backyards and the itinerant tenants were in no position to object. Once operating, the power station made fearsome gushing noises that could be heard around the entire suburb in the wee hours.

Then came the National government's Think Big projects. A coastal road went in for the benefit of the burgeoning petrochemical industry, plus a massive, unsightly tank farm to store concentrate from the Maui gasfield. More petrochemical tanks went up on both sides of the hill opposite the IWD plant. Not surprisingly, Paritutu Rd got its own dedicated fire station. Voicing objection was largely pointless under the full-steam-ahead powers of the National Development Act devised by Rob Muldoon and his Think Big mastermind, Bill Birch.

Marie McNicholas, N Z Listener
http://www.listener....intable,2666.sm
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#56 User is offline   flowers 

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Posted 11 January 2005 - 04:33 PM

" Not BEACHLANDS, Winston. Nice try, but no banana.

Try BACK BEACH.

89 Paritutu Road, Back Beach, New Plymouth, to be specific - the location of the Dow chemical plant.

Mind you, easy to get them confused after a few whiskies. "


AND THE DUMP THAT WAS THERE THAT POISIENS ALL SURROUNDING TO THIS DAY.
And I think it was called Beachlands by the old newplymouthians.
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#57 User is offline   Easyrider 

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Posted 11 January 2005 - 06:56 PM

enlighten us to the function of United Chemicals Ltd which I understand the media are now having a very close look at.I am led to believe the shareholders list of that exporting branch of chemicals contains some interesting names Follow this lead and see where it leads.
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#58 User is offline   Easyrider 

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Posted 11 January 2005 - 07:12 PM

http://premierstrate...submit2003.html A good read if you have the time.
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#59 User is offline   flowers 

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Posted 12 January 2005 - 07:05 AM

Interesting.
I wonder who were the members?
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#60 User is offline   Ivan 

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Posted 12 January 2005 - 11:28 AM

05-14-2001 - from New Plymouth, New Zealand

I just returned from beach walk and in front of Dow research farm at base of cliff are 6 plastic containers -20 ltr- 1 marked Dow Elanco 2 4 D

I would advise giving any NZ seafood a miss for about 20 years now.
We photographed the area and containers, all toxic chemicals and mostly from Dow, I am at a loss as to what to do cause the police will just lose them. the production date on the 2 4 D is 2/92.. years past agreed halt to production. - Don Sartan

Yes anyone can and does go to this beach. this area on the beach is straight below Dows experiment farm, they have already had to move a 4000 cubic meter dump of toxics 1/4 mile back from same beach location. why it was buried again is????????? How these containers got there? Pitched off the top of cliff? mostly empty did not seem important,, I don't know. Vietnam Vet says its same smell as A/O tho.

He said some other things too, but we won't go there. Vietnam may take 100+ years to actually end.

Dow plugs away.
So do I

http://www.safe2use....-05-comment.htm


Container dated 1992, Showing 2 4 D and Dow Elancon insigina.

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