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About Vocational Independence (vi) Assessments The ACC's policy's on VIA, IMA, IOA, and

#1 User is offline   doppelganger 

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  Posted 19 January 2005 - 08:11 PM

About vocational independence (VI) assessment

Purpose of assessment
A vocational independence assessment is a tool for case managers to evaluate a claimant's vocational independence. That is, to:
  • Confirm that the vocational rehabilitation assistance that has been provided is comprehensive; that is, it fully addresses the identified needs, and injury-related barriers to employment or vocational independence.

  • Determine whether, as a result of that assistance, the claimant is able to work for 35 hours or more a week in the types of work identified in the initial occupational assessment.
The process is used once ACC has provided all the assistance that the claimant was assessed as needing, if the claimant has not yet obtained suitable work

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Note:
If a claimant's vocational rehabilitation is complete and the claimant is assessed as being vocationally independent, but they are not yet working, then Work and Income, rather than ACC, is the more appropriate agency from which the claimant should seek assistance with income.

What VI assessment is not
ACC is aware that assessment methods used in the past have been considered by claimants and other members of the public as a means for ACC to "get rid" of a claimant. (See Previous assessment methods used.)

A VI assessment cannot be used in this way. The VI assessment is an integral part of vocational rehabilitation and is a tool to use to review the vocational rehabilitation programme(s) and assess a claimant's vocational independence.

Under legislation, ACC can only provide assistance for a claimant's injury-related needs. However, it must also consider non-injury related needs, and the effect this has on a claimant's ability to be vocationally independent.


When to use this process
ACC can only refer a claimant for a vocational independence assessment in very specific circumstances, at the end of the programme of vocational rehabilitation assistance. These criteria are provided in the procedure for determining eligibility, if the claimant is receiving weekly compensation, and has not returned to suitable work.

Previous assessment methods used
Before 1 January 2002, there were two previous assessment methods, used in similar situations. This table shows the differences between the assessment method, following the completion of their vocational rehabilitation assistance.

http://nz.msnusers.c...s%2FVIA%235.JPG
Format of the assessment
There are two parts to a vocational independence assessment:
  • Occupational.

  • Medical.
Unlike other types of assessments, details of these assessments do not have to be documented and agreed in the IRP. ACC can require a claimant to undergo an assessment, so agreement is not required.

However, it would be more beneficial for ACC's relationship with the claimant during the Vocational Independence Assessment Process if the claimant's agreement was obtained.

Note:
If the assessment reveals that the claimant needs further vocational or medical rehabilitation assistance, when recording the further assessments or other interventions in the IRP, record the purpose of the action as being to meet the needs identified in the vocational independence assessment. This is the only situation in which any mention of the vocational independence assessment is recorded in the IRP.

Occupational assessment
The vocational independence occupational assessment involves reviewing the vocational rehabilitation assistance that was carried out under the claimant's IRP. The assessor reviews both the claimant's pre-injury skills (for instance, education, training and experience), and new skills gained in the course of their vocational rehabilitation.

Then the assessor determines whether:
  • These new skills are reflected in the "major industry group", and are closely aligned to the types of work (or "unit groups") specified on the IRP (as identified in the initial occupational assessment).

  • The claimant has gained a new set of skills associated with the major industry groups specified on the IRP, but relating to new types of work that the claimant could now undertake because of their newly acquired skills.
The assessment and report take a similar format to the initial occupational assessment. Also, if the assessor considers that:
  • The claimant is unable to undertake any of the types of work identified on the IRP, the assessment report contains recommendations for further vocational assistance for ACC to consider.

  • There are gaps where the vocational rehabilitation assistance has not been completed, the report identifies these and makes recommendations to ACC.
Medical assessment
The vocational independence medical assessment concentrates on the claimant's physical ability to safely work in the identified types of work over a durable period. The medical assessment takes a form similar to the initial medical assessment (IMA). The assessor examines the claimant's physical ability to undertake the specific work tasks identified in the occupational assessment.

If the claimant is not capable of carrying out the work tasks as above, then the assessment also considers and recommends what further medical rehabilitation is needed (that is, treatment), to assist the claimant in achieving that functional ability.

Transitional claims and vocational independence
There is only one situation where transition issues have effect on a vocational independence assessment.

If the claimant's vocational rehabilitation began before 15 January 2001, then the medical assessment
examines the claimant's ability to work for 30 hours or more per week (rather than 35 hours). Otherwise, the vocational independence provisions of the IPRC Act relate to all rehabilitation that is evaluated as complete after 1 April 2002.
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#2 User is offline   doppelganger 

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Posted 19 January 2005 - 08:15 PM

1. Determine eligibility for vocational independence assessment

Introduction
Before a claimant can be referred for a vocational independence assessment, their eligibility for the process must be determined.


Checklist before determining eligibility
A claimant can only be considered for a vocational independence assessment in very specific situations. Check that these activities have taken place before determining whether the claimant is eligible:
  • The claimant's vocational path identified in the IRP is either "obtain employment" or regain or acquire vocational independence". (See About vocational rehabilitation for more information on these vocational paths.)

  • An initial occupational assessment (IOA) and initial medical assessment (IMA) were both carried out at the beginning of the rehabilitation process. (See IQA and IMA for more information.)

  • The results of the IQA and IMA were documented in the IRP. (See IRP for more information on recording the assessment results.)

  • The vocational rehabilitation assistance that was provided focused on at least one of the types of work that the IOA and IMA identified as suitable for the claimant.
Eligibility criteria
A claimant is only eligible to undergo a vocational independence assessment if all the following criteria apply:

Note:
Only consider referring a claimant for assessment if 100% a confident that these criteria are met.

Occupational
  • An initial occupational assessment (IQA) and initial medical assessment (IMA) were carried out at the start of the vocational rehabilitation process.

  • The IOA identified types of work suitable for the claimant.

  • The IMA determined whether the claimant could medically sustain those types of work.

  • The programme of vocational rehabilitation assistance focused on at least one of the types of work that the IOA and IMA identified as suitable for the claimant.

  • The IRP includes the IOA and IMA, and the specific interventions to help the claimant obtain work, or become able to work in an alternative type of work.

  • The vocational rehabilitation parts of the IRP have been updated, and the claimant has signed it in agreement.

  • Any vocational rehabilitation assistance for which ACC was liable was completed within the last 12 months.
Medical
  • There is no injury-related medical treatment outstanding that would prevent the claimant from returning to work for 35 hours or more per week, such as planned surgery or unaddressed pain (This applies to treatment for any claim for issues. which the claimant has cover.)

Note The claimant must attend their appointment (see If claimant does not attend appointment).
About the Branch Review Team
Who makes up the Review team
The Branch Review Team is made up of:
  • The branch medical advisor (BMA).

  • A team manager.
What the team does
The team's task in relation to the vocational independence assessment is accountability for ensuring that claimants who enter the vocational independence assessment process meet the criteria stated in Section B of form ACC1Y11. Final accountability for these decisions rests with the team manager.

The following tasks are involved in arriving at a decision for each claim:
  • The team reviews the claim file, specifically for completion of vocational rehabilitation assistance and quality of the assistance.

  • The case manager and team discuss the case to determine whether the claimant fits the criteria for a standard assessment or a complex assessment. (ACC pays a medical assessor an additional fee for a complex vocational independence assessment)

    Standard Assessment means a claimant:
    • Who has 2 or less musculoskeletal injuries; or
    • Has a single non-musculoskeletal covered injury; or
    • Has no covered claims for mental/behaviour disorders; or
    • Whose claim is not categorised as a "sensitive claim" by ACC.
    complex Assessment means a claimant:
    • Who has 3 or more years on weekly compensation; or
    • has 3 or more musculoskeletal covered injuries; or
    • has more than 1 non-musculoskeletal multiple covered injury; or
    • has a significant mental/behaviour disorder; or
    • A covered "sensitive claim".

  • Team Manager completes Section B of the ACC191.

  • The BMA:
    • Completes Section B of the ACC191
    • Gives final sign-off on Section C of the ACC191.
    • Assists the case manager with the ongoing decision-making on the claim.
Procedure: Determine eligibility for vocational independence assessment

Use this procedure to determine whether a claimant is eligible to be referred for a vocational independence assessment.
  • Check for a current consent form ACC1672 from the claimant.

  • Print form ACC1913 and complete the appropriate sections:
    • Section A (File Summary).
    • Section B (Case Manager Check List).
    Note:
    All criteria must be met before a claimant can be referred for the assessment.

  • If the recommendation is to not refer the claimant for an assessment, continue case management until rehabilitation is completed, and:
    • Make sure that any additional rehabilitation has specific outcomes and time frames documented in the IRP.
    • Set a fresh evaluation date to consider an assessment again.

  • If the recommendation is to refer the claimant for an assessment, forward the claim file with the ACC191 to the Branch Review Team. Tag the following details:
    • The IRP.
    • The most recent medical certificate.
    • All previous occupational or vocational assessments.
    • Recent medical reports.
    • Case notes showing the progress of rehabilitation.
    • A copy of the claimant's curriculum vitae (if available).

  • If the claimant does not meet the team's criteria:
    • Ask for details of the recommended case management needed.
    • Set a fresh evaluation date to consider an assessment again.

  • If the claimant does meet the team's criteria, and the ACCJ91 is fully signed off and dated, contact the claimant to arrange an interview.

    Important:
    All team members must sign the ACC191 before the claimant can be contacted to make the referral for assessment.
  • Vocational independence assessment: File summary, team review and quality check

  • Claimant consent for the collection and release of information

  • Vocational independence assessment: File summary, team review and quality check

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#3 User is offline   doppelganger 

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Posted 19 January 2005 - 08:42 PM

2. Arrange vocational independence assessment


Introduction

Once the review team has signed off on the ACC191(1) form to confirm that the claimant is eligible for a vocational independence assessment, the next step is to interview the claimant, then arrange the assessment itself.



Note:
The occupational or medical assessor who does the vocational independence assessment must be different from the assessor who did the initial assessment. This is to ensure that the assessor has a 'new' outlook of the claimant's vocational independence.



Providing a choice of assessor - check assessor availability

The vocational independence assessment must be carried out in a timely manner, once the decision is made that the claimant is eligible. Therefore, before providing the claimant with a choice of assessors, check that they are able to interview the claimant without unreasonable delay, ie, within 10 work days. (For more information, see Claimant choice of assessors.)



Interviewing the claimant

Arrange a face-to-face interview with the claimant. This interview:
  • Is the case manager's opportunity to explain the vocational independence assessment process to the claimant, so that they fully understand the process and the possible outcomes.

  • Gives the claimant an opportunity to ask questions and discuss any concerns they may have about the assessment process.

  • Gives ACC the opportunity to let the claimant know what their rights and responsibilities are in the process.

Use the Interview checklist to make sure all the required points are covered.



Note:
If the claimant declines a face-to-face interview, write to the claimant and include in the letter all the information that would be covered in the interview. Clearly document their refusal in Pathway.



Interview checklist
In the interview, ensure the claimant has a copy of the vocational independence assessment fact sheet FSVIO1 and discuss the following.



Purpose of the assessment
The purpose of the assessment is to:
  • Make sure the claimant understands that the programme of vocational rehabilitation assistance is complete, and that assessing a claimant's vocational independence is the next stage of the continuum, following vocational assistance.

  • Outline the vocational independence assessment process. Specifically, state the nature, purpose and outcomes of the vocational independence assessment. That is, the assessment will consider the completeness of the vocational rehabilitation assistance provided, and it could state that they do or do not have vocational independence.

  • Explain to the claimant that, even if they are working while receiving weekly compensation, ACC can require them to undertake an assessment to determine their vocational independence.

How assessments are carried out
Explain that:
  • The claimant must participate in the assessment and the consequence of not doing so (that provision of their weekly compensation can be declined under sections 103 and 104 of the IPRIC Act 2001).

  • The claimant can bring a support person with them during any assessments.

  • If there are any special language, cultural or other needs, these will be taken into consideration.

  • The assessors examine the claimant's capacity to carry out the types of work identified as suitable in the initial occupational and initial medical assessments. Those might be different from their previous jobs.

  • The occupational assessor (OA) and medical assessor (MA), although contracted by ACC for their services, are independent of ACC.

  • ACC makes the final decision about continuing or ceasing weekly compensation, based on information ACC receives from the assessors.

Offer a choice of appropriately qualified assessors from the list of available assessors. If there is more than one assessor available, the claimant should advise their choice within 24 hours. (For more information, see Claimant choice of assessors.)

Clearly distinguish and explain the roles of the OA and MA (as described in What the OA does and What the MA does).

Describe that the OA reviews (adds any additional information not previously collected in the IOA):
  • Additional types of work that the claimant could be able to undertake, given their additional training.

  • All comments the claimant makes, especially about the types of work identified as still suitable.

  • Previous vocational rehabilitation, which includes:
    • The claimant's work experience, education, training and skills.
    • Types of work identified as suitable, and any requirements that could be needed to allow the claimant to function safely in that type of work.
    • All information supplied by ACC.
    • Consideration of the IRP, especially the vocational rehabilitation assistance provided by ACC.
    • The types of work identified in the IRP.
    • Completion of the vocational rehabilitation programmes in the IRP.
    • Additional skills, education and training the claimant might have gained from the vocational rehabilitation assistance.
Advise the claimant that, if they need to travel to attend the assessment, ACC can in some cases contribute to the transport and accommodation costs (as described in Ancillary services).



What happens after the assessment
Explain that, if the assessment finds they have achieved vocational independence, their weekly compensation will cease after three months from that decision date. However, ACC can assist the claimant further after that decision, by providing:
  • A job search programme (which ACC will fund).

  • Budgeting and counselling advice.

  • Ongoing case management.

  • Assistance to enrol with the Department of Work and Income.

  • A list of employment agencies.

Explain that, if the assessment finds they have not achieved vocational independence, their vocational rehabilitation assistance and weekly compensation will continue.



Also explain that if they need further treatment at any stage, the results of the vocational independence assessment do not prevent entitlement to such assistance. (The assessment only affects their entitlement to weekly compensation.)



Recording the claimant interview
Record the following details as the claimant interview progresses:
  • Give the claimant a copy of the following documents:
    • Form ACC191.(2) (All sections must be completed.)
    • Form ACC691.(3)
    • Fact sheet FSVIO1.(4)
    • Letter V102.(5 )(Either give this to the claimant at the initial interview or send it out after the interview with the ACC193.)
    • Form ACC193.(6)
    Ask them to complete the ACC193 questionnaire, and sign that the information on the ACC191 is correct. If the claimant wishes to take the information away, this is acceptable. The claimant must not feel any pressure to complete or sign any document until they have had time to read the information.

  • Be available to record the claimant's comments, if they prefer this. If the claimant does not wish to sign the ACCI91 or complete ACC193 (Claimant questionnaire), record this.

  • Inform the claimant that they can provide further written comments later, and that their comments will be forwarded to the assessor(s), as long as those are received before the assessments take place.

  • Record the claimant's choice of assessor. If the claimant does not choose assessors at the interview, ask them to advise you of their choice within 24 hours.

Arranging the assessments

Important:
If referring a claimant whose history suggests that they could pose a threat to assessors, provide appropriate advice to the assessors about observing their safety.



If claimant does not attend appointment
Sometimes the appointment between the claimant and the assessor cannot or does not happen as planned.


If the assessor cannot contact the claimant, or is unable to do an assessment, the assessor should let ACC know within five working days, so that another assessor can be arranged to see the claimant.

If a claimant cannot attend their appointment, they should give the assessor at least one day's notice so they can arrange another appointment time.

If the claimant does not attend their appointment, the assessor contacts the case manager, who asks for two further appointment times. It is then the case manager's responsibility to arrange the further appointment with the claimant, and let them know what their responsibilities are regarding attending the assessment.

The assessor(s) should provide ACC with a written record of any non-attendance.

Checklists of information to send assessors
Occupational assessment
Send the following information to the occupational assessor (OA):
  • Letter V103(7) as the covering letter.

  • A copy of the claimant's current individual rehabilitation plan.

  • Case notes showing the progress of the claimant's rehabilitation, particularly the initial occupational assessment (IOA) and initial medical assessment (IMA).

  • Copies of forms ACC191(8) and ACC691.(9)

  • Form ACC19Y (10)

  • A copy of the claimant's curriculum vitae.
Medical assessment
Send the following information to the medical assessor (MA):
  • Letter V104(11) as the covering letter.

  • A complete list of all the documents being sent.

  • Completed ACC191(12) form.

  • Completed ACC691(13) form,

  • Completed ACC192(14) form.

  • Completed ACC193(15) form (if claimant completed it).

  • Completed ACC194(16) form (see note later in this topic).

  • Completed ACC195(17) form from the occupational assessor (OA).

  • All completed ACC196(18) forms from the OA.

  • Form ACC197(19) with initial section completed by OA.

  • Completed ACC167(20) consent form.

  • A copy of the most up-to-date vocational individual rehabilitation plan (IRP).

  • Copies of all medical specialist and radiological reports received before the IRP was prepared even if medical reports do not relate to current injury.

  • Copies of all medical and specialist and radiological reports received during rehabilitation.

  • Copies of all relevant physiotherapy and pain management reports.

  • A copy of the original "advice of injury" form (to establish cover).

  • A copy of the latest ACCiS certificate of incapacity.
Note:
The GP is obliged to complete the ACC194. If the GP does not complete and return this within ten days of the request, and there has been no success in contacting them, then note in the covering letter that this questionnaire has not been completed, and proceed as normal.




What the assessors do
Timeframes for assessor tasks
When the assessor receives ACC's referral, they carry out the following activities:


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Note:
The timeframes the assessor must meet are detailed in their provider contract for their services. (All contracts require the same timeframes.) However, assessors can always request an extension if circumstances outside their control prevent them meeting the contracted timeframes.



Occupational assessor
The occupational assessor:
  • Reviews the programme of vocational rehabilitation assistance that ACC has provided to the claimant.

  • Reviews the claimant's skills, training, experience and so on that were determined in the initial occupational assessment (IOA).

  • Identifies whether the rehabilitation assistance provided is complete, and whether there are any gaps.

  • Which (if any) types of work that were identified in the IOA are suitable for the claimant.

  • Whether any other types of work might now be suitable for the claimant's current skills, training, and so on.

Considering additional types of work
They can also consider any additional types of work that:
  • Belong to the same major industry group as the types of work identified in the IOA.
  • Are closely aligned to the types of work in the IOA.
  • Are considered to now be suitable for the claimant because of the additional skills they have gained while receiving vocational rehabilitation assistance.
All types of work that the assessment considers need to be:
  • Available in New Zealand.

  • At a similar level to the claimant's previous level of employment.
The occupational assessor completes the report forms provided by ACC, including a separate ACC196(21) sheet for each type of work assessed.


Information covered

The assessor must take the following information into account in their assessment:
  • The claimant's previous vocational rehabilitation, work experience, education, training and skills as identified in the initial occupational assessment.

  • Any additional skills, education or training that the claimant has gained through the programme of rehabilitation assistance.

  • Both the types of work identified in the initial occupational assessment, and any additional types of work that the claimant has become suitable for during their rehabilitation (as described in Considering additional types of work).

  • All information that ACC has provided.

  • The current contents of the IRP (particularly, vocational rehabilitation information).

  • The type(s) of work identified in the IRP as the focus of the vocational rehabilitation.

  • Completion of the interventions comprising the programme of vocational rehabilitation assistance.
Note:
Much of this information can be sourced from the initial occupational assessment.



If rehabilitation is found to be incomplete

If the assessor believes that the vocational rehabilitation (as stated on the IRP) is not complete, they must:
  • Contact the case manager to discuss their concerns.

  • State this on form ACC195(22), and provide options and recommendations for further vocational rehabilitation assistance.
Medical assessor

What the assessment considers


The medical assessor examines the claimant's physical capability to perform the tasks involved in the types of work identified in the occupational assessment and listed on the ACC196 sheets. The assessor reports back to ACC on their findings.


The assessment focuses on carrying out the work tasks:
  • Safely.

  • During a working week of 35 hours or more.

  • 'Durably' or 'sustainably' (that is, over a long period of employment).

Information covered
The assessor must take the following information into account in their assessment.

The status of the claimant's injury, based on:
  • All information supplied by ACCf including medical reports and the initial medical assessment.

  • The current IRP, particularly notes on the claimant's medical status, and whether there is any outstanding medical treatment (including pain issues) that have not been addressed.

  • The assessor's clinical examination of the claimant.

  • The claimant's conditions (those covered by ACC, and those that are not).
The types of work identified in the occupational assessment, and whether the work tasks involved will be medically sustainable for the claimant to carry out.

Whether the claimant has achieved vocational independence, in terms of their physical capacity to carry out the types of work identified by the occupational assessor.

Any non-injury factors or conditions present, that could prevent (or are preventing) the claimant from achieving vocational independence.

The assessor must also note in the report all comments that the claimant makes about their injury and vocational independence, in relation to the identified types of work and the respective work tasks.

If the information is incomplete
If the medical assessor needs more information, or an additional assessment:[
  • They must contact the case manager to request the assessment or information or ask the relevant questions.

  • The case manager arranges any additional assessments, and provides the assessor with any assessment report, information or answers requested.

  • The medical assessor discusses further with the claimant, and uses the additional information to complete the report.
If the rehabilitation is found to be incomplete
If the medical assessor considers that the claimant is not physically capable of undertaking any of the identified types of work, then the assessor advises the claimant that they will recommend further rehabilitation assistance. The report contains:
  • Options for further assistance (in the form of treatment) for achieving that capability.

  • The assessor's recommendation(s) about the best option.
  • A rationale for the recommendation(s).
If the assessor makes any 'conditional' recommendations, then those conditions need to be consistent with the types of work described in the occupational assessment.

Assessment fees (medical)
All contracted assessors provide their services for the fees shown in this table.

http://nz.msnusers.c...s%2FVIA%237.JPG

Vocational Independence Medical Assessment Prices

http://nz.msnusers.c...s%2FVIA%238.JPG

Generic prices (Applicable to IMA & VIMA Services)

http://nz.msnusers.c...s%2FVIA%239.JPG

Procedure: Arrange assessment

Use this procedure once the review team has completed and signed off the ACC191(23) form.
  • Make a list of assessors that the claimant can choose from by identifying which assessors are available to undertake the assessments within two weeks of referral.



  • Arrange and carry out an interview with the claimant, ensuring all the points on the interview checklist are covered.


  • At the interview give the claimant a copy of the {u}relevant documents[/u]



  • Send letter V102(24) to the claimant, confirming that the vocational independence assessment process will begin, and the chosen occupational assessor and medical assessor will contact them to arrange an appointment for an assessment. (Alternatively, give this letter to the claimant at the interview.)


  • Send form ACC193(25) to the claimant to complete and return. (The claimant is encouraged to complete this.)

  • Send letter V101(26) with an ACC194(27) form to the claimant's GP.

    If the GP does not return this form to ACC within ten days, ring the GP and state the value of this information for the claimant. Ask the GP to complete it within five days. If the information is still not received, proceed as normal and record that the GP questionnaire was not returned.


  • Send letter V103(26) to the occupational assessor (OA).

    The OA should arrange the assessment with the claimant, but this can depend on branch practice.

    Once the OA's report is received, send letter V10429 to the medical assessor (MA) with the required information listed.
    The MA should arrange the assessment appointment with the claimant, but this can depend on branch practice. The MA sends the completed report to the claimant and to the case manager.

  • Complete the Procedure for actioning the assessors' recommendations.
___________________________________________________________________________
  • Vocational independence assessment: File summary, team review and quality check
  • Vocational independence assessment: File summary, team review and quality check form

  • Vocational independence assessment: Claimant quality check

  • Vocational independence assessment

  • Claimant notification of occupational assessment

  • Vocational independence assessment: Claimant questionnaire

  • Referral for occupational assessor

  • Vocational independence assessment: File summary, team review and quality check form

  • Vocational independence: Claimant quality check

  • Vocational independence assessment: Recommendation

  • Vocational independence referral for medical assessor

  • Vocational independence assessment: File summary, team review and quality check form

  • Vocational independence assessment: Claimant quality check

  • List of referral documents for the vocational independence medical assessor

  • Vocational independence assessment: Claimant questionnaire

  • Vocational independence assessment: General practitioner questionnaire

  • Vocational independence occupational assessment form

  • Vocational independence assessment: job details sheet

  • Vocational independence assessment: Recommendation

  • Claimant consent for collection and release of information

  • Vocational independence assessment: job details sheet

  • Vocational independence occupational assessment form

  • Vocational independence assessment: File summary, team review and quality check

  • Claimant notification of occupational assessment

  • Vocational independence assessment: Claimant questionnaire

  • Vocational independence assessment : General practitioner questionnaire

  • Vocational independence assessment: General practitioner questionnaire

  • Referral for occupational assessor

  • Referral for medical assessor

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#4 User is offline   doppelganger 

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Posted 19 January 2005 - 09:18 PM

3 Action vocational independence assessment recommendations


Deciding on the result

Once the vocational independence assessments are complete, the case manager and the review team (team manager and branch medical adviser (BMA)) discuss the information provided by the assessors.

The team needs to agree on:
  • Whether the claimant has vocational independence and a capacity to work for 35 hours or more per week in any of the identified types of work.

  • What action ACC will take on that basis.
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Completing the quality check


The ACC19S(2) form gives the process for a comprehensive quality check:
  • Team manager completes the team manager checklist. (All boxes must be ticked.)

  • BMA completes the Branch Medical Advisor checklist. (All boxes must be ticked.)

  • Both team manager and BMA complete the "Review Team" decision section, and sign that either:
    • They both agree the claimant has achieved vocational independence.
    • There are further medical or vocational issues that need to be addressed.
Note:
It is crucial to consider each part and address any inconsistencies or information gaps before making a final decision.


Action if further rehabilitation recommended


If the occupational or medical assessor recommend that rehabilitation [email protected] should continue, the following stages need to take place:
  • Obtain specific information from the assessor.

  • With the claimant, update the IRP.

  • Complete any further agreed interventions.

  • If required, begin the vocational independence assessment process (ie, repeat the vocational independence occupational and medical assessments).

Ceasing entitlement

If the claimant has regained or acquired vocational independence, they lose their entitlement to weekly compensation three months from the date on which they were notified in writing of the decision.

During this period, the case manager:
  • Maintains regular contact with the claimant (at least once every four weeks).

  • 0ffers the claimant a copy of fact sheet FSVIO23 about employment agencies, together with the corresponding list of employment agencies in their area (on the relevant version of fact sheet FSVIO2a). A full list of agencies is available in Forms, letters, fact sheets by category.

  • Offers the claimant the following assistance:

  • Transitional Job Search assistance. This is a contracted programme for people with vocational independence who have not yet found employment. Note that this programme is neither:
    • Vocational rehabilitation.
    • A component of the IRP.

  • Budgeting and counselling assistance. This can be up to a maximum of two sessions for each of:
    • Budgetary advice through a budgetary advisory agency (such as the Citizens Advice Agency).
    • Counselling. (Use ACC-repistered counsellors.) Enrolment with Work and Income.


      Note:
      This assistance must not extend beyond the final weekly compensation cessation date.
Review of vocational independence assessment

ACC's primary focus must be ensuring that, if a claimant seeks a review, ACC has applied the vocational independence assessment process fairly and reasonably. This can be achieved through:
  • Sound case management practice, and open and honest communication with claimants.

  • Completion of a programme of vocational rehabilitation assistance.

  • Adhering strictly to all the steps of the vocational independence assessment process.

  • Noting and addressing any concerns raised by the claimant (or their support person) at the time they are raised.

  • Following up on any inconsistencies or information gaps provided by assessors before making a decision to cease weekly compensation.
If a claimant goes to review, follow the administrative review process:
  • Participate in the review hearing.

  • Apply for legal assistance from ACC Legal Services only if the review is potentially difficult and high risk.

    Note:
    Assistance will be granted in exceptional circumstances, if the issues are contentious, or the claimant and their advocate are particularly challenging.


Transitional job search

About the Transitional Job Search service
The Transitional Job Search service is designed to place the claimant in paid, permanent and continuous employment that meets the required hours or days to be worked.

The purpose of purchasing this service is to:
  • Provide additional assistance to claimants who are looking for work after a decision is made that they have achieved vocational independence.

  • Improve ACC's commitment to supporting claimants following the vocational independence assessment process.

  • Improve the outcome of a decision of vocational independence by providing additional job search assistance.

  • Provide the claimant with an opportunity to find work through a process not associated with vocational rehabilitation but as an additional support service.

  • Support the claimant with CV updates and pre-employment preparation (optional extra).

  • Provide the case manager with access to high quality, standardised, transitional job search services that are cost-effective, provided in a safe environment, and delivered in a timely manner.

  • Provide case managers with a service to offer claimants who are not in employment and have been issued with a decision that their entitlement to ongoing weekly compensation will cease within a defined period.

  • To match claimant capabilities to suitable identified employment opportunities. (This means the jobs that were identified in the vocational independence medical assessment.)

  • To improve the ability of the claimant to seek and secure suitable employment (that is, in the types of work identified in the vocational independence medical assessment).

Core components of the service
  • Plan of action.

  • CV preparation or modification if current CV does not meet the requirements of the jobs identified by the vocational independence medical assessor.

  • Clarification of the options for types of work, and agreed vocational directions.

  • Job search services. (Including information on job search strategies, close monitoring in job seeking of no less than one hour every 2 weeks, and achievement of a job placement.)

Optional components of the service

Preparation for job seeking, including:
  • Mandatory components:
    • Labour market information.
    • Interview skills.
    • Job search strategies.
    • Guidance on personal presentation.

  • Discretionary components:
    • Guidance on self-motivation1 stress management and time management.
    • Advice on punctuality and employer expectations.

Fees payable

See the relevant Contract provider lists for fees payable for these services.

The chargeable services are:
  • Plan of action.

  • CV preparation or modification.

  • Preparation for job search.

  • Job search services. (This service component is paid on an hourly basis up to a maximum of 12 hours and is invoiced monthly with the progress report.)

Process: Transitional Job Search

Follow these steps when a claimant accepts the case manager's offer to be referred for transitional job search, after the decision has been made that they have vocational independence.
  • Case manager refers the claimant, using form ACC215(4), to a contracted agency, including the following information:
    • The optional service components required.
    • A list of the claimant's options for types of work.
    • Specific relevant information relating to the claimant's injury and any restrictions.
    • Specific relevant information relating to the claimant's employment history.
    • Previous relevant rehabilitation interventions including copies of relevant reports and assessments.
    • Any known barriers to the claimant's return to work.
    • The service period (which can be for up to 10 weeks but must not extend beyond the claimant's weekly compensation cessation date).

  • Case manager sends letter VR02(5) to the claimant notifying them of the following details:
    • The programme's objectives.
    • The provider's name and address.
    • The proposed starting date.
    • That the provider will be in contact with them to make the necessary arrangements.

  • On receiving the referral, the provider takes the following action:
    • Within three days of receiving the referral, notifies the case manager of any inability to contact the claimant.
    • Within two working days, notifies the case manager of acceptance of the referral.
    • Within seven working days of accepting the referral, commences the service.

  • The provider will send brief monthly progress reports to the case manager.


  • On completion of the service the provider sends a final completion report, a copy of the claimants updated CV, and an invoice to the case manager. The completion report must contain the following information:
    • Whether a return to work outcome has been achieved and, if so, employer details.
    • Services completed.
    • Goals achieved.
    • Obstacles encountered. Other relevant information.

Optional referral to Work and Income for transitional job search

For a trial period ACC claimants have the option of accessing Work and Income job-seeking services (not income benefits). Claimants can access this service during their transitional job search period, after they have been assessed as vocationally independent.

ACC will continue to pay the claimant's weekly compensation throughout the 3-month transitional job search period as usual. Work and Income will only provide job-seeking services at this stage.
The benefits of accessing Work and Income job-seeking services are:
  • Work and Income have contact with a large pool of potential employers.

  • Work and Income have dedicated work brokers who source potential jobs, and case managers to match clients with job vacancies.

  • Employers offering work to ACC claimants may be eligible for some employment subsidies provided through Work and Income.

  • Seamless transition to Work and Income to maintain job search progress, and obtain income support (for those who are eligible) if employment is not found at the end of the 3-month transitional job search.


Process: Offering a claimant Work and Income job-seeking services
  • At the start of the 3-month transitional job search period, the ACC case manager meets with the claimant to discuss a voluntary referral to Work and Income for job-seeking services.

  • The case manager contacts the local Work and Income branch and arranges for the claimant to attend a 'Work for You" (WK4U) seminar.

    Note:
    The WK4U seminars are conducted in a group setting. The purpose of the seminars is to tell participants what is expected of them, what Work and Income can do for them, and what income and employment assistance is available.


  • If, after the WK4U seminar, the claimant agrees to be referred to Work and Income, the ACC case manager, in conjunction with the claimant, completes the ACCI143 Referral to Work and Income transfer form.

    Note:
    The weekly compensation details on the ACC1143 form do not need to be completed as the referral is only for the job-seeking services at this point.


  • The ACC case manager arranges a joint interview between the claimant and Income case manager, by phoning 0800 559-009. The ACC case attends this meeting if the claimant wants them to.


  • The ACC case manager must continue to maintain regular contact with the claimant (at least every 2 weeks) to check on progress with finding employment.



  • If no employment has been found by the end of the 3-month transitional job search period, then the claimant can meet with the Work and Income case manager to apply for income support and the ACC weekly compensation will cease. For more information on referring a claimant to Work and Income, see 4. Referral of exiting vocationally independent claimants to Work and Income (W&I).


  • Four weeks after the claimant has exited ACC, the ACC case manager must call the claimant to check on their progress with finding employment, and to bring the relationship between ACC and the claimant to a close.


  • During the telephone call in step 7, above, the case manager records the claimant's current work status in Pathway's Activity Log as one of the following:
    • Now in employment.
    • Continuing job search while receiving (type of) benefit.
    • No longer seeking employment, receiving (type of) benefit.

This is a voluntary option for the claimant. The claimant may choose to see an ACC contracted vocational rehabilitation provider for the transitional job search if they preferr.


Weekly compensation payments during job search period


Entitlement to weekly compensation payments continues as usual throughout the vocational independence assessment process, up to the end of the three-month period. The case manager is responsible for the following tasks:
  • Continuing payments until that date.

  • If the claimant applies to Work and Income, provide the claimant with their weekly compensation entitlement details for Work and Income's use.

  • Abating the claimant's payments as appropriate during the remainder of the period if both of the following apply:
    • They continue to work, or get work during the period.
    • Their earnings are less than the weekly compensation payments

    Note:
    The claimant does not need to provide any medical certificates during this period.
Special cases


Deterioration following determination of vocational independence


Following ACC's decision that a claimant has achieved vocational independence, the claimant's injury status could deteriorate.


Two common examples of deterioration following the vocational independence assessment decision, include:
  • Recurrence or deterioration of the injuries for which the claimant has cover.
  • Requests for further treatment (such as surgery).
Recurrences and deterioration

If the claimant produces a medical certificate indicating a recurrence or deterioration, contact the GP and ask whether in their opinion, the recurrence or deterioration affects the claimant's capacity to perform the types of work identified in the vocational independence assessment.

If the GP states that this is the case, arrange for the claimant to undergo a further vocational independence occupational and medical assessment to verify this.

It is recommended that the GP is asked for a written report that specifies the following:
  • Is this episode of incapacity directly related to an existing injury for which the claimant has cover, or is it a new injury?

  • What has caused the recurrence or deterioration?

  • When did it happen? (the actual date)

  • How did the recurrence or deterioration occur? What aggravated the existing injury?

  • How long is the period of incapacity expected to last? (date to be included)

  • What rehabilitation is being instigated or undertaken by the GP?
Do not reinstate weekly compensation until it has been determined that a claimant no longer has vocational independence. Under no circumstances can weekly compensation be reinstated until a further occupational and medical assessment determines the claimant has lost their vocational independence.


If a claimant requires a vocational independence medical assessment, if they reach the threshold of 35 hours per week based on that assessment, they can be considered to still have vocational independence.

If it is determined that they have lost that independence, backdate their reinstated weekly compensation from the date on the medical certificate.


Earners6 requiring surgery after VI decision

This topic describes how weekly compensation is managed, if the claimant returned to work after a decision was made following their vocational independence assessment, but requires surgery that may affect their capacity to work.

Rate of weekly compensation

A claimant might need time off work due to injury-related surgery, related to the claim for which the vocational independence decision was made.


In this case, calculate the claimant's weekly compensation entitlement based on their earnings immediately prior to the date of surgery.


Duration of weekly compensation entitlement


The weekly compensation entitlement is limited to the period until the expected date of recovery from surgery, as specified by the Medical Disability Advisor (MDA) guidelines.



Where there are no MDA guidelines for the particular surgery, weekly compensation is limited to the expected recovery date specified by the surgeon. (Obtain this date prior to surgery taking place.)


Note:
The Elective Surgery Unit (ESU) advises the claimant to contact their case manager, who advises them as to whether they have an entitlement to weekly compensation.

Entitlement ends on return to work date

No weekly compensation entitlement is payable after the predetermined recovery date.

Advise the claimant that they will be expected to return to work following the expected recovery date.

Claimant's vocational independence deteriorates
If the claimant advises that their ability to work has deteriorated after the expected recovery date, weekly compensation does not continue under this policy.

If the claimant still has the potential to regain their vocational independence, refer them for a vocational independence assessment to determine if they are eligible for weekly compensation on the basis of deterioration (as described in Special cases). That is, the claimant needs to go through the entire process again.

Note The claimant must attend their appointment (see if claimant does not attend appointment).

Major complications following surgery

If there is a major complication following surgery, the claimant or their representative needs to notify the case manager.

The case manager and the Branch Medical Advisor (BMA) will discuss the ongoing incapacity with the surgeon to establish a new date for ceasing weekly compensation payments.

If, by this new date, the claimant has still not returned to work, they will be required to undergo a vocational independence assessment.

Note:
This policy relates only to claimants who have returned to work following the vocational independence assessment process.

Claimant does not recover vocational independence

If the claimant does not recover within the expected surgery recovery time, they could need a vocational independence assessment.

If the assessment shows the claimant does not have vocational independence, all of the following apply:
  • They are entitled to weekly compensation payments if they are an earner and otherwise eligible.

  • They can proceed through the vocational independence assessment process again, following the completion of any agreed further vocational rehabilitation.

Note:
If the claimant requires surgery before the completion of a vocational independence assessment, this could mean treatment needs have not been fully met and the assessment might need to be deferred. In this case, seek advice from the BMA.

Weekly compensation entitlement for further incapacity

If the claimant's condition deteriorates and they need treatment other than surgery, complete a further vocational independence assessment.

If this shows the claimant has lost their vocational independence due to the injury, they are entitled to weekly compensation as follows. The claimant receives the greater of the following:
[
  • The rate of weekly compensation they were last entitled to (updated for indexation if applicable).

  • The recalculated rate based on their actual recent earnings.

This means that even if the claimant becomes entitled to weekly compensation again, but no longer has a job, they can still retain their previous entitlement.


Procedures

Procedure: Review assessment reports

Follow these steps when the vocational independence occupational assessment report arrives:
  • Review the documents for accuracy and completeness. If anything is unclear request further clarification from the occupational assessor before proceeding with the medical assessment.

    The occupational assessor can review the vocational rehabilitation assistance that ACC has provided, and in their report discuss or note any gaps. Determine whether any noted gaps preclude the claimant going on to a medical assessment, or whether further explanation is required to the occupational assessor.

    Note:
    On completing the assessment, the occupational assessor sends to the case manager:
    • Three copies each of assessment forms ACC195(7) and ACC19G(8).
    • One copy of form ACC19V(9).

  • Case manager forwards one copy of each of the forms (except the ACC197) to the vocational independence medical assessor.



  • When the medical assessment arrives, discuss the reports with the review team:

    • The case manager sends a copy of their assessment reports to the claimant once both assessments are complete.
    • If there are inconsistencies in the medical assessor's report (such as lack of clarity, typographical errors, and so on) ask the medical assessor to correct these and to send an updated copy to the claimant.

  • The team manager and the branch medical advisor (BMA) must complete the ACC19810 (as described in Completing the quality check) before the case manager notifies the claimant.

    Note:
    All sections must be completed.


  • Once the team reaches a decision, arrange an interview with the claimant to discuss the results of the assessments.
Note:
Encourage the claimant to come into the office and discuss the outcomes from the vocational independence assessment. If the claimant does not wish to come in for an interview, this can take place over the phone (and record that the claimant has chosen this option).


Procedure: Interview claimant and action recommendations
  • In the interview, advise the claimant of, and ensure they fully understand, all the following points:
    • They have received copies of the occupational and medical assessments.
    • The outcome of the assessments.
    • The recommendations the assessors made.
    • The review team's decision.
    • How these decisions affect the claimant.
    • Ongoing access to assistance prior to ceasing entitlement.
    • Their ongoing access to medical treatment is available if required.
    • The review process, and their right to review.

  • If the team's decision is to continue providing vocational rehabilitation assistance, then:
    • Discuss with the claimant what further vocational rehabilitation assistance will be provided.
    • Obtain their agreement and signature on the extended IRP to further assessments needed, and so on.

  • If the team's decision is that the claimant has achieved vocational independence, explain to the claimant at the interview that:
    • Their entitlement to vocational rehabilitation ceases.
    • Any entitlement they have to weekly compensation will cease three months from the date the decision is advised in writing.
    • ACC will provide ongoing support during this period (as described Ceasing entitlement), assisting the claimant by providing:
      • Job search assistance (Transitional Job Search service).
      • Budgeting and counselling advice.
      • Regular (monthly) contact with a case manager.
      • Assistance to enrol with Work and Income.
      • A list of employment agencies.

  • Note:
    Weekly compensation can be ceased even if the person is unable to work because of a non-injury medical condition. After the interview, confirm in writing what was discussed, using the appropriate letter:
    • Letter V106(11), if the claimant has achieved vocational independence, and was receiving weekly compensation.
    • Letter V107(12), if the claimant has not achieved vocational independence, and the rehabilitation assistance is to continue.

  • If sending letter V106 to the claimant, also:
    • Photocopy the V106. Sign on this copy that the leaflet was enclosed, and retain this copy on the claimant's file.
    • Include a copy of the leaflet "Is There a Problem" with the V106.
    • Send letter V108(13) to the claimant's GP. Be sure to attach the medical assessor's report to this letter.


  • If the claimant hasn't found a job 8-weeks into the transitional job search period, refer the claimant to Work and Income.

    For more information, see [u]4. Referral of exiting ACC vocationally independent claimants to Work and Income (W&I).


  • If the claimant has achieved vocational independence, and their weekly compensation is to cease:
    • Continue weekly compensation payments in IIS until the end of the three-month period.
    • If the claimant gets a job during this period, abate their weekly compensation payments as normal.
_______________________________________________________________
  • For assessments prior to 15 January 2001, this was 30 hours per week.

  • Work rehabilitation assessment: Final quality check and decision

  • About employment agencies

  • Referral for Transitional Job Search services

  • Claimant advice of job search appointment

  • This does not apply for claimants who need surgery and are non-earners.

  • Occupational assessment form

  • Work rehabilitation assessment: Job details sheet

  • Work rehabilitation assessment: Recommendation

  • Work rehabilitation assessment: Final quality check and decision

  • Claimant notification of compensation cessation

  • Claimant notification of further rehabilitation needed

  • General practitioner notification of compensation cessation

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#5 User is offline   doppelganger 

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Posted 19 January 2005 - 09:19 PM

4.Referral of exiting vocationally independent claimants to Work and Income

Introduction
A formal referral process exists between ACC and Work and income (W&I), to assist claimants assessed as vocationally independent, into sustainable employment. The process aims to assist these claimants to access job seeking services and/or income support.


This referral only applies to ctaimants who:
  • Are assessed as vocationally independent, and

  • Have either:
    • not found work during the first eight-weeks of the transitional job search period, or
    • are receiving abatement but continuing to seek full-time employment, and Consent to participating

  • in this process.

About this document
This document describes the process when an exiting vocationally independent claimant agrees to ACC assistance when transferring to Work and Income.

Note:
This process does not change the current vocational independence assessment process. For more information, see 3 Action vocational independence assessment recommendations.

Overview diagram: Refer claimant to Work and Income
The following diagram describes the process for referring exiting claimants to Work and income (W&I).



Posted Image

Process: Referring a claimant to Work and Income
The following steps are performed when a claimant is referred to W&I.
  • A claimant assessed as vocationally independent, enters the 12-week transitional job search period.

  • Four weeks prior to the end of the transitional job search period, the case manager meets with the claimant to discuss a referral to Work and Income.

  • If the claimant consents to the referral, the case manager and claimant complete the referral form (ACC1143)(1).

  • The claimant arranges a handover meeting with a W&I case manager, and their ACC case manager.

  • At the handover meeting, the ACC case manager introduces the claimant to the w&I case manager.

  • The ACC case manager contacts the claimant four weeks after they have left ACC.

Meeting with the claimant to discuss referral to Work and Income

Four weeks before the claimant's 12-week transitional job search allowance ceases, the ACC case manager meets with the claimant to discuss a referral to Work and Income (W&I).

At this meeting, the case manager discusses the following with the claimant:
  • A referral to W&I for job seeking and/or income support.
  • The claimant's cv.

    Note:
    The claimant must have a CV before meeting the w&I case manager. If a CV has not been developed, the case manager must arrange for a rehabilitation provider to develop one with the claimant as soon as possible. For more information, see CV preparation.

  • The referral to W&I form (ACCI.143(2)).

  • The voluntary use of the referral form.

  • The benefits to the claimant in disclosing vocational rehabilitation information to W&I.
The ACC case manager gives the claimant the Work and Income booklet 'How can we help you?', as this booklet will be discussed by the W&I case manaqer at the
claimant's first interview.



These booklets can be ordered directly from Wickliffe, and are known as ACC1146. For more information on ordering stationery, see Wickliffe.

Note:
The claimant should not be given any expectation that they will gain employment through W&I, or of the income support entitlements they could receive.


Completing the referral form - ACC1143

At the meeting between the ACC case manager and claimant. the referral form is discussed and completed, and the appointment with W&I is made. For more information, see Arranging the initial meeting with Work and incomc.



Note:
The ACC case manager must discuss with the claimant all the information that will be disclosed to W&J, to ensure the claimant is happy for the details to be released.


The ACC1T4S should only contain information that the claimant has agreed to disclose. Examples of information include:
  • Training given during vocational rehabilitation
  • Equipment supplied by ACC
  • Jobs for which the claimant has been assessed as being suitable and/or unsuitable

  • The claimant's CV developed during vocational rehabilitation.

The ACC case manager takes two copies of the ACC1143:
  • The original ACC1143 is given to the W&I case manager at the first meeting.

  • One copy is given to the claimant

  • One copy is placed on the claimant's ACC claim file.


Arranging the initial meeting with Work and Income
During the meeting with the ACC case manager, the claimant should contact W&I to make an appointment with a W&I case manager (Ph: 0800 559 009).

If the claimant does not want to make the appointment at this time, the ACC case manager should advise the claimant of the dates they are available.

An appointment is made with a W&I case manager at the most convenient office for the claimant,, on a date suitable for the claimant, and both the ACC and W&I case managers (if applicable).

Notes:
  • The claimant must advise W&I (when making the appointment) whether or not the ACC case manager will be attending.

  • W&I requires that the claimant make this appointment, to demonstrate the claimant's commitment to the referral.

If the claimant does not want the ACC case manager to be present at the handover meeting, the ACC case manager will post the referral form to the W&I case manager.


Handover meeting

A key part of the referral process is the first meeting between the claimant and the Work and Income (W&I) case manager. The meeting helps clarify and confirm the information contained on the referral form.



If the ACC case manager attends this meeting, they must personally introduce the claimant to the W&I case manager.



Once the initial introduction has been completed, the ACC case manager can leave the meeting. However, the length of time the claimant wants the ACC case manager to remain in the meeting, should be discussed before the meeting.



Note:
W&I allow one hour for the initial interview, and ask that ACC case managers are mindful of this tight scheduling.



Regional variations
Some W&I offices conduct group seminars as a preliminary to an individual interview. In these cases, alternative arrangements to handover the claimant will be agreed between the particular ACC and W&I offices involved.


If the claimant does not attend the handover meeting

If the claimant is unable to attend the arranged meeting with W&I, they must let the ACC case manager and W&I know as soon as possible and arrange an alternative time and date.


If the claimant did not want the ACC case manager to attend the handover meeting and then subsequently fails to attend, W&I will inform the ACC case manager of the claimant's non-attendance.


Closing the relationship between ACC and the claimant

The final stage in the referral process involves the ACC case manager contacting the claimant by phone, four weeks after the claimant has exited ACC.

The ACC case manager calls the claimant to check on their progress with finding employment, and to bring the relationship between ACC and the claimant to a close.

During this call the ACC case manager records the claimant's current work status on Pathway as one of the following:
  • Now in employment

  • Continuing job search while receiving (type of) benefit

  • No longer seeking employment, receiving (type of) benefit.

Procedure: Referring exiting vocationally independent claimants to Work and Income

The ACC case manager follows the steps below to refer an exiting vocationally independent claimant to Work and Income (W&I).
  • Contact the claimant to arrange a meeting four weeks before the end of their 12-week transitional job search.

  • Discuss the referral to W&I with the claimant.

  • Ensure the claimant is happy be referred and have their vocational rehabilitation information disclosed to w&I

    http://nz.msnusers.c...IA%23%21%21.JPG

  • Complete the ACC1i4S3 with the claimant and confirm the claimant will make the handover appointment with Wall



  • Determine if the claimant wants to have the ACC case manager at the W&I meeting.

    http://nz.msnusers.c...%2FVIA%2312.JPG


  • Attend the handover meeting at W&I with the claimantr if required.

  • Contact the claimant four weeks after they have exited from ACC and record their current work status in Pathway and close the file.

  • Referral to Work and Income

  • Referral to Work and Income
  • Referral to Work and Income

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#6 User is offline   Accme 

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Posted 20 January 2005 - 08:21 PM

"During this call the ACC case manager records the claimant's current work status on Pathway as one of the following"
Hang on a minute .... if this is recorded .... then there is statistical information on exactly how many claimants find work , go on sicknes, go on invalids, go on unemployment benefits.
Wasn't the minister asked a question in parliament on these figures, and didn't she say she could not answer.
Maybe I'm wrong lets hope so, otherwise she has mislead parliament, and we all know what happens to a minister when they do that.
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#7 User is offline   Paradigm Shift 

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Posted 20 January 2005 - 09:02 PM

as a person is incapacitated to earn by way of injury rehabilitation remains gaining the same capacity to earn.

The vocational independents assessment as a focus on relabelling as opposed to rehabilitation. Rehabilitation to earn means having marketable work task capacities to achieve earnings. It does not mean the attachment of an occupational label where there is a theoretical capacity to earn.

If a person has been labeled as having a capacity to earn but there is still medical certificates confirming this not to be true the Corporation is obliged to accept the veracity of the medical certificate. when a post disentitlement medical certificate is obtain and it is critical to have the medical assessor, your doctor, described the inability of each and every task of the alleged occupation whereby a medical barrier exists. It would also be a good idea to get a report from a person in the occupation industry to swear an affidavit that says you are not employable for that occupation if the excluded tasks cannot be performed.

Unfortunately there does not seem to be any organisation in New Zealand, including the most prestigious law firms, that have addressed this issue of disentitlement/re entitlement by way of presenting irrefutable industry-standard and medical fact.

Those interested in having their assessed occupations described by those qualified in the alleged occupation and the task fact assembled in such a way for a medical professional to describe continued incapacity for those tasks you may contact me directly through the e-mail address when clicking on my form site e-mail address. If you wish I were return direct contact details.
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#8 User is offline   jocko 

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Posted 30 January 2005 - 03:23 PM

List of Initial Medical Assessors, as provided by Greymouth ACC

Dr Richard Blackmore
Dr David Richards
Dr Rob Williams
Dr Paul Fogarty
Dr Jorgen Schusboe
Dr Patrick Mulhern
Dr Robert Biggs
Dr David Kerr
Dr Jonathan Wright
Dr Murray Smith
Dr Winfred Turner
Dr Keith Murray
Dr Christopher Strack
Dr Xiong
Dr Graham McGeoch
Dr Alec Marshall
Dr John Hellemans
Dr John McVicar
Dr Mark Floyd
Dr Neil Averis
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#9 User is offline   flowers 

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Posted 30 January 2005 - 04:44 PM

despite myriadd requests for vocational assisstance over the last 12 years there has never been a reply except verbal denial by my case mongrel.
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#10 User is offline   doppelganger 

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Posted 30 January 2005 - 04:57 PM

Flowers section 80 is clear of the corporation objective in matters concering Vocational rehabilitation.

80 (1 ) 9(c ) is clear that you are only going to get assessment after assessment after assessment until Vocational independence is acheived, or you get tyred of te process.

Assessments are not rehabilitation. They are a means to guild the stupid and dum to provide entitlements. Section 80 (1) © should be deleated from the Act as its only purpose is to deny rehabilitation and fill the blites with in a certain group being feed part of Judge Holes Gold.
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#11 User is offline   doppelganger 

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Posted 26 July 2009 - 03:44 PM

this is the fees as at 2006.

Attached File(s)


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#12 User is offline   Moeroa 

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Posted 11 December 2009 - 01:01 AM

Interesting thread - another golden oldie but useful.

 flowers, on Jan 30 2005, 06:44 PM, said:

despite myriadd requests for vocational assisstance over the last 12 years there has never been a reply except verbal denial by my case mongrel.
Yep, you gotta wonder about that aye.

 Easyrider, on Sep 6 2006, 06:26 PM, said:

Or here is a goodie,
Takiura strikes again.
Check out the skills assessment received by me from another claimant:

 BLURB, on Oct 30 2009, 09:44 PM, said:

Watch your back with the new one

If anyone thought some members of this forum were control freaks and or master malipuators then wait till you get my old mate Leanne MacDonnell as a case manager

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