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Lawyer in Dunedin or Christchurch who is Pro-Bono?

#1 User is offline   karrie001 

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Posted 11 April 2016 - 09:03 PM

Has anyone used a lawyer in Dunedin or Christchurch that will work on a pro-Bono basis?
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#2 User is offline   REX 

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Posted 12 April 2016 - 12:29 AM

Hi I see your question has been unanswered,

You can seek the help of any Acc advocate, they are a cheaper option who are paid by the Acc if they take the case through on your behalf and are successful.

They are found under rocks anywhere in the country, but bare in mind a local advocate would be best if going for an advocate, as they have limited/less financial gain.(you really want them at the venue of hearing)

They will seek a full copy file and any relevant progress for your case up to the date requested of the copy file, to get a full understanding of your predicament.

You just provide them consent to assist on behalf, if they feel confident they can win they will represent you.

Time frames you must adhere to for review and appeal can be stretched, by timely "request" in most cases if the first can't help your case. (Not always)

I would seek that first unless you can afford to pay for the lawyer fees and depending on your predicament.

The lawyer fees are yours to pay and that is your choice, lawyers who assists you would be able to make it to court from anywhere.($)

Not many lawyers do pro bono cases, as it can drag on and their time is unpaid till/if/if/if a settlement/back pay is paid.., however you can try and it would MOST LIKELY be an agreement of percentage portion of settlement. (If there is any to be paid out...)

You can always seek lawyers help and depending on your financial situation, you might be allegeable for legal aid.

Not all specialist Acc lawyers do legal aid work either.

When it comes to pro bono cases in any type of case, it would have to be highly rewarding...

Sorry I can't help point you to a pro bono lawyer, and as far I've heard its highly unlikely but someone else may know of one.

Good luck ;)/>
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#3 User is offline   kittyhawk 

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Posted 12 April 2016 - 07:22 AM

Hi there, supporting the points made by Rex there are some very good advocates out there and yes most are as effective as any lawyer.

An advocate for a review will usually not charge (costs are awarded by fairway) and costs for a DC appeal for a good case will be a small additional charge (most advocates are ok with what the court awards) of what any lawyer will charge. There are advocates that will attend a review via teleconference so shop around

Pro bono should be avoided at all cost, this comment also applies to advocates, there are claimants who have paid up to 20% of an entitlement in fees - consider a drip feed arrangement.

Good luck
kitty
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#4 User is offline   Alan Thomas 

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Posted 12 April 2016 - 11:34 AM

View Postkittyhawk, on 12 April 2016 - 07:22 AM, said:

Hi there, supporting the points made by Rex there are some very good advocates out there and yes most are as effective as any lawyer.

An advocate for a review will usually not charge (costs are awarded by fairway) and costs for a DC appeal for a good case will be a small additional charge (most advocates are ok with what the court awards) of what any lawyer will charge. There are advocates that will attend a review via teleconference so shop around

Pro bono should be avoided at all cost, this comment also applies to advocates, there are claimants who have paid up to 20% of an entitlement in fees - consider a drip feed arrangement.

Good luck
kitty


Fairway do not pay the Regulated costs of service. Check with your regulations and please make your corrections so as not to confuse.

The prescribed and regulated rate Is insufficient for all but the most simple cases.

Pro bono means free without any charge whatsoever and is not the same thing nor should be confused with contingency fees which are only payable upon the lawyer winning. The accepted norm is more like 30% not just in New Zealand but in most countries.

I am in favour of contingency fees as it attracts only the most competent lawyers,, particularly in complex cases, who put their time and energy is where their mouth is. Incompetent representation steer well clear of this arrangement.

The difference between representation who are satisfied with the regulated fees only I usually the bottom of the barrel and of course you get what you pay for.
Representation who work pro bono (free) frequently do so to score brownie points with the legal fraternity. Lawyers are encouraged to do a small percentage of work pro bono which means they will only take the most simple or trouble-free cases.
Contingency payment arrangements are most popular in places like America we have the legal system is the most superior in all the world.
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#5 User is offline   kittyhawk 

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Posted 12 April 2016 - 12:11 PM

At Alan's request - I am aware the prescribed sums for a review are insufficient, I stand by my experiences that there are excellent advocates out there, as capable as any acc specialist lawyer.

It is also correct that the prescribed amounts are insufficient that said there are still good willing advocates willing to take cases on that bases.

I am also aware of the difference between pro bono and contingency fees. There are firms that will take pro bono work BUT if successful the contract changes to a contingency fee.

TWO FIRMS to do pro bono work are DLA Phillips Fox and Kennsington Swan - I have no knowledge of the criteria for acceptance.

Good luck in your search,
Kitty
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#6 User is offline   Alan Thomas 

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Posted 12 April 2016 - 12:39 PM

My observations in blue

View Postkittyhawk, on 12 April 2016 - 12:11 PM, said:

At Alan's request - I am aware the prescribed sums for a review are insufficient, I stand by my experiences that there are excellent advocates out there, as capable as any acc specialist lawyer.
Sadly there are very few specialist ACC lawyers. Such lawyers certainly do not go into the ACC specialty field for a profit motive or to improve their career prospects.

It is also correct that the prescribed amounts are insufficient that said there are still good willing advocates willing to take cases on that bases.
Likewise there are many who are not legally trained acting as advocates who are very good heart and willing to do all that is within their ability.

I am also aware of the difference between pro bono and contingency fees. There are firms that will take pro bono work BUT if successful the contract changes to a contingency fee.
If a person claimant to be qualified in law offers a pro bono arrangement and seeks contingency fees I would run a mile. How did someone offer something for free and then demand a fee. In days gone by it was unlawful for a lawyer to do business on the basis of a contingency of success fee. This leads me to believe that such lawyers not wanting to be tarred with the stigma of an outdated unlawful brush by offering pro bono work but still was to be paid as more than just a little bit two-faced. They are either free or they are not. Sadly desperate claimants who both physically and financially impoverished deterrent raise any question in such desperate circumstances.


TWO FIRMS to do pro bono work are DLA Phillips Fox and Kennsington Swan - I have no knowledge of the criteria for acceptance.
I think you will find that all reputable law firms will do pro bono work particularly if they perceive a worthy cause. My recommendation would be to go shopping for a pro bono lawyer. Many lawyers would be perfectly capable of dealing with ACC matter and would welcome a chance to have a look at this aspect of law pro bono. Usually will depend upon how busy they are.

Good luck in your search,
Kitty

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