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#1 User is offline   anonymousey 

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 07:59 AM

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#2 User is offline   Alan Thomas 

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 10:23 AM

View Postanonymousey, on 16 September 2015 - 07:59 AM, said:

On a side note because I rarely see this issue of underpayment reported - there once was clear research with other comparable benefit providers showing that this problem [plus staff errors] was much more common and significantly involved more money than any *overpayment* circumstances. If I also remember correctly - once staff errors were separated from potential overpayments - then it was clearer sadly that any mythology and demonization of beneficiaries as fraudsters was being greatly overestimated and possibly even less than similar staff fraudsters working within the benefit officers Posted Image/>


As I made a written complaint and sought reimbursement I now expect to be paid that reimbursement regardless as to whether or not they change the law after the fact.
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#3 User is offline   Alan Thomas 

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 07:02 PM

Let us not forget that being paid a day late, even for decades such as in my case, that we are only talking about one day which is not cumulative. So let's say over two decades that would mean something like $50 plus interest on that $50 for two decades which for argument's sake let's say is $100 that I have been deprived of four 2 decades. While that amount of money is very important to someone is impoverished as myself and the money is important I think the real issue is the principal of the matter whereby respect and credibility is further destroyed thus harming the relationship between claimant and government servants who are meant to be looking after our interests but rather seek to look after their own interests at our loss. The same goes for a government that seeks to retrospectively create a law solely in purely to steal from the poor in order that the rich do not need to be taxed quite so much.
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#4 User is offline   MINI 

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Posted 17 September 2015 - 02:34 PM

View PostAlan Thomas, on 16 September 2015 - 07:02 PM, said:

Let us not forget that being paid a day late, even for decades such as in my case, that we are only talking about one day which is not cumulative. So let's say over two decades that would mean something like $50 plus interest on that $50 for two decades which for argument's sake let's say is $100 that I have been deprived of four 2 decades. While that amount of money is very important to someone is impoverished as myself and the money is important I think the real issue is the principal of the matter whereby respect and credibility is further destroyed thus harming the relationship between claimant and government servants who are meant to be looking after our interests but rather seek to look after their own interests at our loss. The same goes for a government that seeks to retrospectively create a law solely in purely to steal from the poor in order that the rich do not need to be taxed quite so much.


There are people like Blurb, myself and others, who were on again off again, working in between, making it more than just a one off payment and the interest in those days was 11%, so it would add up to a nice little amount. Even enough to get a little trip somewhere for xmas.

After taking into consideration a couple of things I cant see us having successfully gained belated ACC, being entitled though. Still maybe worth to try to get back some of which has been wrongfully retained by ACC and IRD. Every little helps.

And don't forget the indexation rate on that money each year as well. Pretty!!

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#5 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 17 September 2015 - 02:54 PM

Various departments, including telecommunications providers are also guilty of ripping people off for a day on services provided so it isn't just restricted to those on benefits.

These same departments are quick to charge penalties and drag there clients through legal battles when overpayments occur so what's good for the goose is good for the gander!

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#6 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 19 November 2015 - 03:37 PM

Good on Aaron Tily, the administrator of a Facebook advocacy page having his name disclosed as Admin of the site involved as any responsible Administrative person would.



Work and Income could pay out millions in 'missed days' payments


LAURA MCQUILLAN

Last updated 07:40, November 13 2015
http://www.stuff.co....d-days-payments

Christmas has come early for hundreds of past and present beneficiaries, with Work and Income forking out $26,600 this week in back-pay for "missed days".


And a beneficiary advocate believes there could be tens of millions of dollars in payments to follow, as Work and Income makes good on 18 years' worth of unpaid entitlements.

This week, it backpaid 253 people an average of $105 each, following a long-time payment blunder that was revealed seven weeks ago.

Aaron Tily, the administrator of a Facebook advocacy page, was among the first to receive payments.
FACEBOOK

Aaron Tily, the administrator of a Facebook advocacy page, was among the first to receive payments.

Between June 3, 1998, and September 28 this year, Work and Income waited an extra day after applicants' stand-down periods ended before making their initial benefit payments.

Under the law, it should have paid on the same day the stand-down lifted.

The government's known of the mistake since early this year, and introduced legislation in June to retrospectively change the "missing day" provision, so all of the erroneous payments would have been legitimised.

Beneficiary advocate Kay Brereton says potentially hundreds of thousands of people could be owed up to $700.
COLIN SMITH

Beneficiary advocate Kay Brereton says potentially hundreds of thousands of people could be owed up to $700.

The amendment was tucked inside a wider social security bill, but long-time beneficiary advocate Kay Brereton spotted the tiny tweak in September, while preparing a select committee submission.

"I was stunned, to be honest, that they thought that was an okay thing to do," she said.

Since then, Brereton's been helping beneficiaries past and present claim what they're owed.

By November 10, 632 people had asked Work and Income to review their cases.


READ MORE: Underpaid benefits could cost government millions

The Ministry of Social Development said 56 cases were found to have no entitlements owing, 253 were paid and the rest were still being processed.

Brereton says the biggest payout she's heard of so far is about $300, but bigger payments could follow.

She believed there could be hundreds of thousands of people owed money, some for several years' worth of missed days' payments.

"With people who have been doing seasonal work - meat-workers, some people who are working in schools as teacher aides, things like that - those people might have been on and off benefits every year and had a stand-down every year, and be owed a day [for each year]."

The price of one day depended on the benefit and the year, but Brereton calculated it would be an average of $40 - meaning long-term claimants could be owed up to $700 or more.

"It is huge," she said.

Work and Income declined to put a figure on how much it owed.

It changed its processes on September 29, so anyone granted a benefit from that date received their first payment on the same day their stand-down ended.

The retrospective legislation, once passed, will change that to the day after the stand-down ends - the way Work and Income has paid it for the last 18 years.

Brereton has helped set up a Facebook page and website where potential claimants can access a generic letter to send to Work and Income, asking for a review.

The Facebook page had nearly 7000 members on Friday morning. The group's administrator, Aaron Tily, said he had received $93.

Brereton is prepared for some public pushback - but says the claimants are simply seeking what they're legally entitled to.

"The people with the biggest claims, they're the people who're going to work when there's work, and having to go back onto the benefit when that work stops.

"It's the system ripping off the poor people, rather than the people ripping off the system."
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