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Flooding/sensory Overload

#1 User is offline   Chasann 

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Posted 26 April 2015 - 10:24 AM

If your brain injury has left you with sensory overload/flooding check this video out
http://nbia.ca/flooding-video/ Fatigue, gauging just how far to take it before the body shuts down, learning just what causes the fatigue, tools to minimize it or control it. It's not easy when you live in a world of dense fog which fortunately gets less over time. You can't see (for the most part)or test flooding but you sure can experience it. But how do you get others to understand. Heard someone say that a bike pump had been used to pump air into her head until it was ready to explode . . .
The eye specialist was able to explain so much - that sharp penetrating pain which shoots through your head, stopping you in your tracks and leaving just as quickly as it comes is unique to brain injury, and to a selected few. He described it as knife being thrust into the eye, penetrating then being quickly extracted, a good analogy. Despite much research it remains a mystery.
The visual disturbances, banging into walls and distance perception errors are atypical of overload, you have to learn how to control it, exposing yourself gradually to that which causes overload. Within 2 or 3 years these symptoms should have resolved and if not it may be permanent, time will tell. This view contrasting strongly with views of some others I have been to but I know which one is true for me.
I have come to the conclusion it is about building a tool kit, having in the kit the tools/skill set to cope with varying conditions/situations knowing that every brain injury/person is different - there is not a one cure fits all.
I attended ANZAC service wearing customary dark glasses but by also resting on a post, eyes closed I could concentrate on the words being spoken, assimilate them without the distraction of the colours of clothing, trees etc but it has taken some months to get to this understanding thus less draining and a feeling of greater confidence driving home.
I really appreciate the help received to date, speech therapist acknowledging I am now visual, suggests keeping my bucket half full, as opposed to keeping the battery charged, just a shame the bucket has a hole in it at the moment! But I find the bucket excellent and am learning how to keep water in it.
Sharing is caring, Arohanui.
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#2 User is offline   unit1of2 

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Posted 30 April 2015 - 12:59 AM

Sharp pain like a knife driven into your eye...... for me it goes severely into the depth of the inside of my brain and then hurls further back like it wants to penetrate the back of my scull. It is one of the worse pains and it nearly knocks me out. Du Plessis held his small torch into my eye, my bad eye, held it there for ages and I began to feel that pain but on a very minor scale... NO doctor has ever held a torch to my eye like that ever. When he removed it, my eye pain went berserk! My vision went weird, with silver discs floating over my eye, and it felt like my pupil was pulled tightly open. I wasn't able to talk and held my eye rocking where I was sitting. As it began to settle I started to say that my eye was having a painful kind of spasm, but Du Plessis just over rode me on another topic...... pffft....

Visual, immediate loss of eye sight from the moment of accident and never recovered it, fast deteriorating due to the noted eye muscle wasting attributed to Head Trauma.

FATIGUE... HUGE... improvements over time BUT never have I managed to resolve it. I try and manage it best I can.

TINNITUS... arrrrrrrhG... Both ears!!

MEMORY.... over years with a similar type of tactic of the bucket half full theory, found it works. My bucket though isn't very big of course since my accident. Learning your cut off point and when to push yourself, testing thresh holds over the months and years to see where your new level of coping is at. For me I have improved, but I cannot overload, and I still have bad moments and really bad days/weeks... I have met my stale mate now. It's been over 10 years now...... I have pushed myself over the years, tried to claw back some resemblance of who I was in a coping sense. I am not able to do or partake in past activities ever again, so thankfully after a long long durations of years I found I am able to cope better at a craft type thing that has helped my concentration, which in turn has helped my ability to relax my brain when trying to reclaim a memory or word finding and establishing word streaming in discussions.
FATIGUE however will always be an issue, this I have a constant battle with and also the weeks of terrible sleep patterns. I take steps to try and reclaim a good sleep pattern, but I have found it is so very easy to become unsync'd and fall out of a pattern to.

Pushing oneself and pushing against fatigue to can cause anxiety....! Stressing over those immediate blanks and missed appointments or other such dates can make you susceptible to Anxiety!! Big anxiety and panic attacks. So these things one has to learn to address, or ones blood pressure becomes yet another issue, Hypertension!.....

Some of us out there are silent battlers.. We are the ones that have been forced to drop off, slipped through the cracks and left to deal with the A Hole GP's, Specialists (toads and ACC) and all their dodgy ill contrived reports that are on a system now with our ENP number against them. These reports still being used against you, whilst your never going to be given proper, decent full 'Independent' diagnostics and treatment/rehab.
WINZ ringing up your GP and they discuss that your able to work 15+ to 30hrs work/week but with some tweeking... It doesn't matter that you have discussed your concerns, that you have discussed your negatives that hinder you. NO, your apparent concerns for yourself and you concerns about NOT FEELING SAFE with decisions being made over your head, and out of your scope of coping are 'totally ignored'..... Arrogantly ignored.

It doesn't matter that your stress and anxiety levels will climb and you haven't even left your crib. Funny how differently one manages their symptoms when going off to do a couple of hours here and there voluntary, with oneself in control of your situation. Knowing folk understand your issues and no deliberate expectations are loaded on you. That when you crash and burn your in good hands and or able to go home, safe and safely. Your not being judged unfairly, or discriminated against for your failings.


Sorry my wee rant. I don't know who is worse... ACC or WINZ..... They do not listen and they do not care about you the person, about you the damaged person, who knows one's limitations better than they do. Head trauma and physical issues that have had a huge impact on life and living from day one after the accident. Left now coping with the residual issues that sadly won't go away and leave you free to get on with work and living.
Yes it matters that we try and see what it is we can do, not what we cannot do. Sadly though, WINZ don't take into account other issues either, of how does a damaged person cope at home, getting to a place of employment and home safely, coping with stairs, coping with the fatigue after pushing themselves on the job and not then able to cope getting home safely. Personally I know what it's like and it's scary, very scary! BUT WINZ will say 'it's not their problem'.... They are only there to get you into employment, period, nothing else. The business of your health and safely, getting to and from home and work is your/my problem. If your less able to cope due to fatigue, and your health issues, not their problem, it's yours. So if your like me another ACC victim, further traumatised by their illegal and evil system, and you have head trauma issues, and other body issues that hinder you with pain/stiffness and difficulties walking, OR you have other issues but a victim of our lovely NZ govt schemes.... I wish you all the very best going forward. Hopefully your able to survive it and find some balance of 'Coping with Head Trauma issues, and or Physical issues' and our defunct Systems of NZ... that clearly don't work for all the damaged folk of NZ...




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#3 User is offline   MINI 

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Posted 30 April 2015 - 04:58 PM

View PostChasann, on 26 April 2015 - 10:24 AM, said:

If your brain injury has left you with sensory overload/flooding check this video out
http://nbia.ca/flooding-video/ Fatigue, gauging just how far to take it before the body shuts down, learning just what causes the fatigue, tools to minimize it or control it. It's not easy when you live in a world of dense fog which fortunately gets less over time. You can't see (for the most part)or test flooding but you sure can experience it. But how do you get others to understand. Heard someone say that a bike pump had been used to pump air into her head until it was ready to explode . . .
The eye specialist was able to explain so much - that sharp penetrating pain which shoots through your head, stopping you in your tracks and leaving just as quickly as it comes is unique to brain injury, and to a selected few. He described it as knife being thrust into the eye, penetrating then being quickly extracted, a good analogy. Despite much research it remains a mystery.
The visual disturbances, banging into walls and distance perception errors are atypical of overload, you have to learn how to control it, exposing yourself gradually to that which causes overload. Within 2 or 3 years these symptoms should have resolved and if not it may be permanent, time will tell. This view contrasting strongly with views of some others I have been to but I know which one is true for me.
I have come to the conclusion it is about building a tool kit, having in the kit the tools/skill set to cope with varying conditions/situations knowing that every brain injury/person is different - there is not a one cure fits all.
I attended ANZAC service wearing customary dark glasses but by also resting on a post, eyes closed I could concentrate on the words being spoken, assimilate them without the distraction of the colours of clothing, trees etc but it has taken some months to get to this understanding thus less draining and a feeling of greater confidence driving home.
I really appreciate the help received to date, speech therapist acknowledging I am now visual, suggests keeping my bucket half full, as opposed to keeping the battery charged, just a shame the bucket has a hole in it at the moment! But I find the bucket excellent and am learning how to keep water in it.
Sharing is caring, Arohanui.

Chasane

Thank you for being such an inspiration at this time in this year especially of making the truly extreme effort you did to go to the ANZAC Pararde.

The centenary of the landing of the Anzac's on Galipolli, it will never come again, and it is most inspiring that you have challenaged you disabilities by being there 'Lest we forget'.

A recent case has come through my e-mail which shows clearly the cases such as yours not to be taken too lightly. The massive effort taken to overcome the effects of your injury.

This case is Kevin Houghton v ACC [2015] NZACC72. ACR 232/14 It is a win for Mr Houghton and is heard in front of Judge Henare. It shows that lateness of a application of Review, (Therefore I think for any application, in these circumstances), can be extrodinary circumstances, as to the effects of the injury and what it does to you. This is a very important decision by Judge Henare and is terrific case law for all persons like yourself.

Thank you for the information you have given and I hope you find this case helpful as well.

Mini
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