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IRD Staff fraud/ dishonesty - accessing IRD computer records

#1 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 03:45 PM

THE PRESS, 7 JAN 2004, Edition 2, Page 5.

IRD officer admits taking $90,000

By: CALCOTT Dean

A former Inland Revenue Department officer who used its computers to swindle his employer of $90,000 did it because he found requests from associates hard to refuse, the court has been told.

Former IRD return and debt officer Anitelea Ta'ase, 31, who admitted eight counts of using documents to defraud, was sentenced to 200 hours community work by Christchurch District Court Judge Edward Ryan.

He was also ordered to pay $3000 reparation -- the IRD is recovering the rest directly from recipients -- and to supervision for six months.

The judge said Ta'ase, a first offender, devised a system where he accessed IRD computer records to provide illicit payments to associates.


The net result was Ta'ase got more than $90,000, in some cases being paid for his efforts by recipients.

"The behaviour has to be emphatically condemned," Ryan said.

It was not so long ago the Crimes Act provided a special category of punishment for government employees. "The fundamental question is that it was a grave abuse of your responsibilities,"
he said.

Lawyer Medona Cherry
said Ta'ase had simply found it difficult to say no to requests for help.

He realised what he did was stupid and was devastated he had compromised his own mana. He had already sought independent counselling.

Ta'ase felt shame and humiliation within his Samoan community. He had been dismissed for the offending and lost all future prospects of a white-collar job. Cherry asked the judge for a sentence allowing his labouring job to continue so he could pay reparation.

Ryan said Ta'ase was otherwise well thought of, being noted for integrity, honesty and reliability. It was significant he recognised the disgrace he brought on himself. It was unlikely he would be back before the court, the judge said.
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#2 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 03:46 PM

STUFF — THE PRESS — NATIONAL NEWS — 8 JAN 2004
Another in a string of public service crimes

The conviction of a Housing New Zealand employee yesterday for stealing $9102 from the agency is the latest in a string of public service crimes.



Fili Taaletupa, 33,
was sentenced to 150 hours of community work and a year's supervision after admitting in Christchurch District Court a charge of theft as a servant.

On Monday, former Inland Revenue Department return and debt officer Anitelea Ta'ase was sentenced to 200 hours community work for providing $90,000 of illicit tax returns to associates, in some cases in exchange for payment.

The IRD would say little about the case yesterday, refusing to give details on how the fraud was committed, how long it continued, or whether the recipients of the refunds would be prosecuted.

Christchurch acting manager Adriaan Geerlofs
said the department was in the process of contacting the recipients and asking them to repay the money.

In November, State Services Commissioner Michael Wintringham spoke about the need for vigilance to prevent corruption in the public service.

But a local corporate security consultant says corruption in government departments is hard to guard against.

Fraud examiner John Dierckx
said it was "virtually impossible" to prevent corruption occurring at some level.

"You're looking at an organisation that deals with a massive amount of transactions every day. The fact they found out means they are probably monitoring reasonably adequately."

All workplaces required a degree of trust to function properly, but organisations needed to take measures to deny employees the opportunity to steal, including background checks. He said many workplaces were too trusting of their employees.

"Make sure that you know about employees, who their families and associates are. Maybe you should have a policy that people shouldn't be able to make transactions for people who are too close to them."

Many well-designed security systems were compromised in daily practice.

"Walk around your office and see how many people have a Post-It note on their computer with their log-in on it."
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#3 User is offline   MINI 

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 04:17 PM

View Posthukildaspida, on 30 June 2014 - 03:46 PM, said:

STUFF — THE PRESS — NATIONAL NEWS — 8 JAN 2004
Another in a string of public service crimes

The conviction of a Housing New Zealand employee yesterday for stealing $9102 from the agency is the latest in a string of public service crimes.



Fili Taaletupa, 33,
was sentenced to 150 hours of community work and a year's supervision after admitting in Christchurch District Court a charge of theft as a servant.

On Monday, former Inland Revenue Department return and debt officer Anitelea Ta'ase was sentenced to 200 hours community work for providing $90,000 of illicit tax returns to associates, in some cases in exchange for payment.

The IRD would say little about the case yesterday, refusing to give details on how the fraud was committed, how long it continued, or whether the recipients of the refunds would be prosecuted.

Christchurch acting manager Adriaan Geerlofs
said the department was in the process of contacting the recipients and asking them to repay the money.

In November, State Services Commissioner Michael Wintringham spoke about the need for vigilance to prevent corruption in the public service.

But a local corporate security consultant says corruption in government departments is hard to guard against.

Fraud examiner John Dierckx
said it was "virtually impossible" to prevent corruption occurring at some level.

"You're looking at an organisation that deals with a massive amount of transactions every day. The fact they found out means they are probably monitoring reasonably adequately."

All workplaces required a degree of trust to function properly, but organisations needed to take measures to deny employees the opportunity to steal, including background checks. He said many workplaces were too trusting of their employees.

"Make sure that you know about employees, who their families and associates are. Maybe you should have a policy that people shouldn't be able to make transactions for people who are too close to them."

Many well-designed security systems were compromised in daily practice.

"Walk around your office and see how many people have a Post-It note on their computer with their log-in on it."


I never saw anyone's log-in number when I worked for the govt. Not that I can or would want to remember anyway.

That is like saying because you are too lazy to look after it properly, someone else could log-in as you and use it! Do you deserve a job when you are that thick!! First you must look after yourself, then you have time to assist others, but not to the extent they are saying some public servants are!!

Never cease to amaze me, the amount of people who ruin their lives by doing dishonest stuff. So arrogant they think they will get away with it, or just don't care one way or the other!!

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#4 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 05:11 PM

We question if staff security & safety of information has been improved from ten years ago when this happened.
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