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Acc Monopoly Delivers Body Blow To Farmers

#21 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 27 March 2013 - 10:26 PM

Inquests into cluster of quad bike deaths begin
4:01 PM Tuesday Mar 26, 2013

http://www.nzherald....jectid=10873762

Photo / Thinkstock

Inquests into a string of quad bike fatalities have begun in Whangarei today.


Northland coroner Brandt Shortland said the inquest into Northland farmer John Roderick McInnes, also known as Jack, was the first of five inquests involving quad bikes he would hear over the next six weeks - including a cluster of three deaths within eight weeks in Northland.

During a two-day inquest in Auckland next month Mr Shortland would hear from a number of experts, including academics, government representatives, safety officials and those in the rural sector.

He would hear all the evidence and then make recommendations which he said would be a collaborative effort with community input.

"The issue around quad bike safety is very complex," he told those at today's hearing.

Mr McInnes died on September 25 when the quad bike he was using to spray weeds rolled on him at Marua, 20km south-east of Whangarei. He was riding the vehicle on a steep hill across rough ground when it rolled 180 degrees and pinned him face-down.

He was found by his daughter and her husband.

The inquest into the death Arapohue farmer and builder Carlos Mendoza, 52, will be held tomorrow in Whangarei followed by Suzanne Claudia Ferguson, 62.

Mr Mendoza died in a quad bike accident on September 16 near Dargaville.

Mrs Ferguson was towing a trailer of haylage on August 9, 2010 when her quad bike is thought to have rolled on steep terrain, pinning her underneath at a Gammon Rd farm near Awarua, about 20km south of Kaikohe.

The Chief Coroner last year raised concerns about the number of quad bike fatalities. He said previously that the inquests were being heard together to determine if there was anything in common among the deaths that could then be used to improve quad bike safety.

Last year the Ministry of Business Innovation and Employment launched a safety campaign after several quad-bike deaths across the country.

Every year, on average, 850 people are injured, on farms, riding quad bikes, with five deaths.

However, the number of annual deaths has risen sharply in recent years, prompting the ministry to release several safety guidelines.

It says quad-bike riders must be trained/experienced enough to do the job; should choose the right vehicle for the job; always wear a helmet and children should not ride adult quad bikes.

Farmers who don't follow those safety steps risk penalties under the Health and Safety in Employment Act if someone working on their farm is seriously injured or killed.

The ministry also recommends that quad bikes be maintained in a safe condition; riders take care on slopes and rough terrain; don't exceed the capabilities of the bike; don't do tasks that interfere with safe riding and keep both hands on the bike, with eyes on the ground in front.

- NORTHERN ADVOCATE

Man injured after quad bike rolls
ACC claims for quad bike accidents drop - research
$5k in exit lunches after ACC clearout
Probe set for links in quad bike deaths

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#22 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 14 June 2013 - 05:37 PM

It is great to see New Zealander's doing something proactive & inventive to help prevent quad bike accidents.


ATV Lifeguard

http://atvlifeguard.co.nz/


http://atvlifeguard....ia_quad_safety/

Ever heard that story that a Quad is more dangerous with a Roll Bar than without one? We have – lots, and it may be true in some cases. With the ’Lifeguard®’ all these stories don’t stack up, and we can guarantee you that a ’Lifeguard®’ hitting you in the event of a roll-over, will be a lot more comfortable than the full weight of a quad..

Although there are still areas on the quad that can cause harm, and a ‘Lifeguard®’ may not save a life in some cases, but view it like a seat-belt in a car. If you brought a car with no seatbelts in it, what would you do? Some people don’t use them, and die in the event of a crash – some survive. Others wear them and have a really bad crash and still their seat-belt doesn’t save them. But think of the countless times seat-belts have saved lives in car crashes…

A seat-belt on a quad is defiantly more dangerous with one than with out, and we don’t recommend that at all. But now you have the ’Lifeguard®’ as an option for some extra safety, which may or may not save your life in a quad accident, but with one attached, you or your wife, husband, worker and friends will be a lot safer, and you don’t even have to ‘make it click’!!


Please note, that the ‘Lifeguard®’ cannot be attached to plastic carriers. For example most new Polaris’s and Can-am’s it may not suit.



* The “Lifeguard” is a segmented Roll Bar that helps give crush protection on an upturned Quad and is less likely to cause injury to the rider.
* This is because of it’s flexible construction. It is designed to hold up a Quad in excess of 350kg and can be simply mounted to the rear carrier. Special tests by Landcorp NZ and IRL has established it does not significantly alter the stability of the Quad.
* 2 or 3 dogs can comfortably ride inside the “Lifeguard”. In fact it gives them a support to lean against which helps prevent them being thrown off.
* - Flexible but cannot collapse
- Helps a Quad ‘bounce’ off you
- NEW concept and WORLD 1st in ATV Safety
- Spreads the weight and can support over 1200kg
- Will mould around you in the event of a rollover
- Makes it possible to push a Quad off from on top you
- It’s possible to wriggle out from underneath an up-turned Quad
- ARC shape assists rolling the Quad back onto its wheels
- Designed and Manufactured in New Zealand


ATV LIFEGUARD
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#23 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 06 March 2014 - 12:14 PM

Unfortunately more deaths on the farm, where many work alone and are not found until it's to late, in New Zealand.

Two farm workers dead in separate incidents
Last updated 20:28 05/03/2014

http://www.stuff.co....arate-incidents

Two farm workers are dead in separate incidents in the North and South Islands.

The first death occurred on a farm in Welcome Bay, south of Tauranga, yesterday, while police have attended another on a remote farm in Golden Bay in the Tasman region.

Tauranga police said a 66-year-old man was found with the quad bike about 5.45pm yesterday, but he had been missing since the morning.

St John Ambulance district operations manager Jeremy Gooders said an ambulance was dispatched to a private property in the Welcome Bay area just before 6pm yesterday.

They found a 66-year-old male deceased, he said.

"It looked like he'd come off a quad bike, he hadn't been seen for a number of hours and was found deceased."

The man had been dead for several hours by the time ambulance staff arrived, and no resuscitation was attempted, Gooders said.

The man was believed to be a farm worker, not the owner of the farm.

His death would be referred to the coroner.

Meanwhile, Nelson police were today called to a farm in Rakopi where the body of a 51-year-old farm worker was found near a quad bike.

Initially police said it appeared he had had a quad bike accident, but this evening a spokeswoman said the cause of death had not been established.

The man's body was found near the quad bike but "at this stage it does not appear that he has died as a result of a crash'', the spokeswoman said.

The man's body has been taken to Nelson for a post mortem.


- Fairfax NZ News
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Posted 19 June 2014 - 05:45 PM

Man seriously injures hand in hay feeder
3:07 PM Thursday Jun 19, 2014

http://www.nzherald....jectid=11277463

A man suffered serious injuries when his hand was caught in a hay feeder in rural Southland this morning.

Fire appliances from Waikaia and Lumsden were called to the Hurley Rd property, following reports the man had his hand caught in a hay feeder, about 9am.

On arrival volunteer firefighters called a local Riversdale contractor to the scene, who used a gas cutter to help free the man's hand.

"It takes a bit of guts to say they didn't have the right gear, and to call someone else," a Fire Service spokesman said.

"That made all the difference."

The injured man was later flown to Dunedin Hospital with severe injuries to his hand.

- Otago Daily Times
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#25 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 19 June 2014 - 05:50 PM

Family feel let down by St John
1:17 PM Thursday Jun 19, 2014

http://www.nzherald....jectid=11277419

The son of a Gisborne farmer who died after falling two metres has told an inquest the standard of care his father received from St John Ambulance was unacceptable.

Simon Kirkpatrick hopes no other family will have to endure a similar experience.

John Alexander Kirkpatrick, 72, died on January 14, 2013, after falling from hay bales on a tractor. At an inquest in Gisborne yesterday, the coroner was told the call to St John came at the same time as two ambulances and available staff were dealing with a critical cardiac case.

Simon Kirkpatrick questioned the quality of care provided to his father and criticised an ambulance officer for getting lost.

The family could have driven his father to hospital within 10 minutes, he said.

"We were let down."

Coroner Ian Smith
said everyone made mistakes in their vocation, including himself in past careers as a civil engineer and lawyer.


Family feel let down by St John
1:17 PM Thursday Jun 19, 2014

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Accidents
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Gisborne

File photo / Andrew Warner
File photo / Andrew Warner

The son of a Gisborne farmer who died after falling two metres has told an inquest the standard of care his father received from St John Ambulance was unacceptable.

Simon Kirkpatrick hopes no other family will have to endure a similar experience.

John Alexander Kirkpatrick, 72, died on January 14, 2013, after falling from hay bales on a tractor. At an inquest in Gisborne yesterday, the coroner was told the call to St John came at the same time as two ambulances and available staff were dealing with a critical cardiac case.

Simon Kirkpatrick questioned the quality of care provided to his father and criticised an ambulance officer for getting lost.

The family could have driven his father to hospital within 10 minutes, he said.

"We were let down."

Coroner Ian Smith said everyone made mistakes in their vocation, including himself in past careers as a civil engineer and lawyer.



"Sometimes we have to make a call."

It was unfortunate that a mistake made in the medical profession could have fatal consequences.

A decision to transport a family member to hospital was a decision for a family to make.

But there were times when such a decision could also have fatal consequences, said Mr Smith.

The court heard Mr Kirkpatrick landed on his head.

He was pronounced dead at Gisborne Hospital at 10.29am.

The first 111 call was made at 8.09am at a time when two Gisborne ambulances were attending a cardiac arrest incident -- a standard procedure.

The first ambulance arrived at the Kirkpatricks' Wharekopae Road property at 8.41am.

Simon Kirkpatrick said the lone ambulance officer took the wrong route and appeared stressed and unsure of what to do.


He felt sorry for the officer who had been put in such a position by St John.

Dr Craig Ellis, deputy medical director of St John, said an intensive care paramedic, a paramedic and two basic life support medics from the two Gisborne ambulances were required and busy at the cardiac arrest.

Mr Kirkpatrick's incident had originally been graded by an Auckland dispatcher and not deemed to be life threatening.

One of the basic life support medics was sent from the cardiac arrest to Wharekopae Road when that ambulance officer became available.

A second 111 call was later received, indicating Mr Kirkpatrick's condition had deteriorated and the priority rating was upgraded.

Dr Ellis said the system was not perfect.

St John received thousand of calls each day and operated with limited resources.

Ambulances were equipped with GPS and he could not explain how the first ambulance officer ended up on the wrong road.

Stephen Smith, St John district operations officer,
said the officer was in a challenging situation and followed the first aid "ABC rule" in tending Mr Kirkpatrick's "compromised" airways.

Intubation was tried by an officer who arrived later.

Dr Ellis said the other officers were treating someone who was critically ill and faced a difficult ethical situation of going to see another patient who might not need them.

It would have been ideal to send two ambulance officers but that was not possible at the time.

Tairawhiti District Health
now funded a third ambulance, which was used for transport but was also available to respond to emergencies.

The chances of what happened in Mr Kirkpatrick's case occurring again had been lowered but not eliminated.

Dr Ellis and Mr Smith said a rapid response unit manager had been established in Gisborne since Mr Kirkpatrick's death.

Gisborne ambulances now had additional staff and there was a national memorandum of understanding with the fire service to help ambulance officers.


The funding issue "was being looked at".

Simon Kirkpatrick questioned how the first ambulance officer could remember and record events that did not correspond with his memory of events, in a report prepared months later for the inquest.

St John had no system for recording deaths and he could not see any lessons being learned.


The coroner said he was astounded that ambulance officers did not create more extensive documentation than their contemporaneous patient record forms. He expected further records if someone died.

Pathologist Dr Katharine White said the cause of Mr Kirkpatrick's death was a combination of difficulty in getting oxygen into the lungs and loss of blood from severe tongue injuries suffered in a fall.

Mr Kirkpatrick was an aged man and existing coronary disease contributed to his death.

Mr Kirkpatrick was resuscitated from one cardiac arrest and suffered another.

He also suffered spinal injuries but Dr White did not think that contributed to his death.

The coroner reserved his decision.

- The Gisborne Herald
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#26 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 19 June 2014 - 05:53 PM

It's overdue that our rural community members were better served than than currently are when one reads through the above two cases and others out there.

They are not helped by the fact that they have had so many rural local hospitals closed over the years.

These people pay very high http://www.acc.co.nz levies that contribute to these essential services and should be receiving much better services.

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Posted 26 June 2014 - 02:56 PM

Man's hands crushed in hay feeder

NEIL RATLEY

Last updated 14:45 19/06/2014

http://www.stuff.co....d-in-hay-feeder

It took a bit of Kiwi ingenuity from rural firefighters to free a man who got his hands trapped in a hay feeder today.

The man suffered serious injuries to both hands after they were crushed while he was working on the rural Southland property this morning.

Emergency services rushed to the scene, near Waikaia, just after 9am.

Waikaia chief fire officer Ross Sage said his crew and a crew from Lumsden arrived just after an ambulance.

A man had both his hands trapped in the hay feeder and paramedics had hurried to treat his pain, Sage said.

However, when fire crews tried to free the man they ran into problems. The Lumsden crew had arrived with their cutting gear but the jaws of life weren’t believed strong enough to slice through the thick metal pipes on the feeder, Sage said.

"They are good for cars at a crash but it’s a different matter with two-inch metal pipes."

Lumsden firefighter Rob Scott said a similar hay feeder in the same paddock proved invaluable to the extraction efforts.

"We went and studied the other feeder to find a way to free the bloke," Scott said.

When a possibility was found, the Lumsden crew ripped off the balage that sat in the way and got to work.

"We decided we could use the hydraulic ram to pry the parts that had crushed his hands apart and get him out," Scott said.

Both Scott and Sage said it was not clear how the man got his hands trapped and that volunteer firefighters often had to think on their feet.

The man was flown to Dunedin Hospital with serious hand injuries.

However, Scott said he was a tough character: "He still managed to keep a sense of humour and make a few hand jokes during his ordeal".

Police said WorkSafe New Zealand had been told about the incident.


- The Southland Times
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#28 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 05:18 PM

Legal issues thought-provoking

Home » News » Farming
Fri, 27 Jun 2014
News: Farming


http://www.odt.co.nz...ought-provoking

''The law is an ass,'' declared a member of the audience at the Rural Women New Zealand midwinter seminar in Fairlie.

Her comment was among the plentiful feedback for speakers at the 17th annual seminar organised by South Canterbury RWNZ. The event has become renowned for presenting high-calibre speakers on topical subjects.

Dozens of women gathered at the Mackenzie Community Centre on June 19 to hear about ''Women and the law''.

South Canterbury RWNZ president Margaret Chapman
said it was 14 years since a law seminar was held, and the subject was frequently requested by attendees when asked for ideas.

The morning speakers were RSM Law representatives Julia Traylor, Jan Birt and Greta Keenan, updating topics including succession planning, trusts, wills, enduring powers of attorney, gifting, residential care subsidies, relationship property, and custody and day-to-day child care after a relationship split.

The audience asked many questions about farm ownership and succession, seeking detailed information about how trusts operated.

Ms Traylor
emphasised the importance of having an up-to-date will that was correctly signed and witnessed. It automatically revoked any previous will.

Gifting funds to family members and its effect on means testing for residential care subsidies was a complex subject that also drew plenty of questions and comments.

Ms Birt said there were 30,000 New Zealanders in long-term residential care. If people knew when they would need to go into care, it would be easier to plan when to gift funds; but because most had little idea in advance, it could be difficult to ensure they were eligible for the subsidy.

The thresholds were adjusted on July 1 each year, based on the Consumer Price Index.

''You need to be vigilant - watch what you give away,'' Ms Birt said.

''You can't be seen to be depriving yourself of assets or income that would have been able to go towards your care, and therefore put yourself at advantage over others needing care.''

Ms Keenan
outlined the issues of child care for couples who had separated, saying 90% worked out their own arrangements without court intervention.

The court was ''quite supportive'' of grandparents and others who wanted to maintain contact with the children, she said.

The parent with day-to-day care must consult with the other parent on issues such as the child's name, place of residence, medical treatment, education, religion, culture and language.

The Christchurch earthquakes caused major problems with places of residence, Ms Keenan said, but the most common reasons for relocation were employment and family.

When it came to dividing property after a relationship split, debt was now included, along with contributions to Kiwisaver. The latter ''can be a big issue'', Ms Keenan said.

The afternoon speaker, University of Otago law lecturer Simon Connell, explained a fairly recent shift in how the court interpreted contracts. In the past it had been very literal, along the lines of the famous ''pound of flesh'' debate in Shakespeare's play The Merchant of Venice.

Now, it tended to ''give the contract a meaning that has commercial sense'', Mr Connell said. That was on the basis that most parties would reach deals that were mutually beneficial, not very one-sided.

He then discussed the idea that pregnancy could be considered an accident, with the pregnant woman eligible to claim compensation under ACC. The cases that had gone to court related to failed sterilisation operations.

Mrs Chapman concluded the day by saying the seminar had served its purpose: ''to inform, to challenge, to entertain''.

- Sally Brooker
Courier Country
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Posted 15 July 2014 - 01:31 PM

Turning Farmers into general managers produces health & safety gains

http://www.emagcloud...index.html#/10/


Farmers encouraged to sow safety seeds
http://www.emagcloud...index.html#/12/

Big changes coming for farm owners & workers

http://www.emagcloud...index.html#/22/
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#30 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 29 September 2014 - 04:52 PM

The farming community have every reason to be concerned as they often take the blame for accidents due to those they get lumped with having to employ & that in turn increases there ACC levies unjustly.

Rural Contractors want action from the incoming Government
Wednesday, 24 September 2014, 9:44 am
Press Release: Rural Contractors NZ

Rural Contractors want action from the incoming Government

http://www.scoop.co....-government.htm

Rural Contractors New Zealand has congratulated Prime Minister John Key and the National Party for its success in this year’s general election.

RCNZ President Steve Levet says a clear-cut result is good for both the country and our economy, but the rural contracting sector would now like to see some action from the new government in a couple of key areas .

“There is no doubt the agriculture sector is an important and valuable part of New Zealand’s economy – and rural contracting is a vital and important component of that,” he explains.

“However, as RCNZ has been saying for some time, we really need some changes in the rules around migrant workers in the rural contracting sector – as there is a huge gap between rural contractors’ needs for trained, agricultural machinery operators and unemployed New Zealanders who can do this work.”

Mr Levet says the rules around employing temporary, skilled people from overseas prepared to work for 6-8 months each year must be simplified – as do the regulations restricting people who have previously worked here in past seasons coming back to New Zealand to work.

“Contracting is a seasonal business and one that uses sophisticated machinery that requires technical skill to operate productively,” he explains. “Part of this shortfall is met by bringing in skilled operators from overseas.”

Mr Levet is urging the new Government to seriously look at these regulations and how the process can be streamlined and simplified.

He adds that RCNZ is also keen to work with opposition political parties to help them better understand the needs and issues of the rural contracting sector.

“It is clear from some of the debate we heard during the election campaign that many parties are not aware of the dire shortage of suitable agricultural machinery operators,” Mr Levet explains. “It is apparent many politicians are completely ignorant about this problem and how rural contractors actually rely on employing skilled people from overseas on a temporary basis each season and have done so for many years.”

Mr Levet also points out that many of the applicants Work and Income NZ (WINZ) tries to fill these vacancies with; either do not have the right skill-set and/or attitude to be successful.


“We are talking about operating highly technical and very expensive pieces machinery. It is unrealistic, unsafe and impractical to expect unemployed people to walk off the street and successfully take up these positions.”

Mr Levet says his organisation will continue to work closely with the new Government, opposition political parties and officials too both ensure that locals have the best opportunity for employment in the sector – as well as continuing to lobby for changes to the rules around engaging overseas seasonal workers for the benefit of the rural contracting sector.

Meanwhile, RCNZ has also backed the calls from Federated Farmers for RMA reforms, which were proposed by National during the election campaign.

“The entire rural sector is keen for progress in the area of the Resource Management Act,” Mr Levet adds. “RCNZ backs RMA reform and would like to see action on this front as well.”

He says a strong and vibrant agricultural industry – including the rural contracting sector – is crucial to the ongoing success of New Zealand’s economy and changes to the RMA will enhance this success.

[Ends]


© Scoop Media
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Posted 16 October 2014 - 01:58 PM

Most ACC injury claims from agriculture, forestry and fishery workers
12:55 PM Wednesday Oct 15, 2014

http://www.nzherald....jectid=11342820

Nearly a quarter of agriculture, forestry, and fishery workers had a work-related injury claim accepted by the Accident Compensation Corporation last year, Statistics New Zealand says.

"Agriculture, forestry, and fishery workers had the highest rate of injury claims," Statistics customer, policy, and research manager Michele Lloyd said.

Provisional figures for last year showed that agriculture, forestry, and fishery workers made 226 injury claims per 1000 full-time equivalent employees (FTEs), and 2.6 per cent of those workers experienced an injury that resulted in a week or more off work.

The overall rate of injury claims was 92 claims for every 1000 full time equivalent employees (FTEs).

Last year, ACC approved 182,900 claims for injuries incurred while working.

"Men are more prone to workplace accidents, with male workers generating 73 per cent of all claims and 95 per cent of all claims for workplace fatal claims," Ms Lloyd said.

Age was also a factor, with the highest rates of injury claims coming from workers aged between 15 and 24 and those over the age of 65.

The figures also revealed that self-employed workers were almost twice as likely to experience workplace injuries than employees, Ms Lloyd said.

Pacific people had the highest claim rate (104 claims per 1000 FTEs), followed by Maori (93), European (88), and Asian workers (52).

The regional picture placed Northland with the highest incidence rate - 130 claims per 1000 FTEs - followed closely by Gisborne/Hawkes Bay with 127, and Bay of Plenty with 125 claims.

Green Party industrial relations spokeswoman Denise Roche said the Government must commit more resources immediately to help reduce injuries in at-risk industries.

"Workers in these industries are often de-unionised and have to work all hours in variable weather.

"There are currently no regulations preventing work in poor weather for these high risk occupations," she said.

"While New Zealand continues to avoid putting in place regulations around such basic safety measures, workers in these industries will continue to be killed and injured."

WorkSafe New Zealand needed to start pushing for reforms that made a difference to the country's poor health and safety record for workers, Ms Roche said.

Other occupation groups with high rates of work-related injury claims last year were:

• trades workers - 187 per 1000 FTEs

• elementary occupations - 161 per 1000 FTEs

• plant and machine operators and assemblers - 158 per 1000 FTEs

Trends from final data for 2002-12 show that:

• the incidence rate has fallen each year since 2002 (from 129 claims per 1000 FTEs in 2002 to 92 in 2012)

• since 2002, the incidence rate has been consistently higher for self-employed workers than for employees. In 2012, the incidence rate was 85 claims per 1000 FTEs for employees compared with 147 for self-employed people

• agriculture and fishery workers have consistently had the highest claim rate since 2002

- APNZ


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#32 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 16 October 2014 - 01:59 PM

Injuries at work show some sectors too dangerous - CTU

http://www.voxy.co.n...us-ctu/5/204797

Wednesday, 15 October, 2014 - 14:33

Workers are deeply concerned about the research Statistics New Zealand have released today showing that almost one-quarter of agriculture, forestry, and fishery workers had a work-related injury claim accepted by the Accident Compensation Corporation (ACC) in 2013.

Provisional figures for 2013 show that agriculture, forestry, and fishery workers made 226 injury claims per 1,000 full-time equivalent employees (FTEs), and 2.6 percent of these workers experienced an injury that resulted in a week or more off work.

"Clearly workers in these areas are over represented. There is something seriously and systemically wrong when a quarter of workforce in any particular sector are injured at work." CTU President Helen Kelly said today.

"There seems to be an acceptance that there are some sectors where a certain number of injuries, or even fatalities are expected. This is an unacceptable perspective. Every worker should be able to return home from work safety." Kelly said.

"The thing all three of these sectors have in common is workers have no viable form of independent representation including through unions and the current employment law makes collectivising across these types of businesses extremely difficult. The industries are then characterised by poor working conditions, high turnover, and a lack of investment in training and long hours. Instead of dealing with this reality, the Government intends to attack workers’ rights and in this environment, we can expect these disastrous statistics to be repeated next year." Kelly said.
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Posted 25 November 2014 - 03:38 PM

When viewed in context, the farming & related industries pay a vast amount to http://www.acc.co.nz, yet the total cost of active claims in the Bay of Plenty in 2013 was $553,000.

We would be most interested to know how much these farmers pay in Levies per year to ensure transparency and where all the levies are going to.


Nearly crushed to death

By Catherine Gaffaney, Anita Moran
7:27 AM Tuesday Nov 18, 2014 comment

http://www.nzherald....jectid=11360260

After a serious accident, Jack van Silfhout is calling on farmers to stop thinking they are indestructible and to take more care, especially with machinery. Photo / Andrew Warner

Jack van Silfhout thought he was "a goner" as he lay in a paddock, unable to move after being crushed by his tractor.

Mr van Silfhout's injuries included a crushed pelvis, broken nose, broken eye socket and crushed ribs.

The Welcome Bay farmer has spent the past five months recovering from his injuries and has called for farmers to stop thinking they are indestructible.

His comments come as figures showed more than 2000 farming-related injuries were reported in the Western Bay of Plenty from 2011 to 2013 - costing more than $1.5 million in compensation.

Mr van Silfhout, whose accident happened in April, was lucky the tractor had landed off him and he was not trapped. He managed to reach his cellphone and call his son. Mr van Silfhout has had more than 30 years experience working with large machinery and had celebrated his 71st birthday two days earlier. "Farmers need to be more conscious of the machinery they're using, because if you make a mistake, you're finished. I shouldn't have used the tractor I did because it didn't have a safety frame ..."

According to ACC, claim numbers in the Bay rose year-on-year to 378 new claims and 503 active claims in 2013. The figures included injuries to workers on sheep, beef, dairy cattle, poultry and other livestock farms, as well as those involved in fruit, vegetable, grain, plant and crop growing.

The total cost of active claims was also highest in 2013 at $553,000.

Federated Farmers Bay of Plenty president Rick Powdrell said the rising numbers were concerning, though he thought more people might be lodging claims where they would have previously shaken an injury off.

"There's a real concentration on safety now so people are really aware of the need to be safe and report incidents ..."

Nationally, the number of new ACC claims for farming injuries was highest in 2012 - up 2745 year-on-year to 20,565. In 2013, the number of new claims dropped slightly to 20,417.

Active claims followed a similar pattern, up by 2548 to 31,286 in 2013, and down slightly to 31,233 in 2014.

- Bay of Plenty Times
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#34 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 25 November 2014 - 04:05 PM

$18m profit for rural women from sale
Last updated 09:38, November 24 2014

http://www.stuff.co....women-from-sale

Rural Women NZ has picked up a windfall $18 million from the sale of its shares in Access Homehealth, a not-for-profit home healthcare services company, to Green Cross Health.

Rural Women will gain representation on the Green Cross board as part of the deal and no staff will lose their jobs.


Access Homehealth,
which evolved from the bush nurse and housekeeping schemes, was set up in the mid-1920s by members of the Women's Division of the Farmers Union.

It is now one of the largest providers of homecare services in the country, contracted to DHBs, the Ministry of Health and ACC and has annual sales of $85m.


Green Cross was formerly known as PharmacyBrands and is the owner of the Life Pharmacy and Unichem chains.

The purchase is conditional and Green Cross said it was satisfied a number of conditions would be met over the next two weeks and that the deal would be completed by December 1.

Rural Women said that in considering the offer it looked at whether Access remained a core service.

"Could we make better use of the capital for the benefit of our members and the wider rural community? We believe so."
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#35 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 22 December 2014 - 04:00 PM

Sadly we don't believe that wearing a seat belt on a tractor will make make difference as there is not the same protections around one as say a car or truck.

Coroner calls for lap-belts in tractors
6:11 PM Monday Dec 15, 2014

http://www.nzherald....jectid=11374584

A coroner is calling for greater awareness about the importance of farmers using lap-belts in tractors, after two incidents where men died after being thrown from tractors.

Coroner Richard McElrea has released his findings in to the deaths of Stewart Bath and George Lewis Williams, who both died after their tractors crashed on farms.

Mr Bath, 59, died in an accident on his Roxburgh farm in Central Otago on November 22, 2012.

He was driving a tractor with a trailer attached down steep terrain when the tractor rolled.
Mr Bath was thrown from the tractor and died from his injuries at the scene.

Then on February 18 last year, George Lewis Williams, 62, died when he was thrown from his tractor as he navigated the tractor and a trailer down a steep hill.

The tractor vaulted over a small gully and Mr Williams was ejected from his seat and killed.

Coroner McElrea said in both instances, the men were not wearing the lap-belts fitted in their tractors.

He said if Mr Williams had been wearing the lap-belt he may have been better able to control the tractor as it came down the steep bank.

Coroner McElrea recommended WorkSafe New Zealand highlight the importance of wearing a lap-belt while operating a tractor to the relevant sectors.


- NZME.

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#36 User is offline   unit1of2 

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Posted 04 January 2015 - 04:15 PM

What a stupid suggestion of putting anyone in a seat belt on a tractor... (My understanding is that the judge is referring to open saddle seat type tractors?) One would be crushed to death before having the reaction to release one's seatbelt. Best have the option of jumping off and/or hoping to survive being thrown.

Tractors are not the issue here.... IT IS THE OPERATORS of these dam things. Just like the Quad Bikes, Cars, Mopeds, Cycles, skates etc etc etc.... operator errors... dah!
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#37 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 13 April 2015 - 01:04 PM

New farm rules feared in Northland

By Imran Ali
10:00 AM Wednesday Apr 8, 2015 comments

http://www.nzherald....jectid=11429300

A Northland farming leader has warned new safety measures demanded by WorkSafe and the level of fines for breaches could force small scale farmers out of business and close farms to public access.

Roger Ludbrook, president of the Federated Farmers' in Northland, has called on WorkSafe to clearly define what it meant by "taking all practicable steps to minimise accidents" as the term was the death kneel for all employers. He described the term as "limitless" which gave the Government entity the licence to prosecute businesses while failing to take into account the fact that accidents could not be entirely prevented.

The decision to prosecute the Ministry of Social Development for its failure to take all practicable steps to ensure the safety of its two employees in Ashburton who were shot dead by a gunman was a case in point, he said.

But WorkSafe NZ has defended the new programme - Safer Farms which was launched in February - saying it was because of an increase in deaths and injuries on farms.

The Government safety body said Safer Farms provides simple resources for setting up health and safety systems on-farm.

"Safer Farms has been developed with industry input and is about working with farmers and rural communities to take ownership of health and safety on farms, and develop practical solutions," Al McCone, WorkSafe NZ agriculture programme manager said.

"It will support farmers to manage their safety performance, build farm safety leadership and maintain regulatory pressure."

However, this hasn't satisfied Mr Ludbrook.

"Take all practical steps, farmers cannot ensure at any time the safety of their staff to the level currently being demanded by Worksafe NZ, if the MSD prosecution is the example of failure," he said.

Mr Ludbrook said to ensure the safety of all visitors on farms, farmers may not allow public access to their properties after citing health and safety reasons.

"If there is an accident and you have not recorded their visit, signed them onto the farm, advised them of all potential on farm hazards, signed away your liability and sighted any required gun licence, you will be liable under health and safety NZ for any injury or death that may occur while on farm," he said.

"Worksafe NZ is threatening our way of life, they hold the moral high ground around safety ... Farmers must push back against Worksafe NZ and how these new laws are being interpreted. Perhaps the closure of our farms to public access may be the catalyst to make Worksafe NZ start listening to our concerns about another government department gone mad with power."

Maximum fines of $250,000 to businesses for breaches to health and safety regulations could force the sale of small farms that were prosecuted, he said.

"This (farming) is a dangerous business.

"We don't go out every morning wanting to have an accident and I think what exactly constitutes practicable steps needs to be clearly spelt out," Mr Ludbrook said.

Mr McCone said more people were killed in farming than in any other work-related activity and in the past two years there have been 41 work-related deaths on farms. He said people were not just dying but getting seriously hurt, which affected farmers and their families for life.

"ACC received 32,000 injury claims in 2013 from farm workers. Farmers face a tough enough time without the loss of productivity and the financial impacts that go with it. Things have to change,"
he said.

Mr McCone said WorkSafe looked at the problem and sat down with farmers, sector groups and other stakeholders to discuss the issue while ensuring the success of the agriculture sector.

People who wished to enter farms did not need to sign in and out, but he said it was good practice if they did.

-More than 9000 farming injuries were reported to ACC in Northland from 2011 to 2013 - costing the national accident compensation scheme more than $9 million.

- Northern Advocate

By Imran Ali

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#38 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 16 July 2015 - 12:58 PM

Suicide alert over farm stress

By Alexandra Newlove
11:00 AM Thursday Jul 16, 2015 comments

http://www.nzherald....jectid=11481822

A bleak winter is in store for dairy farmers with milk payouts almost half what they were at the start of last year.

Industry experts are urging farmers to seek help if they are not coping.

Whangarei farmer and district councillor Greg Martin said he knew of one suspected suicide related to farming stress.

Dairy prices fell to a six-year low earlier this month following the latest GlobalDairyTrade auction, paced by whole milk powder, the nation's key export commodity.

Northland Rural Support Trust co-ordinator Julie Jonker said the situation was compounded in Northland, where farmers had endured four droughts in the past six years and severe flooding in July last year.

"Imagine - during the drought in 2013 the average Northland dairy farmer lost $100,000 without the payout being half of what it once was," Ms Jonker said.

Fonterra's forecast payout had dropped from $8.75 per kilogram of milk solids in February 2014 to $4.60 in May this year.

"I don't think people realise just what an effect this will have," Ms Jonker said.

"Sooner or later it will have a flow-on effect to Auckland and then the Government will sit up and take notice."

It was not just farmers but also suppliers, contractors and rural communities feeling the pinch.

"We are trying to ensure there are people in place that talk to farmers and help them see there's a way forward," she said.

There were just over 1000 dairy farmers in Northland.

Whangarei District Councillor Greg Martin farms at Ruatangata West and had been counselling several local farmers through tough financial and emotional times.

"A lot of people, when prices were going up, bought the farm next door or expanded so debt went up," he said.

He said the issue of farmers' mental health was still often skirted around.

"Mostly that's kept pretty quiet. There's been a suicide in Northland recently but it's kept quiet.

"Farmers need to identify anyone they think might be under too much stress. Sometimes it's relatively easy to fix with good advice, management, some assistance and a bit of a break."

Federated Farmers dairy industry group chairman Andrew Hoggard said most farmers had not felt the dropping cashflow effects until the start of this year due to "top up" carry over payments from the high payout 2013/2014 season.

"The pain didn't start setting in until earlier this year," he said.

"The toughest time is going to be this winter."

-Call 0800 787 254 for support or: northland.rural-support.org.nz


Where to get help:
• Lifeline: 0800 543 354 (available 24/7)
• Suicide Crisis Helpline: 0508 828 865 (0508 TAUTOKO) (available 24/7)
• Youth services: (06) 3555 906
• Youthline: 0800 376 633
• Kidsline: 0800 543 754 (4pm to 6pm weekdays)
• Whatsup: 0800 942 8787 (1pm to 11pm)
• The Word
• Depression helpline: 0800 111 757 (available 24/7)
• Rainbow Youth: (09) 376 4155
• CASPER Suicide Prevention
If it is an emergency and you feel like you or someone else is at risk, call 111.

- Northern Advocate

By Alexandra Newlove

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Farma

"Now is the time for the banks to step up and support our farmers. The drop in payout is totally out off he farmers control, something the banks seem to ignore. These commodity fluctuations are nothing new and we will come through this. The banks need to think longer term and keep their clients,which in turn will keep our rural communities, which in turn will keep the cities and urban areas in the black. Stay strong, seek help, keep friends close. We will get through this."

Agree Brother,
However, its not the banks that are the main problem.The Astute farmer/business person should have cultured a good relationship with their bank manager and keep them in the loop in good times and bad.
The more biggest challenge is IRD and ACC who blindly look at your accounts from last season and therefore set your ACC charges and Provisional taxes based on that last high payout year.
Now outsiders are going to say well you can save money from the good year blah blah blah and we do.......but that only goes so far - this paticular decline in Milk price has been falling for over a year already - how much reserves can any business have?
As they say, what doesn't kill you makes you stronger!
Red - 12:30 PM Thursday, 16 Jul 2015

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#39 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 21 August 2015 - 05:20 PM

Please click on the link to read the figures mentioned.

Minister, WorkSafe at odds on farm safety

Updated at 3:03 pm today

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Benedict Collins, Rural News - [email protected]

Workplace Relations and Safety Minister Michael Woodhouse's decision to classify sheep, beef and dairy farming as low-risk in terms of health and safety flies in the face of advice from WorkSafe NZ.


http://www.radionz.c...-on-farm-safety

Under the Government's Health and Safety Reform Bill, any workplace that falls into the high-risk category will be required to have a health and safety officer - but Mr Woodhouse has controversially classified sheep, beef and dairy farms as low-risk.
Caucus run 21/07/15

Workplace Relations and Safety Minister Michael Woodhouse

Photo: RNZ / Alexander Robertson

But WorkSafe New Zealand told Mr Woodhouse in a briefing in October 2014 that agriculture was the worst performing industry in the country in terms of health and safety - with 20 deaths in 2013, more than forestry, construction and manufacturing combined.

Mr Woodhouse was also told the dairy, beef and sheep industries were the most dangerous sectors of all, with the highest accident and fatality tolls within agriculture.

The Government estimates 130 New Zealanders will be severely injured on dairy farms this August alone, as calving takes place.

But Mr Woodhouse has defended the decision to classify dairy, sheep and beef farming as low-risk.

"Look, all I can do is let the facts guide me," Mr Woodhouse said.

"The facts are, when adjusted for the size of the industry, while there are a lot of injuries in farming, they fell below the threshold and below many others that are quite risky," Mr Woodhouse said.

In the last seven years, ACC has received more than 53,000 injury claims resulting from work accidents on dairy farms - more than 7000 of those workers were injured severely.

There are just over 12,000 dairy farms in New Zealand.
Dairy workplace injuries: ACC claims - by injury severity and month (2008-2015)

Dairy workplace injuries: ACC claims - by injury severity and month (2008-2015)

Photo: SUPPLIED
Dairy workplace injuries: ACC claims - top five injuries by month (2008-2015)

Dairy workplace injuries: ACC claims - top five injuries by month (2008-2015)

Photo: SUPPLIED
Dairy workplace injuries: ACC claims - top five causes by month (2008-2015)

Dairy workplace injuries: ACC claims - top five causes by month (2008-2015)

Photo: SUPPLIED

The Labour Party's workplace relations and safety spokesperson, Sue Moroney,
said it was farcical that the Government was classifying the country's most dangerous industries as low-risk - while classifying industries such as worm farming as high-risk.

"It's no surprise, everyone knows of the dangers that are inherent in the agricultural sector and that dairy and beef farming are one of the main contributors to that," Ms Moroney said.

Ms Moroney said Mr Woodhouse had been forced to exclude dairy, sheep and beef farming from the high-risk category because of pressure from the farming community.

The Government's decision to classify dairy farming as low-risk comes as Worksafe New Zealand is running a campaign warning that 1000 dairy farm workers will be injured this month, when calving takes place - 130 severely.

Related

Farming sector 'needs to stand up' over safety
Govt left wriggling over safety bill
Farmers applaud Govt safety move
Health and safety 'by farmers for farmers'
Safer Farms launched today

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#40 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 21 August 2015 - 05:21 PM

Farming sector 'needs to stand up' over safety

Updated at 8:54 am today

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Labour Party leader Andrew Little is calling on the farming sector to improve workplace safety despite being largely excluded from new health and safety legislation.

http://www.radionz.c...%27-over-safety

104 people have been killed in the sector since 2010, more than a third of all work-place fatalities in New Zealand over the same period.

Under new health and safety legislation, currently before Parliament, most farms will be exempt from having to designate a staff member as a health and safety representative.

Mr Little said the Government was not doing enough to protect the safety of farm workers.

He called on farmers to take the lead in improving farm safety.

"We actually need the farming community, responsible farmers, to stand up and say, 'we can do better, we will take responsibility, we don't want any exclusions and exceptions in the law and we will do what is right to improve New Zealand's health and safety record'.

"That responsibility sits as much with the farming community as it does with our political leaders."

Federated Farmers health and safety spokesperson Katie Milne
said better farm safety would be achieved by analysing accident data held by Work Safe and ACC.

She hoped this would help to identify trends.

"For example, for six out of the last 10 people who went to hospital who were crushed by an animal (maybe) it happened between 11 and 12 o'clock.

"Then we could say, look guys, you obviously need to have a break somewhere in there, or you're looking past the job you're doing and thinking about your lunch break.

"Changing the culture comes from being able to point out to farmers where their highest risk is, not just that there are a lot of injuries because of quad bikes, but what is the factor behind it. That is the key to cracking the nut of this high injury and death rate that we've got."

Related

Government's farming safety move 'a disgrace'
Farmers applaud Govt safety move
Govt left wriggling over safety bill
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