ACCforum: Collins apologises to TV journalist - ACCforum

Jump to content

  • 3 Pages +
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

Collins apologises to TV journalist

#41 User is offline   BLURB 

  • accforum.nz
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 5774
  • Joined: 22-July 06
  • LocationCambridge

Posted 08 May 2014 - 01:01 PM

Collins show exposes selective hearing
JANE CLIFTON
Last updated 05:00 08/05/2014

OPINION: It was not David Cunliffe's most convincing performance when, after listing with evangelical relish National's growing list of donation controversies yesterday, he added in Eeyore-ish tones: "It gives us no pleasure!"

On the contrary, it was clear the Labour leader had discovered a new form of legal high. The Opposition has not had this much fun in months - one minister down, another on the ropes and a whole new "cash-for-access" furore to monster the Government with - which was why Cunliffe took the first Opposition call in Parliament's general debate.

There was also the need to try to deflect the debate away from Labour's own fundraising, for political party donation scandals are an equal-opportunity muck-rake.

National may be in the frame for Oravida, Donghua Liu and the Cabinet clubs, through which donors pay to socialise with ministers. But Labour too, as Prime Minister John Key pointed out, was pretty good on after-sales service for its donors.

Those businesses and charities that paid $1250 to pitch stalls in the foyer of the last Labour Party conference got to have chats with senior party figures of their choice. Retiring MP Shane Jones accepted donations from the oil and gas industry for his party leadership campaign, then spoke in favour of the sector's mining and exploration. MP Trevor Mallard delivered a speech to a paying audience at a party fundraiser.

And as for Greens co-leader Russel Norman, who railed against the democratic affront of moneyed National donors getting preferential access to ministers, "he needs to realise that his high horse went lame when he hitched it up at the Dotcom mansion", Key said, savouring the pre-polished one-liner as his troops laughed and cheered.

"The laughter of the damned," declaimed Cunliffe. He too had been at the metaphor cupboard, referring to Oravida's controversial harvesting of swamp kauri for export, saying Judith Collins "wants to drain every swamp but her own".

Why, he said, did Key not end the misery surrounding his embattled justice minister and "let her go".

This was an odd choice of phrase, as there is no way Collins is being held in the Cabinet against her will nor would she simply drift off humbly if "let go".

On the contrary, Key had to force her into taking stress leave for a fortnight by announcing this hiatus to the nation in case she would not "let go" - preferring, as she obviously had done, to fight on, incidentally sucking up all the political oxygen in the run-up to the Budget.

However, the traditional cone of silence that falls over MPs when they are put on gardening leave had descended on Collins. The Opposition, realising they would get little further change out of her, concentrated its attack on Key, while Collins gave scant sign of listening to a word said about her.

It would be surprising, though, if she did not register with amusement the irony that, asked thunderous questions about various cash-for-access donors and donations, Key kept saying he could not remember the details. This was hardly an advertisement for future donors to National: pay big bucks to earbash the PM, and he is sure to forget every word you said.

- © Fairfax NZ News

http://www.stuff.co....lective-hearing
0

#42 User is offline   not their victim 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 10829
  • Joined: 04-August 08

Posted 09 May 2014 - 11:01 AM


Toby Manhire is a Wellington-bred, Auckland-based journalist.

Toby Manhire: Advice for tweeting MPs
4:15 AM Friday May 9, 20141 commentPosted ImageJustice Minister Judith Collins. Photo / Getty ImagesIt's a jungle out there. As acclaimed media analyst and Prime Minister John Key has noted, the modern politician confronts not just the workaday knuckleheads of the mainstream media but a blizzard of blogsters, some of whom need to be regularly telephoned, as well as the trolls and bottom-feeders of social media.

This final category of sewer rats was codified by the PM this week after the embattled Judith Collins' brain exploded all over Twitter, goading TV3 into covering a bizarre attack on TVNZ's Katie Bradford. After a tweeted apology on Sunday, Collins was gone, dispatched to social-media Siberia.

Already I miss @judithcollinsmp: her bull-headedness, her wit, her incandescent double standards. She tweeted too close to the sun, however. It was always going to go up in flames. Drawing on her experience, and those of other politicians, I humbly offer 10 bits of advice for MPs on Twitter.

1. Don't feed the trolls (or troll the bottom-feeders)

The Prime Minister is right. They "get in people's head". The trick is to ignore them, rather than following Collins' Mad Max-style example. Bernard Shaw said it: Never wrestle with a pig. You end up covered in filth, and the pig loves it.

2. Engage

If you're making up numbers on the backbench, engage away. Hardly anyone is watching, so you can howl and blather all day long. See also, "@TauHenare".

Now that Maurice Williamson is unburdened by ministerial warrants, let's hope he ramps up the impudent tweeting. He's good at it. About a year ago, still basking in gay rainbow celebrity, the Pakuranga highwayman noticed a series of tweets from Henare detailing gym activity, such as: "WOD '300' 25min Cap / 25 Pull Ups (kips) / 50 D/L 40kg / 50 push-ups / 50 Box jumps 16 inch / 50 Box jumps 16 inch / 50 Flr Wipes." Williamson's reply: "Meanwhile in Emirates First Class Lounge in Dubai I did: 20 G&Ts 14 SavBlancs 6 BlackRussians 7 tequilas and 4 pints of lager."

3. Don't engage

After Collins blew a gasket on Sunday, Key advised politicians to use Twitter "as a broadcast medium". Such a suggestion will be blasphemy to New Zealand's several thousand social media experts, but he's right. If you're a senior politician, err on the side of non-engagement. Unless you're completely confident and proficient at it, just don't.

It is true that John Key's Twitter account is about as entertaining as lint (he has produced only two interesting tweets, the one-word "Bugger" after the America's Cup catastrophe, and an upside-down photograph of a supermarket) but that's how he likes it.

Consider a rare prime ministerial foray into engagement. When he tweeted something about economic growth being important, followed by: "What do you think?" the responses flooded in. "I also think that the weather is very important, what do you think?" said one. Another: "I think the children are our future. What do you think?" Then: "I am afraid of my inevitable decay and mortality. What do you think?" And: "Nice tie."

4. Be yourself

It is hard not to like @TauHenare. He takes a joke. As with @judithcollinsmp, not for a second could you imagine their tweets are posted by a staffer. Even if you're not a prolific tweeter, from time to time you should provide evidence of being a human.

Ed Balls, the British Labour Party finance guy, has his own chapter in the history of political Twitter. In 2011, he poetically posted, simply, "Ed Balls". He'd meant to search for his name, rather than publish, and "didn't realise" he was able to delete it. Now, April 28 is Ed Balls Day, when thousands of people mark the anniversary by tweeting (or retweeting) "Ed Balls". Both the Guardian and the Mirror - I'm not kidding - have live-blogged the occasion. To his credit, Balls joins in, too.

5. Don't be yourself

It's a public forum. You're a politician. You're not normal. Don't be yourself. As with all the other rules, this does not apply to Tau Henare.

6. Don't drink and tweet

Not even from your second Twitter account hilariously parodying a political rival.

7. No Weiners

In 2011, US congressman Anthony Weiner used Twitter to share with a 21-year-old woman an intimate selfie. This sort of thing has become de rigueur among New Zealand sportspeople of late, and that's bad enough, but among politicians it is a cardinal sin. Democracy cannot function if we think even fleetingly about our elected representatives' bits.

8. No selfies

Even the non-smutty ones have had their day. See also, "derp face".

9. Do not read lists of advice about using Twitter

10. If you're going to be a patronising arse, double-check the spelling.

My favourite political tweet of all time? From June last year, posted by British Conservative MP Andrew Selous: "Strongly support the loss of benefits unless claimants lean English."

- NZ Herald


0

#43 User is offline   BLURB 

  • accforum.nz
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 5774
  • Joined: 22-July 06
  • LocationCambridge

Posted 09 May 2014 - 11:13 AM

Cabinet Club claims 'envy', says Henare
STACEY KIRK]
Last updated 09:07 09/05/2014

Opposition attacks on National Party fundraisers, where individuals can pay for access to ministers, is Labour Party envy National MP Tau Henare says.

Labour and NZ First widened their attacks on the Government yesterday and claimed to have proof Prime Minister John Key was involved in talks to ease citizenship restrictions for wealthy foreign investors.

The allegations come out of reports on National Party events run throughout the country, called Cabinet Clubs.

But Henare said this morning that persistent allegations of cash-for-access being levelled at the Government by Opposition MPs were a deliberate tactic to even out the amount of donations between National and Labour.

"This is Labour Party envy about how people raise funds," he told Breakfast.

"Quite frankly what this says, is the National Party is a hell of a lot better at fundraising than these guys are, and that's where it comes from.

"This is a whole strategy.

"On Tuesday, they had the opportunity to come in with the smoking gun, with everything laid out for them, and what happened? The focus went on [Labour MP] Trevor [Mallard], because Trevor's up to his old tricks again."

In the House yesterday, Immigration Minister Michael Woodhouse fought off questions over a meeting he held with Donghua Liu, the Chinese businessmen at the centre of issues surrounding Maurice Williamson's resignation as minister last week.

NZ First leader Winston Peters questioned Woodhouse about Key's involvement in discussions and tabled letters written by developer Leigh Hopper which he said proved it.

The letters, written on behalf of the Construction Development Alliance to Key and the immigration minister of the time Nathan Guy in February and April 2012, profess to have Key's backing for changes to immigration laws.

Hopper wrote: "We look forward to building on the engagement that one of our members, Mr Donghua Liu ... had with the prime minister on this issue last year, in order to achieve a successful outcome in the near future."

In a second letter to Guy, Hopper said they had received "strong expressions of support" from Key.

But Hopper said he had not discussed the issue with Key personally, although members of the group had, and, although he was a party donor, he had never been granted preferential access.

The changes they sought, including an easing of language restrictions, were aimed at attracting more foreign investment but were never made, he said.

"My expectations and dealing and any conversations I've had with John Key in the past have been always squeaky clean," Hopper said.

"There's no way that John Key is ever going to infer that he'll grease the wheels for some money. Donghua Liu might ask ... that might be part of their Chinese culture, but it's not part of the New Zealand culture."

Liu was granted citizenship against official advice and donated $22,000 to the National Party.

Allegations against him of domestic violence led to the downfall of former building and construction minister Williamson, who phoned senior police about the case and resigned when the issue came to light.

Woodhouse told Parliament yesterday he knew of no such discussions between Key and members of the group but could go away and check, prompting criticism from Peters outside the House.

Labour MP Trevor Mallard found himself ejected from the House for a second time this week after asking if Woodhouse had ever been offered money by donors to the National Party who wanted influence.

Woodhouse said the accusations were "quite offensive really to suggest that that would even be offered, much less accepted".

Mallard, who was also on Breakfast today, said it was "increasingly clear" the policy debate was being driven through special access to ministers being granted to those who could afford it.

"The Cabinet Club is a very clear example of that," he said.

- Stuff

http://www.stuff.co....nvy-says-Henare


Is National MP Tau Henare attempting to get some free media attention by (jumping on the band wagon) getting involved at this time?
0

#44 User is offline   not their victim 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 10829
  • Joined: 04-August 08

Posted 09 May 2014 - 11:16 AM


Adam is a political reporter for the New Zealand Herald.

Collins shrugs off Labour attacks
6:57 AM Thursday Mar 20, 2014Justice Minister reveals she gave PM full account of China visit, including that she knew official would be at dinner.

Posted ImageJudith Collins insists Oravida business was not discussed at the dinner. Photo / NZ HeraldJustice Minister Judith Collins last night dismissed Labour claims that she had failed to tell Prime Minister John Key of further details about her dinner with a senior Chinese border control official last year.

Ms Collins last week apologised to Mr Key for not telling him sooner of the dinner she had in Beijing with her friends and Oravida bosses Stone Shi and Julia Xu, and the official.

Ms Collins told the PM of the dinner only after she came under pressure from the Opposition two weeks ago over claims of a conflict of interest in her meetings with Mr Shi and Ms Xu during the trip on justice portfolio business.

Ms Collins - whose husband, David Wong-Tung, is a director of milk exporter Oravida - also paid a visit to the company's Shanghai office, an event the firm used for promotional purposes.

While she has previously acknowledged that she was invited to the Beijing dinner before she left for China, yesterday she confirmed to Parliament that she also knew the border control official would be there and knew his name and position.

Labour MP Grant Robertson said it was beyond belief that Ms Collins thought meeting such a senior official with her husband's fellow directors did not give rise to a conflict of interest.

"John Key needs to reveal whether Judith Collins told him or his chief of staff this was a pre-planned dinner and that she knew the identity of the Chinese official before she left.

"If she didn't, she has surely used up the final warning the Prime Minister gave her," Mr Robertson said.

However, a spokeswoman from Ms Collins' office told the Herald that last week, the minister had given Mr Key's chief of staff, Wayne Eagleson, a full account of the visit, including the fact that she was aware before she left for China that the official would be at the dinner.

Speaking from Beijing, Mr Key said what Ms Collins had told him about the dinner was consistent with what she had said publicly in Parliament. He did not believe there was any further information that had not already been made public.

The month before Ms Collins' trip, Ms Xu said that Oravida was experiencing difficulties getting milk into China after the Fonterra botulism scare and that the New Zealand Government could do more to engage with Chinese officials to help.

However, Ms Collins has denied Oravida's business was discussed during the Beijing dinner.

Asked by NZ First Leader Winston Peters about her comment last week that Oravida wasn't experiencing any difficulties exporting milk to China, given Ms Xu's remarks, Ms Collins said: "What it does show is that I had very little knowledge of Oravida's business, and I should have had more."





Oravida expands into gold mining


Oravida has expanded its interests into gold mining.

Land records show the company spent $3.2 million buying land north of Auckland and on the South Island's West Coast about the time it began exporting milk in bulk to China.

Both chunks of land are used for dairy farming, although the West Coast land also has a prospecting licence registered in the name of Oravida director David Wong-Tung, Justice Minister Judith Collins' husband.

Mr Wong-Tung joined the company as a director in October 2011.

The appointment came around the time Oravida purchased land worth $1.9 million at Kaukapakapa, north of Auckland.

The dairy farm lines up with Oravida's desire to create its own milk supply chain, which dates back to interest in the Crafar farms in 2009.

The West Coast land, which stretches from the township of Ross up the Mikonui Valley, was bought in 2013.

The prospecting permit on it dates from November 2011, is held in Mr Wong-Tung's name, and authorises the company to search for gold, among other minerals.

Local resident Lynley Hargreaves - also an environmental campaigner - said she understood the company's interest was in mining the land and then using part of it for dairy.

Oravida's other commercial interests include swamp kauri products, honey, scampi and salmon.

It also intends to branch into beef, lamb and wine.

- NZ Herald


0

#45 User is offline   not their victim 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 10829
  • Joined: 04-August 08

Posted 09 May 2014 - 11:16 AM


Bleach victim says ACC report has ruined his career
By Peter de Graaf

6:00 AM Saturday Mar 15, 20141 commentPosted ImageBleach attack victim Mike Nager is still hopeful his assailants will held to account,The victim of a horrifying bleach attack says an inaccurate ACC report has wrecked his chances of returning to his job at the Northland Regional Council.

The report also contained confidential medical information that should not have been sent to his employer, he says. ACC has since re-written the report and apologised but the NRC is refusing to destroy all copies of the original.

Mike Nager was driving to Whangarei from his home near Kerikeri on June 10 last year when he pulled over for a car flashing its lights behind him, assuming something was wrong with his vehicle.

When he stopped, however, bleach was thrown into his eyes and his face slashed with a knife. His attacker then felled him with a punch to the chest and stole his cellphone and wallet.

Mr Nager had been due in court that morning as the key witness in an Environment Court hearing against two Far North men accused of illegally draining a wetland for swamp kauri.

He returned to work ten days later, after his eyesight returned, but started getting flashbacks when he was re-assigned the ute he was driving at the time of the attack. They were so vivid he could feel the stinging of the bleach and the blade cutting into his face. Mr Nager went on sick leave on October 15 and is now on ACC.

The 45-year-old believed he had been making good progress towards returning to his role as an environmental monitoring officer.

However, he said his employer's attitude changed dramatically on February 4 after ACC sent the council a Stay at Work report which he said was both inaccurate and contained confidential medical information.

ACC agreed it was inaccurate, produced an amended version and contacted the NRC requesting that any copies of the original report be destroyed. The council, however, has kept one copy for its lawyer.

Mr Nager said the NRC had seemed happy with his progress in getting back to work but that changed after the erroneous report.

He had been told his job could be terminated on medical grounds, and that the council was concerned about health and safety of other staff if he returned to his original role.

"It's had a serious impact on my employment. I'm concerned I won't get my job back. I love my job, it's been fantastic apart from that one incident. The places you go, the people you meet, that's what I love."

Mr Nager is now considering his career options. He has lodged a complaint with the Privacy Commissioner over ACC's release of information and the NRC's refusal to destroy it. He has an ACC advocate helping him and last week took his case against the NRC to the Employment Relations Authority.

"I can't believe I'm being treated this way. I didn't ask for this to happen, it's just so wrong."

ACC spokeswoman Stephanie Melville said Mr Nager's original Stay at Work report contained some inaccurate information.

"We have subsequently apologised and actively sought the return of the original report. An amended Stay at Work report, which Mr Nager is happy with, has been sent to his employer. They have agreed to return the original but have retained a copy.

"Mr Nager has lodged a complaint with the Office of the Privacy Commissioner who will be investigating."

The report, however, did not include any confidential medical information, Ms Melville said.

- NORTHERN ADVOCATE


0

#46 User is offline   not their victim 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 10829
  • Joined: 04-August 08

Posted 09 May 2014 - 11:20 AM

Oravida


swamps
scampi
kauri
salmon
lamb....

heres hoping the Privacy Commission is forthcoming with some result for Mr Nager

IMHO of course....
0

#47 User is offline   MINI 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 7810
  • Joined: 09-October 07

Posted 09 May 2014 - 11:20 AM

View Postnot their victim, on 09 May 2014 - 11:01 AM, said:


Toby Manhire is a Wellington-bred, Auckland-based journalist.

Toby Manhire: Advice for tweeting MPs
4:15 AM Friday May 9, 20141 commentPosted ImageJustice Minister Judith Collins. Photo / Getty ImagesIt's a jungle out there. As acclaimed media analyst and Prime Minister John Key has noted, the modern politician confronts not just the workaday knuckleheads of the mainstream media but a blizzard of blogsters, some of whom need to be regularly telephoned, as well as the trolls and bottom-feeders of social media.

This final category of sewer rats was codified by the PM this week after the embattled Judith Collins' brain exploded all over Twitter, goading TV3 into covering a bizarre attack on TVNZ's Katie Bradford. After a tweeted apology on Sunday, Collins was gone, dispatched to social-media Siberia.

Already I miss @judithcollinsmp: her bull-headedness, her wit, her incandescent double standards. She tweeted too close to the sun, however. It was always going to go up in flames. Drawing on her experience, and those of other politicians, I humbly offer 10 bits of advice for MPs on Twitter.

1. Don't feed the trolls (or troll the bottom-feeders)

The Prime Minister is right. They "get in people's head". The trick is to ignore them, rather than following Collins' Mad Max-style example. Bernard Shaw said it: Never wrestle with a pig. You end up covered in filth, and the pig loves it.

2. Engage

If you're making up numbers on the backbench, engage away. Hardly anyone is watching, so you can howl and blather all day long. See also, "@TauHenare".

Now that Maurice Williamson is unburdened by ministerial warrants, let's hope he ramps up the impudent tweeting. He's good at it. About a year ago, still basking in gay rainbow celebrity, the Pakuranga highwayman noticed a series of tweets from Henare detailing gym activity, such as: "WOD '300' 25min Cap / 25 Pull Ups (kips) / 50 D/L 40kg / 50 push-ups / 50 Box jumps 16 inch / 50 Box jumps 16 inch / 50 Flr Wipes." Williamson's reply: "Meanwhile in Emirates First Class Lounge in Dubai I did: 20 G&Ts 14 SavBlancs 6 BlackRussians 7 tequilas and 4 pints of lager."

3. Don't engage

After Collins blew a gasket on Sunday, Key advised politicians to use Twitter "as a broadcast medium". Such a suggestion will be blasphemy to New Zealand's several thousand social media experts, but he's right. If you're a senior politician, err on the side of non-engagement. Unless you're completely confident and proficient at it, just don't.

It is true that John Key's Twitter account is about as entertaining as lint (he has produced only two interesting tweets, the one-word "Bugger" after the America's Cup catastrophe, and an upside-down photograph of a supermarket) but that's how he likes it.

Consider a rare prime ministerial foray into engagement. When he tweeted something about economic growth being important, followed by: "What do you think?" the responses flooded in. "I also think that the weather is very important, what do you think?" said one. Another: "I think the children are our future. What do you think?" Then: "I am afraid of my inevitable decay and mortality. What do you think?" And: "Nice tie."

4. Be yourself

It is hard not to like @TauHenare. He takes a joke. As with @judithcollinsmp, not for a second could you imagine their tweets are posted by a staffer. Even if you're not a prolific tweeter, from time to time you should provide evidence of being a human.

Ed Balls, the British Labour Party finance guy, has his own chapter in the history of political Twitter. In 2011, he poetically posted, simply, "Ed Balls". He'd meant to search for his name, rather than publish, and "didn't realise" he was able to delete it. Now, April 28 is Ed Balls Day, when thousands of people mark the anniversary by tweeting (or retweeting) "Ed Balls". Both the Guardian and the Mirror - I'm not kidding - have live-blogged the occasion. To his credit, Balls joins in, too.

5. Don't be yourself

It's a public forum. You're a politician. You're not normal. Don't be yourself. As with all the other rules, this does not apply to Tau Henare.

6. Don't drink and tweet

Not even from your second Twitter account hilariously parodying a political rival.

7. No Weiners

In 2011, US congressman Anthony Weiner used Twitter to share with a 21-year-old woman an intimate selfie. This sort of thing has become de rigueur among New Zealand sportspeople of late, and that's bad enough, but among politicians it is a cardinal sin. Democracy cannot function if we think even fleetingly about our elected representatives' bits.

8. No selfies

Even the non-smutty ones have had their day. See also, "derp face".

9. Do not read lists of advice about using Twitter

10. If you're going to be a patronising arse, double-check the spelling.

My favourite political tweet of all time? From June last year, posted by British Conservative MP Andrew Selous: "Strongly support the loss of benefits unless claimants lean English."

- NZ Herald




"Never wrestle with a pig!!"

Very good advice. Maybe Ms Collins can now understand my Bundle of Documents I sent her re: Cyberbullying............stress leave etc.

And least we forget, not matter what anyone writes Labour and greens in the front on the polls. Dont know why the Pm is laughing. Maybe the Highs are floating all around parliament.

Mini
0

#48 User is offline   not their victim 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 10829
  • Joined: 04-August 08

Posted 09 May 2014 - 11:27 AM

MINI

OPEN STATEMENT.....


if you do need anyone to back up the bullying claims..please contact me via PM.....



I know we are not ""Friends"" but I hate what has been done to you.....via a certain group.....and you are not the only one with infamy on a certain site...



and a purported outing on said site does clear any association to the TBP....hahahahahahaha...if thats the right IDENTITY.......
1

#49 User is offline   MINI 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 7810
  • Joined: 09-October 07

Posted 09 May 2014 - 11:31 AM

View PostBLURB, on 09 May 2014 - 11:13 AM, said:

Cabinet Club claims 'envy', says Henare
STACEY KIRK]
Last updated 09:07 09/05/2014

Opposition attacks on National Party fundraisers, where individuals can pay for access to ministers, is Labour Party envy National MP Tau Henare says.

Labour and NZ First widened their attacks on the Government yesterday and claimed to have proof Prime Minister John Key was involved in talks to ease citizenship restrictions for wealthy foreign investors.

The allegations come out of reports on National Party events run throughout the country, called Cabinet Clubs.

But Henare said this morning that persistent allegations of cash-for-access being levelled at the Government by Opposition MPs were a deliberate tactic to even out the amount of donations between National and Labour.

"This is Labour Party envy about how people raise funds," he told Breakfast.

"Quite frankly what this says, is the National Party is a hell of a lot better at fundraising than these guys are, and that's where it comes from.

"This is a whole strategy.

"On Tuesday, they had the opportunity to come in with the smoking gun, with everything laid out for them, and what happened? The focus went on [Labour MP] Trevor [Mallard], because Trevor's up to his old tricks again."

In the House yesterday, Immigration Minister Michael Woodhouse fought off questions over a meeting he held with Donghua Liu, the Chinese businessmen at the centre of issues surrounding Maurice Williamson's resignation as minister last week.

NZ First leader Winston Peters questioned Woodhouse about Key's involvement in discussions and tabled letters written by developer Leigh Hopper which he said proved it.

The letters, written on behalf of the Construction Development Alliance to Key and the immigration minister of the time Nathan Guy in February and April 2012, profess to have Key's backing for changes to immigration laws.

Hopper wrote: "We look forward to building on the engagement that one of our members, Mr Donghua Liu ... had with the prime minister on this issue last year, in order to achieve a successful outcome in the near future."

In a second letter to Guy, Hopper said they had received "strong expressions of support" from Key.

But Hopper said he had not discussed the issue with Key personally, although members of the group had, and, although he was a party donor, he had never been granted preferential access.

The changes they sought, including an easing of language restrictions, were aimed at attracting more foreign investment but were never made, he said.

"My expectations and dealing and any conversations I've had with John Key in the past have been always squeaky clean," Hopper said.

"There's no way that John Key is ever going to infer that he'll grease the wheels for some money. Donghua Liu might ask ... that might be part of their Chinese culture, but it's not part of the New Zealand culture."

Liu was granted citizenship against official advice and donated $22,000 to the National Party.

Allegations against him of domestic violence led to the downfall of former building and construction minister Williamson, who phoned senior police about the case and resigned when the issue came to light.

Woodhouse told Parliament yesterday he knew of no such discussions between Key and members of the group but could go away and check, prompting criticism from Peters outside the House.

Labour MP Trevor Mallard found himself ejected from the House for a second time this week after asking if Woodhouse had ever been offered money by donors to the National Party who wanted influence.

Woodhouse said the accusations were "quite offensive really to suggest that that would even be offered, much less accepted".

Mallard, who was also on Breakfast today, said it was "increasingly clear" the policy debate was being driven through special access to ministers being granted to those who could afford it.

"The Cabinet Club is a very clear example of that," he said.

- Stuff

http://www.stuff.co....nvy-says-Henare


Is National MP Tau Henare attempting to get some free media attention by (jumping on the band wagon) getting involved at this time?


The polls dont seem to care who has the most money. National has always been know as the Rich fella's club. Certainaly not done much for us have they.

They dont give a rats about NZers only themselves and the international buddies. I must admit though it take a certain kind of savvy to be rich enough to take yourself to China to have dinner with your mates, but get the new zealand tax payer to pay for it!!

And go off for holidays in Hawaii and and play golf with the President of the United States, while your children need nit baths at school and you pull in other parents to groom them, not there own. No no we cannot expect too much of their poor parents to keep them clean.

The world is going mad, as a poor person battling to make ends met, the one thing you could do is give your kids a bath and clean their teeth, even if you had to you salt, instead of toothpaste.

What a huge gap between the rich and the poor in NZ. It is disgusting. I suppose there will be new crimes cause the goodies have been banned, and they will have to hit the bottle or something. Godzone, like yeah!!

Mini
0

#50 User is offline   MINI 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 7810
  • Joined: 09-October 07

Posted 09 May 2014 - 11:57 AM

View Postnot their victim, on 09 May 2014 - 11:16 AM, said:


Adam is a political reporter for the New Zealand Herald.

Collins shrugs off Labour attacks
6:57 AM Thursday Mar 20, 2014Justice Minister reveals she gave PM full account of China visit, including that she knew official would be at dinner.

Posted ImageJudith Collins insists Oravida business was not discussed at the dinner. Photo / NZ HeraldJustice Minister Judith Collins last night dismissed Labour claims that she had failed to tell Prime Minister John Key of further details about her dinner with a senior Chinese border control official last year.

Ms Collins last week apologised to Mr Key for not telling him sooner of the dinner she had in Beijing with her friends and Oravida bosses Stone Shi and Julia Xu, and the official.

Ms Collins told the PM of the dinner only after she came under pressure from the Opposition two weeks ago over claims of a conflict of interest in her meetings with Mr Shi and Ms Xu during the trip on justice portfolio business.

Ms Collins - whose husband, David Wong-Tung, is a director of milk exporter Oravida - also paid a visit to the company's Shanghai office, an event the firm used for promotional purposes.

While she has previously acknowledged that she was invited to the Beijing dinner before she left for China, yesterday she confirmed to Parliament that she also knew the border control official would be there and knew his name and position.

Labour MP Grant Robertson said it was beyond belief that Ms Collins thought meeting such a senior official with her husband's fellow directors did not give rise to a conflict of interest.

"John Key needs to reveal whether Judith Collins told him or his chief of staff this was a pre-planned dinner and that she knew the identity of the Chinese official before she left.

"If she didn't, she has surely used up the final warning the Prime Minister gave her," Mr Robertson said.

However, a spokeswoman from Ms Collins' office told the Herald that last week, the minister had given Mr Key's chief of staff, Wayne Eagleson, a full account of the visit, including the fact that she was aware before she left for China that the official would be at the dinner.

Speaking from Beijing, Mr Key said what Ms Collins had told him about the dinner was consistent with what she had said publicly in Parliament. He did not believe there was any further information that had not already been made public.

The month before Ms Collins' trip, Ms Xu said that Oravida was experiencing difficulties getting milk into China after the Fonterra botulism scare and that the New Zealand Government could do more to engage with Chinese officials to help.

However, Ms Collins has denied Oravida's business was discussed during the Beijing dinner.

Asked by NZ First Leader Winston Peters about her comment last week that Oravida wasn't experiencing any difficulties exporting milk to China, given Ms Xu's remarks, Ms Collins said: "What it does show is that I had very little knowledge of Oravida's business, and I should have had more."





Oravida expands into gold mining


Oravida has expanded its interests into gold mining.

Land records show the company spent $3.2 million buying land north of Auckland and on the South Island's West Coast about the time it began exporting milk in bulk to China.

Both chunks of land are used for dairy farming, although the West Coast land also has a prospecting licence registered in the name of Oravida director David Wong-Tung, Justice Minister Judith Collins' husband.

Mr Wong-Tung joined the company as a director in October 2011.

The appointment came around the time Oravida purchased land worth $1.9 million at Kaukapakapa, north of Auckland.

The dairy farm lines up with Oravida's desire to create its own milk supply chain, which dates back to interest in the Crafar farms in 2009.

The West Coast land, which stretches from the township of Ross up the Mikonui Valley, was bought in 2013.

The prospecting permit on it dates from November 2011, is held in Mr Wong-Tung's name, and authorises the company to search for gold, among other minerals.

Local resident Lynley Hargreaves - also an environmental campaigner - said she understood the company's interest was in mining the land and then using part of it for dairy.

Oravida's other commercial interests include swamp kauri products, honey, scampi and salmon.

It also intends to branch into beef, lamb and wine.

- NZ Herald




Kauri products!!! Oh my golly gosh and gumboots, I hope our claimant from the Council who got fired after ACC let his documentation go to his accredited employer can see who he is going up against.

Lets see if it all goes quite after the TV interview!!

Ms Collins snuggles up to the Kauri swamp products. OK thats it I am putting my name on the Register to get some of the slush fund that will be pouring out of the chinese buying up the east coast swamp land. Who would think, I would be a rich bitch eh?? Yahooo!!!

What a bargin, inherited land through belonging to a tribe.

NZ is so small isnt it now, the ACC and Justice minister, being married to a businessman who craves the land up for our most beautiful wood and sending it off overseas. If they could they would just tow NZ over there and crave it up.

Greedy buggers.

Mini
0

#51 User is offline   not their victim 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 10829
  • Joined: 04-August 08

Posted 09 May 2014 - 12:13 PM

MATRIMONIAL PROPERTY HAHAHAHAHAHA
0

#52 User is offline   MINI 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 7810
  • Joined: 09-October 07

Posted 09 May 2014 - 12:36 PM

View Postnot their victim, on 09 May 2014 - 12:13 PM, said:

MATRIMONIAL PROPERTY HAHAHAHAHAHA


No I was married to an Aussie!

So is my family property not his.

Mini
0

#53 User is offline   not their victim 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 10829
  • Joined: 04-August 08

Posted 09 May 2014 - 12:43 PM

MINI...

Im talking about Judith Collins........


ORAVIDA IS MATRIMONIAL PROPERTY LOL!!!!
0

#54 User is offline   MINI 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 7810
  • Joined: 09-October 07

Posted 09 May 2014 - 01:16 PM

View Postnot their victim, on 09 May 2014 - 12:43 PM, said:

MINI...

Im talking about Judith Collins........


ORAVIDA IS MATRIMONIAL PROPERTY LOL!!!!


Oh OK Hadnt got around to looking at it that deeply, but she certainly is in it up to her neck.

I think that is why the Nugel got the boot from Council, not the stuff given by ACC to Council but messing with the big guys, international backing, and kauri shipped off to China.

Does who backs the two doing it up there make a difference. Will have to look up the names etc.

What a minefield.

That one would make an intriging book. I think we will have a new ACC, Justice minister next year, even if opps National get in again.

Must go have some lunch.

Mini
0

#55 User is offline   BLURB 

  • accforum.nz
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 5774
  • Joined: 22-July 06
  • LocationCambridge

Posted 10 May 2014 - 08:15 AM

Update of Stuff's Opinion Poll as @ 8.10am 10 May 2014

Can Judith Collins stay on as a minister?


Yes, the controversy doesn't affect how she works
1090 votes, 27.1%

Yes, but only just
350 votes, 8.7%

No, it's the last straw and she should resign
2588 votes, 64.3%

Total 4028 votes


Please keep in mind that Stuff's Opinion Poll is not reliable due to the fact you can place a vote everyday. In short, you're not restricted to just one vote.
0

#56 User is offline   Brucey 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 9394
  • Joined: 26-January 07
  • LocationEarth

Posted 10 May 2014 - 10:15 AM

http://www.nzherald....jectid=11252568


Audrey Young: A big question hanging over Judith Collins

5:00 AM Saturday May 10, 2014




Has the influential and polarising MP ruined her leadership chances?


To understand the demise of Judith Collins, it helps to understand what a powerful role she has carved out for herself in the National Party.

Until this past month, she was not only National's most senior woman in ranking, but in influence as well.

With Collins' stocks on the decline, that position has been taken by Paula Bennett.

But Collins attracts strong followers. In fact, it could be said she has a following. She understands the party and her devotion to it enhanced her position in it.

John Key is supremely secure in the party leadership but were National to lose power at the election, there could be a leadership contest within five months.

Key is already on record as saying he would not want to stick around to be leader of the Opposition.



Collins' ambition to become the next leader has been so clear that Key talked about it openly in March with the Weekend Herald, when the Oravida affair first arose.

She said, unconvincingly, it was something she hadn't really thought about.

Key may still be right in his comment then that the Oravida affair has not affected her ambitions. It is not in her nature to give up.

But after the initial error of judgment, her mishandling of the issue, and the stress she has experienced, it has plainly affected her prospects.

The extent of Collins' demise can be measured by the fact that the big question is no longer whether she has damaged her chances of leadership. The question is whether she will survive as a minister.

Collins loyalists refuse to believe her leadership prospects have been destroyed.

They see a minister who has been unfairly hounded by the Opposition while contending with an undisclosed health scare.

"Judith is a very kind and compassionate person," says former party president John Slater.

His own wife, Margaret, died about 18 months ago after battling cancer and Collins went out of her way to offer the family support, usually with flowers.

"I've seen the soft side and I was deeply moved when she came, at least three times, on a Sunday afternoon to our home," he says. "That tells you about somebody that is a caring person."

He does not believe she has been irrevocably damaged by the Oravida affair.

"Not at all. I think the Opposition have been cruel in the way they have pursued it."

Collins is a polarising figure. She makes enemies easily.

Even in the party there are those who privately say she has got her comeuppance, that she is a victim of her own arrogance and that her enforced leave shows she could not handle the pressure of leadership.

Collins is No5 in Cabinet and a member of Key's Kitchen Cabinet. She has championed the role of women in the party, mentoring female MPs such as chief whip Louise Upston and former list MP Jackie Blue, whom she appointed as Human Rights Commissioner for Women.

The National Party board has been upbraided by Collins about needing to lift its game in the treatment of women in the party instead of tending to consign them to marginal seats.

She has made the most of her Ethnic Affairs portfolio to cultivate good relationships with ethnic communities, although she didn't seek the portfolio.

She has cultivated loyalty from the Young Nationals, although a great House of Cards rip-off quote by president Sean Topham, reportedly about Collins at the Young Nats Ball ("I love that woman more than sharks love blood"), was actually about Paula Bennett, he says.

She has been assiduous in cultivating good relationships with backbenchers and her coterie of acolytes is well known, including Upston, Sam Lotu-Iiga, Jami-Lee Ross and more senior supporters such as Anne Tolley and Maurice Williamson.

She has been equally assiduous in cultivating good relationships with the news media. She has a gift for recognising and feeding the public's appetite for conflict.

Every so often she will summon a chosen one for an audience in her office to receive a good story with lashings of quotes to turbocharge its potency.

"I make no apology for my good relationship with the media," she told the Listener's Jane Clifton in 2011 when her colleagues may have been left wondering why her profile was so high.

She likes being audacious. She likes a bit of shock and awe.

There was something else in her eyes on TV3 last Sunday when she turned on TVNZ reporter Katie Bradford over a private conversation four years ago. It appeared less audacious and more vindictive and calculating - and quite revealing.

Collins looked shattered on Tuesday heading into Parliament, after two months of torment by the Opposition over her dealings in China with the milk exporting company Oravida, which her husband helps run.

She had already suffered the ignominy of a lecture in caucus by Bill English - "we support you as a colleague but not your actions" was the gist of it - on top of the Prime Minister telling the country she should take some time off.

Tolley has been by Collins' side most of the week, but on Tuesday Paula Bennett joined the support team.

Both Collins and Bennett declined to talk to the Weekend Herald, but there is no mistaking that Bennett is on the ascendancy in terms of her influence in the party.

It was happening before the Collins decline, but it is more obvious now.

Bennett got the seat she wanted in Upper Harbour. She has recently been appointed to National's campaign committee.

She has the active patronage of the Prime Minister and Deputy Prime Minister and would almost certainly leapfrog over Collins in the rankings were National to get a third term - assuming Collins survives.

If National did not win a third term, Bennett, who entered Parliament in 2005, could well be a contender for at least deputy leader.

Collins became an MP in 2002, the same intake as John Key and former leader Don Brash.

She challenged sitting MP Warren Kyd for selection and has had a steady rise to influence.

The strongest theme of her maiden speech, besides a love of family, was a contempt for unions, which had given her trouble in a past life as a restaurateur.

Williamson by then had been an MP for 15 years and it is little wonder he was impressed by Collins. He wanted National better defined; he wanted policy that was hated by the likes of Sue Bradford and the Rev Charles Waldegrave.

Brash gave Collins her big break, making her welfare spokeswoman after two years in Parliament when Katherine Rich resigned because of his second Orewa speech.

The appointment was a no-brainer, Brash admits. He clearly wanted a woman in the role and with only five in the caucus of 27, and Rich and Georgina te Heuheu having fallen out with him, the choice was Collins, Pansy Wong or Sandra Goudie.

Yes, she is to the right of the party, he says.

"But the National Party is not a terribly ideological-driven party. So being on the right of the party doesn't mark you as being terribly ideological.

"She is very intelligent, very strong and I've always thought she would go far in politics."

Brash believes Collins could still run a credible challenge for the leadership.

But the fact that Key had ordered her to take a week off implied she buckled under pressure, and that was something she would have to overcome.

"I'm not saying she has buckled under pressure," Brash says. "That is the perception."

He takes a more tolerant view of her indiscretions. "I like to show compassion for people and not put the boot in when they are down."

- NZ Herald
0

#57 User is offline   MINI 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 7810
  • Joined: 09-October 07

Posted 10 May 2014 - 01:00 PM

View Postangryman, on 10 May 2014 - 10:15 AM, said:

http://www.nzherald....jectid=11252568


Audrey Young: A big question hanging over Judith Collins

5:00 AM Saturday May 10, 2014




Has the influential and polarising MP ruined her leadership chances?


To understand the demise of Judith Collins, it helps to understand what a powerful role she has carved out for herself in the National Party.

Until this past month, she was not only National's most senior woman in ranking, but in influence as well.

With Collins' stocks on the decline, that position has been taken by Paula Bennett.

But Collins attracts strong followers. In fact, it could be said she has a following. She understands the party and her devotion to it enhanced her position in it.

John Key is supremely secure in the party leadership but were National to lose power at the election, there could be a leadership contest within five months.

Key is already on record as saying he would not want to stick around to be leader of the Opposition.



Collins' ambition to become the next leader has been so clear that Key talked about it openly in March with the Weekend Herald, when the Oravida affair first arose.

She said, unconvincingly, it was something she hadn't really thought about.

Key may still be right in his comment then that the Oravida affair has not affected her ambitions. It is not in her nature to give up.

But after the initial error of judgment, her mishandling of the issue, and the stress she has experienced, it has plainly affected her prospects.

The extent of Collins' demise can be measured by the fact that the big question is no longer whether she has damaged her chances of leadership. The question is whether she will survive as a minister.

Collins loyalists refuse to believe her leadership prospects have been destroyed.

They see a minister who has been unfairly hounded by the Opposition while contending with an undisclosed health scare.

"Judith is a very kind and compassionate person," says former party president John Slater.

His own wife, Margaret, died about 18 months ago after battling cancer and Collins went out of her way to offer the family support, usually with flowers.

"I've seen the soft side and I was deeply moved when she came, at least three times, on a Sunday afternoon to our home," he says. "That tells you about somebody that is a caring person."

He does not believe she has been irrevocably damaged by the Oravida affair.

"Not at all. I think the Opposition have been cruel in the way they have pursued it."

Collins is a polarising figure. She makes enemies easily.

Even in the party there are those who privately say she has got her comeuppance, that she is a victim of her own arrogance and that her enforced leave shows she could not handle the pressure of leadership.

Collins is No5 in Cabinet and a member of Key's Kitchen Cabinet. She has championed the role of women in the party, mentoring female MPs such as chief whip Louise Upston and former list MP Jackie Blue, whom she appointed as Human Rights Commissioner for Women.

The National Party board has been upbraided by Collins about needing to lift its game in the treatment of women in the party instead of tending to consign them to marginal seats.

She has made the most of her Ethnic Affairs portfolio to cultivate good relationships with ethnic communities, although she didn't seek the portfolio.

She has cultivated loyalty from the Young Nationals, although a great House of Cards rip-off quote by president Sean Topham, reportedly about Collins at the Young Nats Ball ("I love that woman more than sharks love blood"), was actually about Paula Bennett, he says.

She has been assiduous in cultivating good relationships with backbenchers and her coterie of acolytes is well known, including Upston, Sam Lotu-Iiga, Jami-Lee Ross and more senior supporters such as Anne Tolley and Maurice Williamson.

She has been equally assiduous in cultivating good relationships with the news media. She has a gift for recognising and feeding the public's appetite for conflict.

Every so often she will summon a chosen one for an audience in her office to receive a good story with lashings of quotes to turbocharge its potency.

"I make no apology for my good relationship with the media," she told the Listener's Jane Clifton in 2011 when her colleagues may have been left wondering why her profile was so high.

She likes being audacious. She likes a bit of shock and awe.

There was something else in her eyes on TV3 last Sunday when she turned on TVNZ reporter Katie Bradford over a private conversation four years ago. It appeared less audacious and more vindictive and calculating - and quite revealing.

Collins looked shattered on Tuesday heading into Parliament, after two months of torment by the Opposition over her dealings in China with the milk exporting company Oravida, which her husband helps run.

She had already suffered the ignominy of a lecture in caucus by Bill English - "we support you as a colleague but not your actions" was the gist of it - on top of the Prime Minister telling the country she should take some time off.

Tolley has been by Collins' side most of the week, but on Tuesday Paula Bennett joined the support team.

Both Collins and Bennett declined to talk to the Weekend Herald, but there is no mistaking that Bennett is on the ascendancy in terms of her influence in the party.

It was happening before the Collins decline, but it is more obvious now.

Bennett got the seat she wanted in Upper Harbour. She has recently been appointed to National's campaign committee.

She has the active patronage of the Prime Minister and Deputy Prime Minister and would almost certainly leapfrog over Collins in the rankings were National to get a third term - assuming Collins survives.

If National did not win a third term, Bennett, who entered Parliament in 2005, could well be a contender for at least deputy leader.

Collins became an MP in 2002, the same intake as John Key and former leader Don Brash.

She challenged sitting MP Warren Kyd for selection and has had a steady rise to influence.

The strongest theme of her maiden speech, besides a love of family, was a contempt for unions, which had given her trouble in a past life as a restaurateur.

Williamson by then had been an MP for 15 years and it is little wonder he was impressed by Collins. He wanted National better defined; he wanted policy that was hated by the likes of Sue Bradford and the Rev Charles Waldegrave.

Brash gave Collins her big break, making her welfare spokeswoman after two years in Parliament when Katherine Rich resigned because of his second Orewa speech.

The appointment was a no-brainer, Brash admits. He clearly wanted a woman in the role and with only five in the caucus of 27, and Rich and Georgina te Heuheu having fallen out with him, the choice was Collins, Pansy Wong or Sandra Goudie.

Yes, she is to the right of the party, he says.

"But the National Party is not a terribly ideological-driven party. So being on the right of the party doesn't mark you as being terribly ideological.

"She is very intelligent, very strong and I've always thought she would go far in politics."

Brash believes Collins could still run a credible challenge for the leadership.

But the fact that Key had ordered her to take a week off implied she buckled under pressure, and that was something she would have to overcome.

"I'm not saying she has buckled under pressure," Brash says. "That is the perception."

He takes a more tolerant view of her indiscretions. "I like to show compassion for people and not put the boot in when they are down."

- NZ Herald


Not cool to mention Jackie Blue on ACCforum, who has been in cohoots with Lauda Finem.

Ie paperwork exists that Jackie Blue was targeted by one Nottingham lad that is supposed to be a lawyer in Sydney Australia, right??? Yeah right!!!

So you see how small NZ is!! Some lousey lying site that backs Thomas for retrial, is actually in sending e-mails to a NZ parlimentarian.

And for more news............nay thats enough for the moment.

It will all be made public in time.

I would love to have a talk to Ms Collins parliamentary friend that was promoted by her if what is written above is true, as she sure came down in a hurry. Wonder how many e-mails she received from Nottingham??

Lotta spooks in the cubboard eh??

Mini
0

Share this topic:


  • 3 Pages +
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

1 User(s) are reading this topic
0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users