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Mp Calls For Corruption & Fraud Probe

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Posted 08 December 2004 - 12:25 PM

Quite timely this article should surface. IMHO investigation into OSH ought to be petitioned for, and in conjunction with investigating osh, investigate the ACC and the Dept of Labour.

With allegations of fraud and corruption in the Dept of Labour, little faith can be held the organisations under the control of the Dept will be any better, acc is one of those.



MP Calls For Corruption & Fraud Probe
08/12/2004 11:55 AM
Tim Donoghue - The Independent


Epsom MP Richard Worth has accused the Labour Department of giving its information technology provider, Twywell Technology Ltd, favourable commercial treatment, possibly involving "fraud and corruption."

At issue is $8.4 million the department is said to have paid Twywell during the past seven years.

Under the protection of parliamentary privilege, Worth, a former chairman of law firm Simpson Grierson, called for immediate inquiries by the Audit Office and the Transport and Industrial Relations Select Committee into the department's handling of its technology contract issues.

Worth said these inquiries would reveal whether a Serious Fraud Office inquiry would be appropriate.

Worth told Parliament Twywell Technology Ltd established two nominee companies, with hidden beneficial ownership. These did contract work for the department.

Richard Ninness, PR-man for the Department of Labour, told The Independent one of those nominee companies, Da Vinci Integration, had received tender documents from Twywell in 2001.

"At that stage we did observe to Twywell there was a potential conflict of interest. We pointed this out to Twywell at the time," Ninness said.

Worth's speech last Wednesday followed numerous written questions to Labour Minister Paul Swain about Twywell's seven-year contractual relationship with the department.

Swain's answers revealed Twywell had not been subjected to an annual departmental survey since March 2002. The department paid Twywell $2.8 million for services rendered during the 2003-04 financial year.

Maxine Margaret Welsh is Masterton-registered Twywell's owner and director.

Worth told Parliament MPs should be aware the activities of Twywell and Welsh did not involve small amounts of money.

"According to the minister, the department has paid this company since 1997 some $8.4 million - an average in excess of $1.2 million per year. Its staff numbers appear to vary between two and seven at any one time," Worth said.

Swain's answers also revealed Twywell had done no tendering for work since 1997.

Worth quizzed Swain about complaints of "unprofessional behaviour" involving Twywell Technology.

Speaking generally, Worth said Twywell was involved in managing the department's information technology requirements.

"These [written] questions have provoked a flood of deeply disturbing information from within the public service," Worth said.

He said his informants within the elements. One was fear. "The other is grave concern for the reputation of the department and its administrative practices," Worth said.

He said the fear related to a disclosure of identity, of intimidation, of unprofessional behaviour and of retaliation damaging to their reputations.

It also related to their jobs, their ability to work in future with the department and other state sector agencies.

"These are concerned, brave people. Even more disturbingly, these informants assert that answers provided by the minister to the questions I have asked of him have been misleading. They fall short of portraying the full picture of the relationships that have developed between Twywell Technology Ltd and officials of the department over the past seven years," Worth said.

During this period Twywell Technology Ltd has, according to Swain, provided management services and carried out numerous specific project management roles.

"The more projects it recommends and has accepted as necessary, the more work it generates for itself across all these areas," Worth said.

"It holds, therefore, a powerful position requiring the utmost integrity.

But the activities carried out by Twywell as described by the minister demonstrate the existence of conflicts of interest that are difficult to resolve in view of the status of Twywell as a contractor to the department....

"Members should also know that the director of Twywell Technology Ltd was involved in establishing nominee companies so that the beneficial ownership of such companies was hidden to carry out work for the department.

"The work undertaken in one case and set up for undertaking in another case, according to the answers from the minister, involved Twywell in setting specifications, assessing the validity of a tender process and managing the projects.

"So it was that the sole director of Twywell set up a company called Da Vinci Integration. In December 2001 Da Vinci Integration was a "request for provision of services" recipient. Who was to evaluate these RFPs? None other than Twywell. A gross conflict of interest and breach of faith. So it was that Knight Technology International Ltd, another nominee Twywell company, provided services to the department from April 2002 to June 2002," Worth said.

"Members might like to know what those with a close knowledge of Twywell's activities within the department have to say. They refer to greedy and unethical behaviour, unprofessional behaviour while representing the department, unprofessional relationships with senior members of the department, verbal abuse of suppliers and staff that become intimidatory.

"It's an ugly picture, consistent with fraud and corruption. There is an urgent need for investigation of these issues."

Labour Department chief executive James Buwalda and Welsh did not return The Independent's calls.

But PR-man Ninness said the department had not seen any evidence of fraud or criminal behaviour relating to its contractual relationship with Twywell.

"We know what has occurred and we don't see any need for select committee or Audit Office inquiries," Ninness said.

http://xtramsn.co.nz...3921620,00.html
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#2 Guest_IDB_*

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Posted 02 February 2005 - 10:43 AM

nope theres another article, i'll hunt it down from the archive....
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#3 Guest_IDB_*

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Posted 02 February 2005 - 10:51 AM

aha - here it is, not quite as i originally thought but close enough:



Immigration told to clean up corruption among staff

30.11.04
By MATHEW DEARNALEY

The Immigration Service is under growing pressure to root out staff corruption after finding at least 15 more cases of dishonesty in the year to June.

The number of complaints upheld against immigration staff was up from nine cases the year before, when two local officials at overseas posts were sacked for taking bribes.

The revelations brought a sharp rebuke yesterday from Parliament's finance and expenditure select committee, which said it was concerned to learn that 95 allegations of misconduct were made last year against immigration officials.

Although 55 were unsubstantiated, the committee said any corrupt activities by individuals employed by a New Zealand Government department were "completely unacceptable." It said it expected the Labour Department, of which the Immigration Service is part, "to give high priority to addressing deficiencies in its control environment to resolve this issue".

The service's chief operating officer, Brendan Quirk, said last night that it had introduced better systems at its branches worldwide to guard against corruption.

It was also educating all overseas staff to fend off improper approaches from families and friends.

Asked about the greater number of complaints and proven cases of misconduct last year, he said the service had hired a former policeman as an internal investigator to assist local managers, and noted that applicants had become more aware of how to raise concerns.

Although the select committee report said individuals had received money illegally in "a small number of cases", Mr Quirk could point to only two instances of outright bribery.

These included a case in Bangkok last year when a Thai staff member was caught swindling thousands of dollars from Cambodian visa applicants.

Mr Quirk believed the other was in New Delhi, but could not be sure as he was at home and did not have the relevant file.

Other cases involved staff doing favours without financial reward. And one in Suva last year involved an "inappropriate advance" by a staff member from the local community towards an applicant.

Mr Quirk would not say just what that was, but confirmed the employee had been dismissed, as had most of the other 14 staff caught out last year.

http://www.nzherald....bjectID=8500943
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#4 User is offline   gaffa09 

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Posted 31 March 2006 - 11:12 AM

Well here is another one to bring forward .
Over a year down the track yet nothing done .
Lets start our own party Then we will get action

We will get the votes
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#5 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 30 October 2009 - 05:04 PM

View PostIDB, on Dec 8 2004, 02:25 PM, said:

Quite timely this article should surface. IMHO investigation into OSH ought to be petitioned for, and in conjunction with investigating osh, investigate the ACC and the Dept of Labour.

With allegations of fraud and corruption in the Dept of Labour, little faith can be held the organisations under the control of the Dept will be any better, acc is one of those.

MP Calls For Corruption & Fraud Probe
08/12/2004 11:55 AM
Tim Donoghue - The Independent


Epsom MP Richard Worth has accused the Labour Department of giving its information technology provider, Twywell Technology Ltd, favourable commercial treatment, possibly involving "fraud and corruption."

At issue is $8.4 million the department is said to have paid Twywell during the past seven years.

Under the protection of parliamentary privilege, Worth, a former chairman of law firm Simpson Grierson, called for immediate inquiries by the Audit Office and the Transport and Industrial Relations Select Committee into the department's handling of its technology contract issues.

Worth said these inquiries would reveal whether a Serious Fraud Office inquiry would be appropriate.

Worth told Parliament Twywell Technology Ltd established two nominee companies, with hidden beneficial ownership. These did contract work for the department.

Richard Ninness, PR-man for the Department of Labour, told The Independent one of those nominee companies, Da Vinci Integration, had received tender documents from Twywell in 2001.

"At that stage we did observe to Twywell there was a potential conflict of interest. We pointed this out to Twywell at the time," Ninness said.


Worth's speech last Wednesday followed numerous written questions to Labour Minister Paul Swain about Twywell's seven-year contractual relationship with the department.

Swain's answers revealed Twywell had not been subjected to an annual departmental survey since March 2002. The department paid Twywell $2.8 million for services rendered during the 2003-04 financial year.

Maxine Margaret Welsh is Masterton-registered Twywell's owner and director.

Worth told Parliament MPs should be aware the activities of Twywell and Welsh did not involve small amounts of money.

"According to the minister, the department has paid this company since 1997 some $8.4 million - an average in excess of $1.2 million per year. Its staff numbers appear to vary between two and seven at any one time," Worth said.

Swain's answers also revealed Twywell had done no tendering for work since 1997.

Worth quizzed Swain about complaints of "unprofessional behaviour" involving Twywell Technology.

Speaking generally, Worth said Twywell was involved in managing the department's information technology requirements.

"These [written] questions have provoked a flood of deeply disturbing information from within the public service," Worth said.

He said his informants within the elements. One was fear. "The other is grave concern for the reputation of the department and its administrative practices," Worth said.

He said the fear related to a disclosure of identity, of intimidation, of unprofessional behaviour and of retaliation damaging to their reputations.

It also related to their jobs, their ability to work in future with the department and other state sector agencies.

"These are concerned, brave people. Even more disturbingly, these informants assert that answers provided by the minister to the questions I have asked of him have been misleading. They fall short of portraying the full picture of the relationships that have developed between Twywell Technology Ltd and officials of the department over the past seven years," Worth said.

During this period Twywell Technology Ltd has, according to Swain, provided management services and carried out numerous specific project management roles.

"The more projects it recommends and has accepted as necessary, the more work it generates for itself across all these areas," Worth said.

"It holds, therefore, a powerful position requiring the utmost integrity.

But the activities carried out by Twywell as described by the minister demonstrate the existence of conflicts of interest that are difficult to resolve in view of the status of Twywell as a contractor to the department....

"Members should also know that the director of Twywell Technology Ltd was involved in establishing nominee companies so that the beneficial ownership of such companies was hidden to carry out work for the department.

"The work undertaken in one case and set up for undertaking in another case, according to the answers from the minister, involved Twywell in setting specifications, assessing the validity of a tender process and managing the projects.

"So it was that the sole director of Twywell set up a company called Da Vinci Integration. In December 2001 Da Vinci Integration was a "request for provision of services" recipient. Who was to evaluate these RFPs? None other than Twywell. A gross conflict of interest and breach of faith. So it was that Knight Technology International Ltd, another nominee Twywell company, provided services to the department from April 2002 to June 2002," Worth said.

"Members might like to know what those with a close knowledge of Twywell's activities within the department have to say. They refer to greedy and unethical behaviour, unprofessional behaviour while representing the department, unprofessional relationships with senior members of the department, verbal abuse of suppliers and staff that become intimidatory.

"It's an ugly picture, consistent with fraud and corruption. There is an urgent need for investigation of these issues."

Labour Department chief executive James Buwalda and Welsh did not return The Independent's calls.

But PR-man Ninness said the department had not seen any evidence of fraud or criminal behaviour relating to its contractual relationship with Twywell.

"We know what has occurred and we don't see any need for select committee or Audit Office inquiries," Ninness said.

http://xtramsn.co.nz...3921620,00.html



Does anyone know if Richard Ninness is still at working for Dept of Labour?

He was involved in ACCs Fraud Unit in 1997-98 when Gavin ROBINS & his brother were jailed for ACC Fraud & purchasing of Helicopters.

Incidently it's around same time Bill Cochrane Whangarei ACC Branch manager was convicted & jailed for ACC matters which are understood to relate to fraud.

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#6 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 31 October 2012 - 12:19 AM

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#7 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 10 July 2014 - 05:38 PM

For the Australians that are effected by this, there is more about Gavin Robins on this forum.
Put the name Gavin Robins in the top right-hand search box and up it pops.




Remote 'privatisation' row

The Australian
May 16, 2009 12:00AM

http://www.theaustra...d83aa40f4dad46c


Natasha Robinson
Reporter
Sydney

IN the Western Desert region of the East Pilbara, a battle is brewing in Aboriginal health policy. Four tiny Aboriginal communities - Jigalong, Parnngurr, Kunawarritji and Punmu - have been neglected by federal and state governments.

But in 2004 the federal government suddenly became interested in the communities' health clinic, the Puntukurnu Aboriginal Medical Service, initiating a review of governance and health service delivery that eventually led to a private company being awarded a contract to administer the service.

Five years later that company, Sovereign Health Care Australia, is still reaping a profit from its management of PAMS and the Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia wants to know why.

In Jigalong, the community is becoming increasingly concerned that funded medical programs are not being carried out, nursing and Aboriginal health worker positions have remained unfilled for long stretches, and medical records are sometimes inaccessible to doctors because the health services administration is in Newman, 160km from Jigalong.

Publicly funded Aboriginal health centres long have been community controlled and serious questions arise when a private company is handed control of an Aboriginal health centre. Such circumstances should arise only when there is clear evidence of dysfunction in the running of the centre, Aboriginal Health Council of WA chief executive Darryl Kickett says.

"If you have a third party running an Aboriginal community controlled health service, the third-party arrangement should only need to provide for reforms that get an organisation back on track," Kickett says.

"I think what we are trying to do is guard against the ... behaviour of any third-party arrangement. We need a policy to deal with that, that is fair to everyone."

Months of controversy over the running of the health clinic came to a head yesterday at the PAMS annual general meeting. The AGM followed the recent election of new members to the PAMS governing committee, which were deemed invalid by the government watchdog for Aboriginal bodies, the Office of the Registrar of Indigenous Corporations.

One of those elected was Jigalong resident Billy Cadigan, 50, who says he is distressed to see a private company running his community's health centre.

"Our Martu people, they are the ones that set this health centre up back in 1984," Cadigan says. "I would like to get our Aboriginal medical service back."

The background to how PAMS became effectively privatised is complex, but it can be boiled down to a few key details.

In 2004, the federal government, through its Office for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health, initiated a review of PAMS on the back of infighting among management. The office chose a consultant, former New Zealand Accident Compensation Commission executive Gavin Robins, to carry out the review. Among the key findings were that PAMS lacked strategic business and health plans, that there were problems with corporate governance and that management and accounting services were being outsourced to Perth, bringing about "a steady decline in the service's overall performance".


Rather than assist the health service to strengthen its governance structures and improve its strategic planning, the office took the dramatic step of placing the administration of the health service in the hands of Sovereign Health Care Australia. Sovereign Health Care did not respond to Weekend Health's request for an interview.

Randolph Spargo has worked for PAMS as a remote physician for the past 11 years. Before 2004, Spargo was one of two doctors employed by the health service. The two took it in turns to travel the 1600km round-trip to each of the Martu communities for which PAMS is the primary healthcare provider.

Some time after Sovereign Health Care took over administration of the clinic, Spargo found himself working alone. He calls 2004 a "memorable year".

"I have been on continuous call ever since," Spargo says. The doctor received no explanation as to why Sovereign Health Care believed that just one doctor was sufficient to service four far-flung communities. Speaking from Jigalong, he says it has been a battle to maintain the continuity so essential to primary health care since he has found himself working solo.

"From the time I get into this clinic, I don't stop," Spargo says.

"I've got to answer the phones, I've got to hold things together. I've got to do things that I shouldn't have to be doing but I have to do to keep things rolling along."

The doctor lives in a house that is rapidly deteriorating. Yet as assets in Jigalong are neglected, Sovereign Health is paying tens of thousands of dollars each year in wages and rental costs for its management team in Newman.

When the health service's manager is on leave, no back-up labour is provided and Spargo says at times he has had to wait weeks for pathology results to be delivered.

Recently, Sovereign Health employed a second doctor for PAMS on a fly in, fly out basis. The doctor is employed to work continuously for four weeks, then have a four-week break before returning to the community.

Spargo is highly critical of this arrangement, which he says is detrimental to health service delivery and wasteful of taxpayers' dollars. "There is one word that is central to primary health care and that is continuity," he says. "I believe the Australian Government would be very embarrassed if it was known that they are paying doctors to work in remote Australia to not work for four weeks at a time."

But Spargo reserves his most scathing criticism for the way a community-controlled Aboriginal health service effectively has beenprivatised with the sanction of the federal government.

"The real issue here is that you can't have a private company in management side-by-side by a single-tiered structure which has the authority for its association and its medical service," he says. An Aboriginal-controlled medical service can't sit side-by-side with a private entity. It needs to be Aboriginal controlled, not private controlled, and not by an absentee management."

But not everyone in Jigalong shares Spargo's view.

Community member Darren Farmer, who has a background in Aboriginal affairs, sees no problem with a private company running an Aboriginal medical service. "A lot of communities are administered and managed by outside firms, whether it be accounting or administration or whatever," Farmer says. "In this day and age a lot of communities are administered by outside sources anyway. What's the difference here?"

Farmer rejects Spargo's view that health service provision had suffered since Sovereign Health Care took control.

"As far as I am concerned, from a community point of view, the clinic is open, we have nurses in the clinics, we've got doctors there and people access services every day," he says.

A spokeswoman for the federal health department said the department was "of course concerned about some of the issues raised in relation to PAMS", and would "continue to monitor the situation".

However, she declined to comment on the specifics of the matters raised, saying they "related to the day-to-day operations of the organisation" which were the responsibility of PAMS.
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