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Nohsac Report Due Nov. 8 2004 Potentially heavy stuff.Watch this space

#1 User is offline   ernie 

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Posted 02 November 2004 - 05:11 PM

NOHSAC’s first research report “The Burden of Occupational Injury and Disease in New Zealand” will be available on the 8th November 2004.
Watch this space !!! This promises to be heavy stuff.


Here is the foreword to the June 2004 annual report to the Associate Minister of Labour…

This is the first annual report of the National Occupational Health and Safety Advisory Committee (NOHSAC).

NOHSAC was established to provide independent contestable advice to the Minister of Labour on major occupational health and safety issues.

The Committee is implementing a work programme agreed with the Associate Minister of Labour. It has launched a Committee website www.nohsac.govt.nz, and will shortly publish its first report on the burden of occupational disease and injury in New Zealand.

The Committee has been established at a time when it is increasingly being recognised that occupational injury has received disproportionate attention from OSH, at the expense of occupational health, which accounts for a much greater
burden of occupational morbidity and mortality. The work of the Committee will help to redress this imbalance and to provide the Minister with advice on the major current occupational health and safety issues, the policy measures that are likely to yield the greatest benefits, the occupational health and safety workforce needs, and the associated training needs.

These issues are not without controversy, but it is intended that the Committee will play a positive role in building on our current strengths, and addressing our current weaknesses, so that the major occupational health and safety hazards can be addressed in an appropriate and effective manner that is to the benefit of all New Zealanders.

Prof Neil Pearce
Chair
National Occupational Health and Safety Advisory Committee
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#2 User is offline   fairgo 

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Posted 02 November 2004 - 09:55 PM

Amen!
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#3 User is offline   doppelganger 

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Posted 05 November 2004 - 10:57 PM

Worked out the cost of my a while back to th ecomunity and it was more than the amount the ACC has invested
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#4 User is offline   doppelganger 

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Posted 06 November 2004 - 08:15 PM

I had a good day in a way today. I know tat it is my injury that is preventing me from returning to my previous occupation before the Accident.

that is right I was offered a job and after hours of discussion it was decided to give someone else a go. it is amaseing that there is still a shortage in the forestry in experance 'Bushmen'. it is not all lost as i may just get a teaching position if he finds a right person that needs to be brought up to speed quickly.

If i was given the job my previous injury could affect his levey. we discussed many options about how to overcome this chalange.

the most practable but as the ACC would object to paying the balance of the week the self employed sceam would have to be looked at. the cover would have to be that if I worked a full week but the levey would be paid on working only part of the week. would ACC accept that. I doubt that they have the brain power even to be able to calulate it

there was a conclusion that if ACC did allow tis to happen it would be shitting in its own nest as this is showing that I am unable to work full time in my previous occupation with out full rehabilitation being supplied.

He may just want to help me in getting a full forestry thinning operation underway. To do this I must own at least 75% of the plant. My Loss of earnings cover that 75% but getting the loss of earnings is a big battle.

Turnover would be about $200,000 a week with about $48,000 in wages pet week.
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#5 User is offline   ernie 

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Posted 08 November 2004 - 04:02 PM

The report of the National Occupational Health and Safety Advisory Committee (NOHSAC) "The Burden of Occupational Injury and Disease in New Zealand" now available online. Summary report at:

http://www.nohsac.govt.nz/documents/Report...terofLabour.pdf

Full technical report at http://www.nohsac.govt.nz/documents/Burden...nicalReport.pdf. (Beware, anyone on dial-up access - this is a 218 page pdf, so will take a long time to download).

Some interesting/disturbing quotes from the report:

"IT IS ESTIMATED THAT EACH YEAR IN NEW ZEALAND THERE ARE:

• about 700-1,000 deaths from occupational disease, particularly cancer,
respiratory disease and ischaemic heart disease
• about 100 deaths from occupational injury
• 17,000-20,000 new cases of work-related disease
• about 200,000 occupational accidents resulting in ACC claims, about
half of which result in disability and about 6% in permanent disability.


"IN ADDITION, IT IS ESTIMATED THAT:

• of all deaths in people age 20 or older, 2%-4% are due to
occupational disease
• of all cancer deaths in people age 30 or older, 3%-6% are due to
occupational cancer
• work-related fatal injuries account for 7.3% of all external causes of
death in people age 20 or older (105 of 1,435).

There is no valid data available on the costs to New Zealand of these deaths, injuries and illnesses. However, it is believed that the cost to
society is about $4.3 billion to $8.7 billion each year.

IN A STUDY OF WORK-RELATED INJURY AND DISEASE, THE
AUSTRALIAN PRODUCTIVITY COMMISSION( 4 ) ESTIMATES THAT
THESE COSTS ARE DISTRIBUTED IN SOCIETY AS FOLLOWS:

• Employers bear approximately 40% of costs, including workers’
compensation, loss of productivity and overtime.
• Injured workers bear approximately 30% of costs, including loss of
income, pain and suffering, loss of future earnings, and medical costs.
• The community bears approximately 30% of costs, including social
welfare payments, medical and health costs, and loss of human capital".

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#6 User is offline   ernie 

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Posted 08 November 2004 - 04:19 PM

And the NOHSAC recommendations:

THE BURDEN OF OCCUPATIONAL DISEASE AND INJURY IN NEW ZEALAND 19
As this report was being prepared, the Department of Labour was reorganised and OSH became part of its Workplace Group. However, OSH’s responsibility for occupational health and safety in New Zealand continues.
Our recommendations are therefore particularly relevant to the work of OSH or an equivalent agency, but we recognise they are also relevant to the work of a number of other government agencies including the Ministry of Health, ACC, the Environmental Risk Management Authority, the Land Transport Safety Authority and others.
OSH’s responsibilities include:
• influencing societal attitudes about the benefits of good workplace health and safety practice
• raising awareness of workplace participants’ rights and obligations under the Health and Safety in
Employment Act 1992 (“the HSE Act”)
• leading the development of national workplace health and safety initiatives across government and industry sectors and working collaboratively with industry sector organisations and other agencies to develop and promote workplace health and safety
• providing information and advice through the contact centre, website, presentations, seminars, consultations and workplace information visits to help individuals, workplaces and industry sectors understand the legislation and apply best practice health and safety
• assessing workplace health and safety performance and responding to and investigating notifications, complaints and incidents
• identifying breaches and taking appropriate compliance or enforcement action to reduce purposeful or serious breaches of minimum standards under the HSE Act.

In light of these responsibilities and the issues raised in this report, the Committee makes the following recommendations:

1. There should be a markedly increased focus on occupational health. Work-related cancer, respiratory disease, musculoskeletal disease and workplace fatigue should be particular priorities.

2. An increased emphasis on occupational health should not be at the expense of reducing current activities undertaken by OSH in relation to health and safety.

3. It is essential that a single central agency, such as OSH, takes the lead in, and ultimate responsibility for, occupational health and safety, rather than this task being handled by a variety of agencies for which occupational health and safety is a secondary responsibility.

4. The work of such an agency should involve an “all-of-government” approach, with the agency complementing rather than duplicating the work of other agencies such as the Ministry of Health and ACC, while taking ultimate responsibility for the “big picture” of occupational health and safety in New Zealand.

5. In particular, such an agency can be viewed as the occupational health equivalent of the Ministry of Health’s Public Health Directorate. The role of the Director of Public Health in the Ministry of Health is particularly interesting and relevant, and this could serve as a model for a position of Director of Occupational Health within OSH who would complement, and work closely with, the Director of Public Health.

6. OSH should have a greater proactive role in promoting occupational health as being in the interests of workers, employers and the country as a whole.

7. An emphasis on occupational health and the prevention of occupational disease requires significant involvement from occupational health specialists, including occupational medicine specialists, occupational health nurses, occupational hygienists and occupational epidemiologists, particularly at the head office level
and also at the district level. This in turn requires the development and support of appropriate training programmes to restore and revitalise the specialist occupational health workforce.

8. Agencies responsible for occupational health and safety should measure improvements in workplace practices as well as injury and disease rates.

9. A major emphasis should be given to the surveillance of occupational disease and injury so that we know how many work-related deaths and cases of work-related disease and injury happen in New Zealand each year.
This will be addressed in our next report, but some preliminary measures should be adopted at this stage.
Firstly, the current NODS should be preserved, improved and extended. Secondly, information on occupation should be routinely collected for deaths, cancer registrations and hospital admissions, and occupation should be incorporated as a field into the National Health Index (NHI) system. The NZHIS should then routinely code this information.

10. A concentrated effort must be made to reduce the toll of work-related deaths, as is currently done for deaths on the road.
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Posted 08 November 2004 - 10:13 PM

Poor Workplace Health "Unacceptable"
08/11/2004 06:20 PM
NewstalkZB

An independent study into workplace health and safety reports that work-related disease and injury is far higher than previously believed.

The report, released today by the National Occupational Health and Safety Advisory Committee, says that between 700 and 1000 people are dying each year from occupational disease.

The most common occupational diseases are cancer and respiratory disease while musculoskeletal disease and workplace fatigue are also areas of concern.

It suggests that ACC pay out for around 17,000 to 20,000 cases of work related disease and 200,000 work place related injuries a year.

Associate Labour Minister Ruth Dyson says the report shows the occupational diseases are killing and harming far more New Zealanders each year than occupational injuries, which number around 100 deaths per annum.

She says the figures in the report are based on overseas and New Zealand data, and that there is a lack of information about occupation health issues in this country.

Ms Dyson says that is unacceptable, and hopes the new report will be a starting point to gather the information needed to develop effective policies and practices for workplace health and safety.

She says she would like to see more occupational health practitioners employed in the field.

The report is available on the Internet at www.nohsac.govt.nz, under "reports".

http://xtramsn.co.nz...3841447,00.html
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Posted 09 November 2004 - 08:25 AM

Workplace disease highlighted
Industrial lawyer Hazel Armstrong says OSH needs to improve staffing and knowledge to combat work-related disease
9 November 2004

A lawyer is urging Occupational Safety and Health to take a more active approach in addressing workplace disease.

A report by the National Occupational Health and Safety Advisory Committee has found that up to 1,000 people die each year from occupation diseases such as heart disease, cancer and respiratory disease. Another 100 people die from workplace injury.

The incidence of work-related injury and disease is much higher than previously thought but it is difficult to know how big the problem is, because of a lack of data. Many conditions also do not emerge for many years.

Industrial lawyer Hazel Armstrong says most people have come to grips with physical hazards, but occupational disease is often unseen and not thought about.

She says OSH in particular will have to beef up its staffing and knowledge in the field of occupational disease and may have to consider reintroducing OSH doctors and nurses.
http://home.nzcity.c...lt.asp?id=44789
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Posted 09 November 2004 - 08:27 AM

Most work-related deaths not investigated, study finds

09.11.2004
By REBECCA WALSH

The scale of work-related injury and disease in New Zealand is much higher than previously thought but a lack of data makes it difficult to know how big the problem is.

A report by the National Occupational Health and Safety Advisory Committee says between 700 and 1000 people die each year from occupational diseases such as cancer, respiratory disease and ischaemic heart disease. Another 100 people die from workplace injury.

Exposure to workplace chemicals, fumes and dust along with work strain, including shift work are among the contributing factors. Often the disease develops years after the exposure.

The report, titled The Burden of Occupational Disease and Injury in New Zealand, says 17,000 to 20,000 cases of work-related disease such as musculoskeletal conditions (low back pain, for instance) skin disorders, chronic respiratory disease and ear problems emerge each year.

About 200,000 occupational accidents lead to successful ACC claims each year.

Committee chairman Professor Neil Pearce from Massey University's centre for public health research said work-related deaths and injuries cost between $4.3 billion and $8.7 billion a year.

But he said the Department of Labour and other government agencies did not know how many people died from work-related causes. More than 80 per cent of work-related deaths, most caused by disease rather than injury, were not documented, reported or investigated.

For example, each year 250 to 400 people died from occupational cancer and 320 to 750 cases were diagnosed. But the notifiable occupational disease system run by OSH reported only about 30 cases a year.

Professor Pearce said the report, the first of three the committee will produce, was based on a combination of overseas and local data.

More attention needed to be paid to occupational disease and injury, he said, and it was vital that one agency, such as OSH, take the lead and responsibility for the area.

Associate Labour Minister Ruth Dyson said the Government had already begun to address some of the recommendations.

Occupational diseases such as cancer, fatigue and respiratory disease were targeted in OSH's business plan and the Government's draft Workplace Health and Safety Strategy for New Zealand to 2015.

Ross Wilson, president of the Council of Trade Unions, said the report revealed the "shockingly high toll" of decades of neglect in workplaces.

A taskforce was needed to identify the action needed to "stem this developing epidemic".

The National Occupational Health and Safety Advisory Committee was set up last year to provide independent advice to the Minister of Labour on occupational health and safety issues.

Death at work

* Each year 700 to 1000 people die from occupational disease, particularly cancer, respiratory disease and ischaemic heart disease.

* About 100 people die from occupational injury, including traffic accidents, machinery-related accidents and being struck by falling objects.

* There are 17,000 to 20,000 new cases of work-related disease, including musculoskeletal conditions, skin disorders and chronic respiratory disease.

* Work-related deaths and injuries cost $4.3 billion to $8.7 billion a year.

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/storydisplay.cfm...section=general
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Posted 09 November 2004 - 09:47 AM

Loosen rules on workplace compensation
Tuesday, 9 November 2004, 9:56 am
Press Release: Engineering Printing and Manufacturing Union


November 8, 2004

Loosen rules on workplace compensation

The Government must consider loosening the rules around compensation for workplace accidents and illnesses in the wake of a report that shows some 1000 New Zealanders a year die of work-related conditions, says the country’s largest union.

Engineering, Printing and Manufacturing Union national secretary Andrew Little said that the report, by the National Occupational Health and Safety Advisory Committee released today, showed just how bad New Zealand’s workplace health and safety record was.

“The Government must address this problem seriously and urgently,” he said.

“We have hundreds of our members and former members dying of diseases like asbestosis and solvent-induced neurotoxicity, and the way they have been treated is appalling.

“Because many of these conditions take years to develop, it is difficult, if not impossible, to prove exactly when and where they were contracted. Often, innocent, hard-working people suffer and even die without any official acknowledgement of what has been done to them, let alone apology or compensation.

“In determining whether compensation is payable, we might just have to accept that diagnoses have to be proven on likelihoods rather than certainties.”

http://www.scoop.co....0411/S00074.htm



evidence exists where the ACC have ignored safety data sheets and chemicals information placed on claimants files - infact - a comprehensive look at the known chemicals exposed to has not been looked at by acc at all - their reports do not look at the actual chemical or the chemical mixture. Guess which acc advertised company sells this chemical mixture?
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Posted 09 November 2004 - 11:51 AM

Shock Hidden Death Toll Requires Decisive Action
Tuesday, 9 November 2004, 11:17 am
Press Release: Engineering Printing and Manufacturing Union

08 November 2004

Shock Hidden Death Toll Requires Decisive Action

A new health and safety report revealed the shockingly high toll of decades of neglect in New Zealand workplaces and decisive action was required, Council of Trade Unions president Ross Wilson said today.

The first report of the National Occupational Health and Safety Advisory Committee released today revealed that up to 1,000 workers died every year from occupational disease - up to 10 times more than died from accidents.

“This long-overdue research points to an occupational disease epidemic caused by poor workplace health protection over many decades,” Ross Wilson said.

“It is nothing less than a scandal that thousands of workers are dying because new toxic substances have been introduced into workplaces without proper protection.”

The CTU commended the Government for commissioning this report. “A taskforce is now required to identify the urgent action necessary to stem this developing epidemic,” Ross Wilson said.

http://www.scoop.co....0411/S00080.htm

Quote

The CTU commended the Government for commissioning this report. “A taskforce is now required to identify the urgent action necessary to stem this developing epidemic,” Ross Wilson said.


identify the urgent action necessary
= investigate ACC and their negative influence!!!!
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#12 Guest_IDB_*

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  Posted 09 November 2004 - 10:30 PM

Remember too, that a wee while ago the report "Aftermath" was also released,
it was a study on the effects o injury on the person.

get a copy here:

AFTERMATH

How the lives of fifteen ordinary
New Zealanders have been affected by
workplace injury and illness

and

The Social and Economic Consequences of
Workplace Injury and Illness

get a copy here:
http://www.accforum....p?showtopic=199
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#13 Guest_Iw2_*

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Posted 23 August 2005 - 11:41 AM

Before reading this, read the Snftaas site and the Aussie F111 site:
http://www.ncchem.com/snftaas/
http://www.gooptroop.com/gtroop/


imho - With the predicted New Asbestos Epidemic slowly appearing to be true,it seems those in Government would rather still pretend the occupational
exposures and consequences of still do not exist in reality to avoid
properly addressing ownership of liability and what still appears to be
the active processes to minimise recognition and compensation for
damage from exposures,

The first step in doing this is to ensure the general medical community have either little knowledge or a negatively biased view towards occupational exposures. This means incorrect diagnosis, lack of appropriate medical treatment, hidden injury statistics being mis-represented by way of faulty processes - its all part of avoiding admitting there is a big global problem of occupational exposure and disease.

All this and more means the acc processes can still actively negatively discriminate exposed /diseased/injured workers feeding an endless gravy train of bureaucracy, hiding and potentially amplifying a problem instead of openly admitting and accepting there is a problem.





The NOHSAC Report 2004 - http://www.nohsac.govt.nz/

The Burdon of Occupational Disease and Injury in New Zealand, Technical Report, published by National Occupational Health and Safety Advisory Committee NOHSAC - click on the report then go to:
-------------------------------------------------------

CHRONIC SOLVENT-INDUCED TOXIC ENCEPHALOPATHY
http://www.nohsac.govt.nz/bodi/index.php?s...n=sec3:s4:p078: (no mention of the role of xray and hospital theatre chemicals despite a number of cases accepted by ACC)

--------------------------------------------------------

For depressing reading on MCS (no mention of xray or theatre chemicals despite the Inquiry):
http://www.nohsac.govt.nz/bodi/index.php?s...3:s15:p110:#top
3.15 MULTIPLE CHEMICAL SENSITIVITY

Introduction | Exposures | New Zealand studies of risk | New Zealand exposures

Summary Multiple chemical sensitivity is a syndrome characterised by an abnormal, multi-organ sensitivity following chemical exposures. There is lack of agreement as to what the underlying pathological mechanisms are and whether multiple chemical sensitivity should be viewed as a separate clinical entity. There are no occupational exposures clearly related to the development of multiple chemical sensitivity. Occupational exposures reported to precipitate typical symptoms in persons who are said to be chemically sensitive include adhesives, industrial air contaminants, fumigants, photocopy toner, smoke, soldering fumes, solvents, sulphur residues, utility gas and paint vapour. There are no New Zealand studies of multiple chemical sensitivity in relation to work. All the implicated exposures occur in the New Zealand workforce.

Introduction

Multiple chemical sensitivity is a syndrome characterised by an abnormal, multi-organ sensitivity following chemical exposures. There is lack of agreement as to what the underlying pathological mechanisms are and whether multiple chemical sensitivity should be viewed as a separate clinical entity. However, there are diagnostic criteria that are generally accepted442, 443, 444, 445.

Exposures

There are no occupational exposures clearly related to the development of multiple chemical sensitivity. Occupational exposures reported to precipitate typical symptoms in persons who are said to be chemically sensitive include adhesives, industrial air contaminants, fumigants, photocopy toner, smoke, soldering fumes, solvents, sulphur residues, utility gas and paint vapour442, 444, 445.
New Zealand Studies of risk

There are no New Zealand studies of multiple chemical sensitivity in relation to work.
New Zealand exposures

There are no occupational exposures clearly related to the development or exacerbation of multiple chemical sensitivity. However, all the implicated exposures occur in the New Zealand workforce.

--------------------------------------------------------

3.13 CHEMICAL POISONING/TOXICITY (at least mentions xray chemicals though not theatre chemicals)

http://www.nohsac.govt.nz/bodi/index.php?s...=sec3:s13:p105:

Summary Work-related acute and chronic poisoning covers a range of disorders characterised by systemic abnormalities of metabolic processes due to contact with one or more industrial chemicals. There is a wide range of workplace chemicals that can cause abnormalities in metabolic processes. They include heavy metals such as lead, cadmium and mercury; organic solvents such as toluene, styrene and n-hexane; pesticides and herbicides; and gases such as carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, sulphur dioxide, methane, methylene chloride and formaldehyde. Exposures occur in a wide variety of circumstances, including welding, metal degreasing, dry cleaning, pesticide use, mobile equipment operation, and many aspects of manufacturing and construction. Data on work-related poisoning in New Zealand studies come from routine published data, specific studies and case reports. From March 1992 to June 1998, 154 confirmed cases of "occupational disease due to chemical exposure" were reported to NODS, with the main substances involved being "chemicals in hospital X-ray departments", lead, "chemical fumes" and solvents. From 1990 to 1998, there were 5,340 calls to the New Zealand Poisons Centre for work-related poisoning, with the main chemicals involved being agricultural chemicals. The main relevant exposure information available for the New Zealand workforce concerns lead. A wide range of the New Zealand workforce is potentially exposed to hazardous chemicals.

Introduction

Work-related acute and chronic poisoning covers a range of disorders characterised by systemic abnormalities of metabolic processes due to contact with one or more industrial chemicals. The abnormalities may affect any body system, but most commonly affect the respiratory, nervous or cardiovascular systems. Most of the chronic effects are considered in other sections (e.g. asthma and chronic solvent-induced encephalopathy). This section focuses on acute or short-term chemical-related problems and the exposures leading to them. It also considers the systemic problems arising from exposure to metals.

Exposures

There is a wide range of workplace chemicals that can cause abnormalities in metabolic processes. A detailed description is beyond the scope of this document, but most of the key exposures are mentioned here. They include heavy metals such as lead, cadmium and mercury; organic solvents such as toluene, styrene and n-hexane; pesticides and herbicides; and gases such as carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, sulphur dioxide, methane, methylene chloride and formaldehyde. Exposures occur in a wide variety of circumstances, including welding, metal degreasing, dry cleaning, pesticide use, mobile equipment operation, and many aspects of manufacturing and construction416, 417.

New Zealand Studies of risk

In the first six years of operation of NODS (March 1992 to June 1998), 542 cases of "occupational disease due to chemical exposure" were notified, of which 154 were confirmed as being work related. The main substances involved were "chemicals in hospital X-ray departments", lead, "chemical fumes" and solvents (Table 3.32). The primary cause of lead poisoning was paint stripping, with radiator repair work and foundry work the next most common16.


more @....... http://www.nohsac.govt.nz/
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