ACCforum: Workplace injury inquiries drop - ACCforum

Jump to content

Page 1 of 1
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

Workplace injury inquiries drop Corporate Manslaughter

#1 User is offline   hukildaspida 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Member
  • Posts: 3353
  • Joined: 24-August 07

Posted 02 January 2013 - 10:29 PM

http://www.stuff.co....-inquiries-drop

Workplace injury inquiries drop
NICOLA BRENNAN-TUPARA
Last updated 09:37 27/12/2012

Just two Waikato businesses have been hauled through the courts in the last two years after their employees were injured, despite the region having an appalling record for workplace accidents.

Less than half of the 590 accidents reported to the Department of Labour - which became part of the Ministry of Business, Innovation & Employment in July - in the 2011/2012 year were investigated,
figures released to the Waikato Times show.

Figures show a 23 per cent drop in investigations on the previous year when 72 per cent of cases were investigated.

The ministry's regional manager Ona de Rooy told the Times an increased focus on going out and educating and engaging workplaces about the risks had contributed to the drop.

"There's a balance for us," she said. "If we want workplace behaviour to change and stay changed, [workplaces] need to understand the risks and what safe looks like. It's about a balance because it's also clear that we have an enforcement role."

The Waikato is over-represented when it comes to workplace accidents, contributing to 14 per cent of all workplace deaths, and 9 per cent of serious harm accidents, nationally.

These statistics, and the Pike River mine tragedy of 2010, have led to calls for a charge of corporate manslaughter to be brought in - but Ms de Rooy would not comment on whether she thought that would help reduce the deaths.

She did say things needed to change.

"The reality is we've got too many New Zealanders dying or being seriously harmed while they're at work and not going home to their families."

The issue of corporate manslaughter is being looked at by the Independent Taskforce on Workplace Health and Safety, set up in June 2012 to complete a comprehensive review of New Zealand's health and safety system.


It will provide recommendations - including whether corporate manslaughter should be bought in - to the Government by the end of April 2013.

Chairman Rob Jager told the Times it was "certainly on our radar screen", but it had only recently started being used in other countries, like Canada and Australia, so it was not yet clear how successful it had been.

"But there is some anecdotal evidence that the risk of corporate manslaughter appears to have an impact on how some managers view their responsibilities."

Mr Jager said New Zealand had an "abysmal" and "unacceptable" record of workplace deaths and accidents, but there was no easy fix.


- © Fairfax NZ News
0

#2 User is offline   tas 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 60
  • Joined: 10-July 11

Posted 03 January 2013 - 06:03 PM

View Posthukildaspida, on 02 January 2013 - 10:29 PM, said:

http://www.stuff.co....-inquiries-drop

Workplace injury inquiries drop
NICOLA BRENNAN-TUPARA
Last updated 09:37 27/12/2012

Just two Waikato businesses have been hauled through the courts in the last two years after their employees were injured, despite the region having an appalling record for workplace accidents.

Less than half of the 590 accidents reported to the Department of Labour - which became part of the Ministry of Business, Innovation & Employment in July - in the 2011/2012 year were investigated,
figures released to the Waikato Times show.

Figures show a 23 per cent drop in investigations on the previous year when 72 per cent of cases were investigated.

The ministry's regional manager Ona de Rooy told the Times an increased focus on going out and educating and engaging workplaces about the risks had contributed to the drop.

"There's a balance for us," she said. "If we want workplace behaviour to change and stay changed, [workplaces] need to understand the risks and what safe looks like. It's about a balance because it's also clear that we have an enforcement role."

The Waikato is over-represented when it comes to workplace accidents, contributing to 14 per cent of all workplace deaths, and 9 per cent of serious harm accidents, nationally.

These statistics, and the Pike River mine tragedy of 2010, have led to calls for a charge of corporate manslaughter to be brought in - but Ms de Rooy would not comment on whether she thought that would help reduce the deaths.

She did say things needed to change.

"The reality is we've got too many New Zealanders dying or being seriously harmed while they're at work and not going home to their families."

The issue of corporate manslaughter is being looked at by the Independent Taskforce on Workplace Health and Safety, set up in June 2012 to complete a comprehensive review of New Zealand's health and safety system.


It will provide recommendations - including whether corporate manslaughter should be bought in - to the Government by the end of April 2013.

Chairman Rob Jager told the Times it was "certainly on our radar screen", but it had only recently started being used in other countries, like Canada and Australia, so it was not yet clear how successful it had been.

"But there is some anecdotal evidence that the risk of corporate manslaughter appears to have an impact on how some managers view their responsibilities."

Mr Jager said New Zealand had an "abysmal" and "unacceptable" record of workplace deaths and accidents, but there was no easy fix.


- © Fairfax NZ News
Its quite simple, the big companies are telling the employees to make sure the work related accident happened at home. They then get them to come in on light duties. This could mean sitting in the smoko hut under the eyes of peers who resent these workers seemingly having an easy ride. They then feel duty bound to sign themselves fit to work. Have heard Safety Officers being told to look the other way if they wish to stay employed. It took at least six months for my complaint to DOL to be answered and then there is only one person in the whole of NZ assigned to deal with Mining accidents.Some boys don't even get issued safety gear unless the site has visitors. Then they have to give it back afterwards.The real amount of accidents will never be disclosed, if they were some of these big companies would be run out of the country.
0

Share this topic:


Page 1 of 1
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

1 User(s) are reading this topic
0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users