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Fears of football injury timebomb across all codes

#1 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 24 September 2012 - 02:05 PM

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Fears of football injury timebomb across all codes

STATE of Origin great Willie Carne says football has become so dangerous that he does not want his children to risk the massive head injuries he suffered.

As the sporting spotlight falls on the NRL and AFL finals, doctors are warning head knocks could have long-term health implications.

Carne, who was knocked out a dozen times and now suffers short-term memory loss, says he would prefer his two young sons play golf.

His concerns are backed by former Broncos teammate and Australian captain Darren Lockyer, who is calling for the banning of the shoulder charge and the introduction of independent doctors to monitor concussed players.

Their comments come as more than 3000 former gridiron players in the US have joined a class action lawsuit against the NFL over football-related head traumas

Carne, 43, once regarded as the world's best rugby league winger, lined up for the Broncos 136 times and starred in 12 Origin battles and 10 Tests for Australia.
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#2 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 11:00 PM

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Will Brain Injury Lawsuits Doom or Save the NFL?
By Paul M. Barrett on January 31, 2013

http://www.businessw...or-save-the-nfl

http://www.businessw...or-save-the-nfl

When Gene Locks led Princeton against Columbia on Oct. 7, 1957, it took the Tigers quarterback only a few plays to discover “that the middle of the Columbia line was paper thin,” according to the Daily Princetonian. In the Tigers’ single-wing offense, Locks served as a blocker, leaving “gaping holes” in Columbia’s defense on the way to a 47-6 wipeout.

Fifty-six years later, a grayer, wider Locks sits in his Philadelphia law office behind piles of client files. Black-and-white gridiron photos of his svelte younger self look down from a shelf. In the 1970s he brought some of the first lawsuits on behalf of pipe fitters exposed to asbestos insulation. His firm eventually represented more than 16,000 asbestos clients in 20 states. In the late 1990s he helped lead the Fen-Phen diet drug litigation, which culminated in a $6 billion settlement. Now 75, Locks has earned a fortune in fees. In 2011 he had planned to spend more time with his grandchildren. “Then these concussion cases started coming in,” he says. “I remember what it’s like to get your bell rung.”

Even as an expected 110 million Americans take to their couches for the 47th Super Bowl on Feb. 3, Locks is waging a legal battle that represents the most serious threat to the viability of big-time football since an outbreak of fatal skull fractures back in the leather-helmet days. Locks and a group of allied plaintiffs’ lawyers are suing the National Football League on behalf of more than 4,000 former players and their wives who accuse the $9.5 billion-a-year business of covering up life-altering brain injuries.
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