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Fit for Work Musculoskeletal Disorders and the New Zealand Labour Market Report - August 2012

#1 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 10 September 2012 - 02:55 PM

http://www.physiothe...w&Story_id=3462

Physios welcome Fit for Work Report

Back to Industry News

Physiotherapy New Zealand is welcoming a new report entitled Fit for Work, that calls for a focus on early detection and intervention for the one in four New Zealanders suffering from musculoskeletal disorders, to ensure they can continue working.

The report says musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) such as arthritis, cost the country more than $5.5 billion each year. They are also the leading cause of disability and are the second largest category of conditions resulting in sickness and invalid benefits.

“We fully support this report’s call for early detection, intervention and the referral to appropriate care, such as physiotherapists and occupational therapists,” says Physiotherapy New Zealand President Gill Stotter.

“As physios we work to identify issues and risk factors and then help people return to their normal activities, including working, as soon as possible. Our role is to educate people on what can be done to help as often we can alleviate people’s fears through education and understanding.”

“The longer people are away from work the harder it is for them to return, this is why we need to offer help and support as early as possible.”

“We also refer on to other health professionals when appropriate. The number of people with MSDs is predicted to soar, so it is vital that we work together as a healthcare team that is patient focused.”

Ms Stotter says the report highlights the financial impact on the country and the need for cost effective treatment.

The report notes that MSDs comprise over 25% of total annual health costs.

“Research has shown physiotherapy is a cost-effective option for MSDs, it can help reduce the amount of medication needed, the time of work, and the need for hospital admissions.”

Ms Stotter says Physiotherapy New Zealand agrees with the report on the need for a National Action Plan to raise awareness about the impact of these conditions and for a collaborative approach to manage MSDs.

The impact of MSDs on the New Zealand Workforce[1]

MSDs affect nearly 1 in 4 adults in New Zealand.
In 2010 15.2% of New Zealanders aged 15 and over were living with at least one type of arthritis. By 2020 the prevalence of arthritis is expected to reach 16.9%, which is equivalent to 120,000 people. Rheumatoid Arthritis is the second most common form of arthritis in New Zealand, affecting 3.5% of the population. In 2008 this was equivalent to more than 149,000 people.
The odds of participating in the labour force in New Zealand are 31.5% lower for those people with a chronic condition, such an MSD. In 2005, for example, 25,440 people were not participating in the labour market because of their arthritis.
In 2009/2010 the Accident Compensation Corporation of New Zealand (ACC) spent NZ$147,452,564 on work-related musculoskeletal entitlement claims.
At the end of 2010 14.5% of all accepted claims for sickness benefit and 11.7% of all accepted claims for invalid’s benefit were for MSDs.
Behind psychological and psychiatric conditions, MSDs represented the second largest category of conditions resulting in claims for sickness benefit.
The direct cost of work-related injuries and disease (which are thought to be largely made up of MSDs) to the New Zealand economy was between 4 and 8% of GDP in 2002.

The report was commissioned by healthcare firm Abbott Laboratories and carried out by researchers at Britain’s Lancaster University.

[1] Reference

Released today: Fit for Work? Musculoskeletal Disorders and the New Zealand Labour Market.

Download the full report here

Fit for work - Musculoskeletal Disorders and the New Zealand Labour Market report August 2012 - The Work Foundation part of Britain's Lancaster University

http://www.physiothe...gust%202012.pdf

Stephen Bevan
Natalie Gunning
Rosemary Thomas
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#2 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 10 September 2012 - 02:57 PM

http://www.bayofplen...-costs/1537724/

Illnesses push up health and ACC costs

Kiri Gillespie | Monday, September 10, 2012 8:18

Musculoskeletal disorders cost taxpayers an estimated $5.57 billion a year and the number of sufferers is set to balloon over the next eight years, says a report into the economic cost of the debilitating diseases.

Musculoskeletal disorders cost taxpayers an estimated $5.57 billion a year and the number of sufferers is set to balloon over the next eight years, says a report into the economic cost of the debilitating diseases.
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Musculoskeletal disorders cost taxpayers an estimated $5.57 billion a year and the number of sufferers is set to balloon over the next eight years, says a report into the economic cost of the debilitating diseases.

More than 650,000 New Zealanders over the age of 15 are expected to be living with at least one type of arthritis by 2020, the Fit for Work report states.

In 2010, 14.5 per cent of sickness benefit claims and 11.7 per cent of invalid benefit claims were for musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs).

There are more than 170 different types of MSD, including arthritis.

They are the single greatest cause of disability in New Zealand, with one in six people affected.

As the Western Bay's ageing population grows, so does the number of people affected locally. Chris Polaczuk, programme manager for the Accident Compensation Corporation's musculoskeletal injury prevention programme, said MSDs in the workplace cost ACC more than $140 million annually.

Arthritis New Zealand chief executive Sandra Kirby said the report was well timed, due to recent discussions about keeping people in work and encouraging those on benefits to return to the workforce.

"It is a holistic look into a significant national health issue with a wider reaching impact on society."

Ms Kirby said the report illustrated a need to focus on early detection of MSDs to improve outcomes. "The best outcomes will have people with arthritis and other MSDs being able to stay in work or have the earliest possible return to work." Kiri Gillespie
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#3 User is offline   unit1of2 

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Posted 10 September 2012 - 04:27 PM

People have and do work with Arthritic conditions and have done for many many years. It is only when the Arthritis eventually takes over the persons pain threshold and abilities that the issues become really a problem. WE ALREADY KNOW THIS.. What I'm interested in is HOW they magically think they have sudden answers to these peoples ARTHRITIC debilitating issues???

I also wonder at the sudden 'Ballooning' of ARTHRITIC problem cases??? where do these suddenly balloon from???

It is already fact that some naturally occurring Arthritic changes with ages 'do not in fact necessarily cause pain issues or disabilities'...not until it gets progressively out of hand.

With injuries to bone and discs, there is an immediate response to changes and arthritic type changes accur and progress over time...we all know this, it's not rocket science. Also not all these changes cause pain, well not until again when the changes are progressive and aggressive.

Some arthritic changes that really are hard to detect on xrays won't necessarily be the cause of pain, there will be underlying issues else where.

Compression of bone and discs cause aches and pains. Discs have types of nerves, and when broken, damaged etc cause pain. It's in medical journal....

Injuries of soft tissue, ligaments, spines and nerve types are not all known, I was told by a Professor. They do not have all the answers to alot of peoples issues, YET the medical relms do know that these issues for people exist. Living examples cannot be put on the slab to dissect, and unfortunately by the time the medical folk have finished with you, you'd have to disposed of..buried or what-ever. There are some Medical Specialists out there playing GOD/s thinking they have all the answers to some patients spinal issues, they continue to do do surgeries and are going in blinded by their own agenda's. They then cause more harm than good... end.
Well that was enlightening I thought. I won't forget what he said... He's retired now.

Some muscular and skeletal conditions/complaints are from TBI issues. So when folk have multiple injuries including TBI and Torso (muscular and skeletal), these issues can be hard to define for some folk in the medical profession. Because they don't have all the answers...
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