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Pfizer New Zealand Health Report: Chronic Pain Pfizer New Zealand Health Report: Chronic Pain – 9/5/2012

#1 User is offline   Mark 

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Posted 10 May 2012 - 09:45 PM

Pfizer New Zealand Health Report: Chronic Pain – in partnership with Arthritis New Zealand - 9/5/2012
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#2 User is offline   ACC loser 

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Posted 11 May 2012 - 11:06 AM

View PostMark, on 10 May 2012 - 09:45 PM, said:


Great report to read . Now all we have to do to find Doctors who know what it means !
Just like my doctor who says O just take a pill and get over it !!

A bit like ACC !
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#3 User is offline   not their victim 

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Posted 11 May 2012 - 01:51 PM

and we all know that the medical definition of chronic pain

is very different from the acc version of chronic pain!

and, for a drug company to commission the report???
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#4 User is offline   Bazil Fawlty 

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Posted 11 May 2012 - 07:59 PM

View Postnot their victim, on 11 May 2012 - 01:51 PM, said:

and we all know that the medical definition of chronic pain

is very different from the acc version of chronic pain!

and, for a drug company to commission the report???

It sounds like something ACC would commission a report on, as opposed to a drug company??
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#5 User is offline   not their victim 

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Posted 12 May 2012 - 10:17 AM

the drug company will be out to prove that their drugs keep the "chronic pain" under control

Im not saying they dont...

I just find it interesting when drug companies produce research into certain subjects, to back up the need for whatever specific drug needs a push on the open market...

is abit like the cheap replacement drug i am on, instead of the SR that was more expensive....

the cheap one tastes like the smell of petrol, and i knew exactly when the batch of drugs were brought into the country as i was able to identify this with the pharmacist...
he was stunned that i could tell the date from the taste of the capsules!!!!

I even offered to send some of the meds to the DSIR to see if they contain what they are supposed to...
unfortunately, I had poppoed the caps into a small container that goes into a travel bag, so i didnt have the ID on the end of the "drug sleeve"....grrrrr lol
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#6 User is offline   not their victim 

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Posted 21 May 2012 - 11:59 AM




Nowhere do costs grow faster than in the health sector. Each year pharmaceutical companies produce new drugs, technology companies invent new machines and the demand for skilled doctors and nurses continues to outstrip the supply.

The Government's decision to increase prescription chargesacknowledges that reality.

Despite the protestations of some politicians who should know better, there is not a magical bucket of money tucked away in some dark recess of the Beehive that is constantly replenishing itself. Money spent by ministers on one thing is money that cannot be spent on another.

As a nation, New Zealand can only buy what it can afford to pay for or borrow what it can convince its creditors it is good for. Both are finite equations.

Health Minister Tony Ryall's Labour predecessors were somewhat insulated from economic reality by the flood of money that poured into the government's coffers in the early part of this century. Each year finance minister Michael Cullen would declare that the government could not keep increasing health spending at twice the rate of inflation and each year Labour's health ministers would prevail upon him to do just that. Mr Ryall does not have that luxury.

With the Government promising a "zero budget'' next week the choice for him was simple: ask people to pay slightly more for prescription medicines or tell patients needing cancer treatment and elective surgery to wait longer. He has chosen to ask families to pay up to $40 more a year for medicine. Few, apart from those who like to pretend the Government has a limitless supply of money, will disagree with that choice.

The increase, which takes effect next January, will push the price of a single item up from $3 to $5. For a family the maximum payable in a single year will increase from $60 to $100.

Prescriptions for children under the age of six will remain free and families that cannot afford to pay the increase will be able to obtain assistance from Work and Income NZ and primary health organisations. According to Pharmacy Guild president Karen Crisp, that means that no patient need be denied medicine by cost.

Historically and internationally the charges are still low. Until the Labour-led government cut the fees between 2004 and 2008, the charge for prescription medicines was $15. In Australia the average fee is A$35.40 (NZ$45), although those on low incomes pay a lesser fee. In England the average charge is NZ$16 and in Finland, Labour's utopia, Mr Ryall says individuals have to fork out $1107 each before the cost of prescription medicines is limited to about NZ$2.50.








http://www.stuff.co....ription-charges
By any standard New Zealand's fees are reasonable. No one should be denied medical assistance by cost. Prompt treatment of many conditions is in the interests of society as well as individuals. It can stop the spread of disease and avoid the need for costly hospital treatment.

However, pharmaceutical costs are real. A balance has to be struck between prevention and cure. The question being asked should not be whether the minister has gone too far but whether he has gone far enough.










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#7 User is offline   Gloria Mitchell 

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Posted 21 May 2012 - 02:12 PM

View PostMark, on 10 May 2012 - 09:45 PM, said:


Oops.....one of the two links on this thread relate to research in Italy....where they report that Vitamin C taken after orthopedic surgery helps to ensure no regional chronic pain results from the surgery....or something like that. That would have been helpful to know for my orthopedic surgeries. Spread that one around folks.

GLoria.
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#8 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 07 June 2012 - 06:26 PM

Vitamin C & chronic pain articles and research

http://scholar.googl...ved=0CAcQgQMwAA


RESEARCH NOTE BELIEF IN THE EFFICACY OF ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE AMONG GENERAL PRACTITIONERS IN THE NETHERLANDS
http://www.mv.helsin...schild_1990.pdf


http://jbjs.org/arti...me=89&page=1424

Can Vitamin C Prevent Complex Regional Pain Syndrome in Patients with Wrist Fractures?: A Randomized, Controlled, Multicenter Dose-Response Study
P.E. Zollinger, MD1; W.E. Tuinebreijer, MD, PhD, MSc, MA2; R.S. Breederveld, MD, PhD3; R.W. Kreis, MD, PhD3
1 Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Ziekenhuis Rivierenland, President Kennedylaan 1, 4002 WP Tiel, The Netherlands. E-mail address: [email protected]
2 Relweg 59, 1949 EC Wijk aan Zee, The Netherlands
3 Departments of Surgery (R.S.B., R.W.K.) and Burn Wounds (R.W.K.), Red Cross Hospital, Vondellaan 13, 1942 LE Beverwijk, The Netherlands
The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. 2007; 89:1424-1431 doi:10.2106/JBJS.F.01147
Article
Comments (4)
text A A A
Abstract

Background: Complex regional pain syndrome type I is treated symptomatically. A protective effect of vitamin C (ascorbic acid) has been reported previously. A dose-response study was designed to evaluate its effect in patients with wrist fractures.

Methods: In a double-blind, prospective, multicenter trial, 416 patients with 427 wrist fractures were randomly allocated to treatment with placebo or treatment with 200, 500, or 1500 mg of vitamin C daily for fifty days. The effect of gender, age, fracture type, and cast-related complaints on the occurrence of complex regional pain syndrome was analyzed.

Results: Three hundred and seventeen patients with 328 fractures were randomized to receive vitamin C, and ninety-nine patients with ninety-nine fractures were randomized to receive a placebo. The prevalence of complex regional pain syndrome was 2.4% (eight of 328) in the vitamin C group and 10.1% (ten of ninety-nine) in the placebo group (p = 0.002); all of the affected patients were elderly women. Analysis of the different doses of vitamin C showed that the prevalence of complex regional pain syndrome was 4.2% (four of ninety-six) in the 200-mg group (relative risk, 0.41; 95% confidence interval, 0.13 to 1.27), 1.8% (two of 114) in the 500-mg group (relative risk, 0.17; 95% confidence interval, 0.04 to 0.77), and 1.7% (two of 118) in the 1500-mg group (relative risk, 0.17; 95% confidence interval, 0.04 to 0.75). Early cast-related complaints predicted the development of complex regional pain syndrome (relative risk, 5.35; 95% confidence interval, 2.13 to 13.42).

Conclusions: Vitamin C reduces the prevalence of complex regional pain syndrome after wrist fractures. A daily dose of 500 mg for fifty days is recommended.

Level of Evidence: Therapeutic Level I. See Instructions to Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.
Topics
fracture ; complex regional pain syndromes ; ascorbic acid ; carpal bone fractures

http://www.rsdcanada...vanderlaan.html

Recently, conclusive evidence that RSD/CRPS starts as "neurogenic inflammation" has been added to the already gigantic stack of previous research on this matter. To explain the "inflammatory theory" see DMSO/NAC and FREE RADICALS section below. Dr Huygen's work on inflammation is irrefutable proof of inflammation as the cause for RSD/CRPS. This is excellent progress.

http://crps-rsd-a-be...01_archive.html

Sunday, January 22, 2012
More about Free Radicals are possible mediators of mechanisms leading to some of the neurological symptoms of CRPS/RSD.
First suggested by Sudeck in 1942, Dutch researchers' studies supported the theory that oxygen derived free radicals are possibly the mediators of mechanisms leading to some of the neurological symptoms of CRPS. They found

high oxygen supply with tissue hypoxia in CRPS extremities;
a diminished oxygen availability to the skeletal muscle tissue affected by chronic CRPS;
and several deficiencies in the skeletal muscles of CRPS sufferers.

Studies in Holland have centered around free radical scavengers as treatment for CRPS. There are many ongoing studies with DMSO, NAC in Holland.

At first Sudeck's work was questioned as CRPS was generally thought to have more been generated by an overactive sympathetic nervous system. results of studies by Van der Laan and Goris, "Sudeck's syndrome. Was Sudeck right?" support his theory. This pdf is worth reading by the same authors. Clinical signs and symptoms of acute reflex sympathetic dystrophy in one hind limb of the rat, induced by fusion with a free-radical donor.
This website P.A.R.C. has great information about Dutch Research.

Free radicals are atoms or groups of atoms with an odd number of electrons and can be formed when oxygen interacts with certain molecules. Once formed these highly reactive radicals can start a chain reaction. Their chief danger comes from the damage they can do when they react with important cellular components such as DNA, or the cell membrane. To prevent free radical damage the body has a defense system of antioxidants.
Antioxidants are molecules which can safely interact with free radicals and terminate the chain reaction before vital molecules are damaged. Although there are several enzyme systems within the body that scavenge free radicals, the principle micro nutrient (vitamin) antioxidants are vitamin E, beta-carotene, and vitamin C. Additionally, selenium, a trace metal that is required for proper function of one of the body's antioxidant enzyme systems, is sometimes included in this category. The body cannot manufacture these micro nutrients so they must be supplied in the diet.
Vitamin E : nuts, seeds, vegetable and fish oils, whole grains (esp. wheat germ), fortified cereals, and apricots.
Vitamin C : Ascorbic acid is a water soluble vitamin present in citrus fruits and juices, green peppers, cabbage, spinach, broccoli, kale, cantaloupe, kiwi, and strawberries.
Beta-carotene is a precursor to vitamin A (retinol) and is present in liver, egg yolk, milk, butter, spinach, carrots, squash, broccoli, yams, tomato, cantaloupe, peaches, and grains. (NOTE: Vitamin A has no antioxidant properties and can be quite toxic when taken in excess.)
Research now shows that we can substantially affect the level of anti-oxidants in our bodies by eating fresh fruits and vegetables.

Google "antioxidants for crps" to learn more.

This is where my eating smart comes into it.
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#9 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 07 June 2012 - 06:29 PM

http://www.nzherald....jectid=10807006

Health industry depends on people being ill
By Paul Little
5:30 AM Sunday May 20, 2012

In this year's Budget, Health Minister Tony Ryall told us, health receives a big funding boost, "which will come from savings within health and across the Government's accounts".

Surely boosting funding by cutting funding is an economic miracle of world-beating magnitude. Such noted economists as Lewis Carroll and Spike Milligan would be proud to claim authorship of such an initiative.

Let's be clear - if John Key's Government takes money from one part of something to spend it on another part, it's not actually a boost. It's a redistribution.

Part of the "boost" will also come from an increase in prescription costs. This has been structured so that no individual or family will pay more than 80c a week extra. Even the most diehard propagandist will struggle to portray this as a burden on the poor, although I'm sure the usual suspects will try.

What is concerning is not the increased amount people will pay but the way in which it is being spent.

The money will be used for cancer treatment, to cut waiting times for elective surgery and diagnostic tests, and to help set up a national register of heart patients. Worthy measures all, but only the last could be said to be contributing to the most effective and economically efficient public health strategy - prevention.

It's cheaper and more effective to treat causes than it is to treat the conditions that result. It's easier to insulate homes cheaply so that children do not get sick in winter with Third World diseases that require expensive hospital treatment. It's cheaper to pay for condoms than for expensive Aids drugs.

There is evidence for big long-term savings as a result of simple, cheap measures wherever you look. Dutch research, for example, has shown that vitamin C taken after orthopaedic surgery prevents the development of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome - a condition that is expansive and difficult to treat once it has developed.

Two of the most worrying and increasingly prevalent health problems - heart disease and diabetes - are also among the easiest to prevent with a few simple lifestyle changes (Fewer pies!). But there is so much more that could be done, including measures that would not just cut costs but increase revenue.

The time has come to treat the soft drinks and junk food that feed salt and sugar addictions and contribute to obesity and diabetes as the dangerous substances they are and tax them accordingly, as we do with alcohol and tobacco.

Not a likely eventuality. The paradox at the heart of the health system is that the medical industry depends on people being sick. Doctors are like the police - if they were doing their jobs properly they wouldn't have a job to do. Instead a whole industry benefits from being sick. Not only the multi-billion-dollar international pharmaceutical industry, but also surgeons, nurses, clinicians and hospitals need sick people to make a living.

There is much more money to be made from developing and promoting drugs to cure illnesses caused by unhealthy lifestyles than there is to be made from supporting healthy lifestyles.

REPORTS OF MPs' travel expenses appear to have inspired bitterness in some quarters but, try as I might, I can't bring myself to feel envious of anyone who has had to spend time in Addis Ababa, Geneva or Brussels. Especially when all they have to look forward to after that is returning to Wellington.

PITY THE Greeks, back to the polls yet again. Sometimes they must wish they'd never invented democracy. But surely they wouldn't be in such a terrible financial state if they didn't keep having to pay for these expensive elections.
By Paul Little | Email Paul
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#10 User is offline   unit1of2 

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Posted 28 June 2012 - 12:19 AM

render down some orange segments, a whole walnut and a teaspoon of olive oil. Take it daily for arthritic conditions. Also shown to be great for arthritic dogs, over months giving them a tablespoon a day can put some pooches back into good walkers, owners to!
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