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Chemical Poisoning information on chemicals and solvents

#181 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 05:08 PM

http://www.nzherald....jectid=10847153

ACC keeps Buller man waiting
By Kim Fulton of the Westport News
5:19 PM Tuesday Nov 13, 2012


File photo / NZ Herald

A Buller man who has been plagued by medical problems since 2008 may have to wait at least another two months for an ACC review to be completed.

Meanwhile, Michael Blincoe of Hector has further support for his claim that chemical poisoning resulting from his work for contractor Doug Hood Mining at Stockton opencast coal mine has caused his medical problems.

The letter from occupational and environmental medicine specialist Dr David Black said Tergesol, a chemical Mr Blincoe used to degrease machines at the mine, could significantly impact cognitive processes.

Dr Black said his assessment suggested Mr Blincoe was suffering from cognitive impairment caused by Tergesol poisoning. However, Mr Blincoe needed a neuropsychiatric assessment, including psychometric testing, to clarify that.


Dr Black did not accept previous analyses, which said contact dermatitis was the only condition Mr Blincoe suffered from.

He added he did not consider reports by either the Department of Labour or ACC adequately recognised the extent to which Mr Blincoe had been exposed.

"If Mr Blincoe's description of the conditions of exposure are accepted then the conditions in which his employer instructed him and allowed him to work in posed a reckless disregard for his health."

Dr Black said there was a strong disconnect between the history he had taken and that which seemed to have entered the official records.

If the matter were to be pursued, the next step would be to attempt to clarify exactly what took place in the workplace, perhaps by a site visit and talking to other workers, the employer and the Department of Labour.

Last October ACC granted Mr Blincoe cover for occupational dermatitis resulting from Tergesol but not for neurological damage from solvent exposure.

In a letter to ACC, a Christchurch-based occupational physician said he didn't believe solvent exposure had contributed to Mr Blincoe's problems.

However, Mr Blincoe's GP, a specialist occupational physician in Greymouth and the chief medical advisor to the Department of Labour, all believed he had suffered significant chemical exposure.

Since Mr Blincoe spoke with The News in March, ACC has agreed to do neuropsychological testing. He underwent a comprehensive full day of neuropsychological testing recently after which the psychologist said she couldn't rule out neurological damage.

An ACC review is now due to take place where the corporation will decide whether to cover his claim. If it does so, more tests could be carried out and the doctors could work on what could be done to help him.

Mr Blincoe thought all the evidence for the review had been collected by November 2 and had expected a decision by the end of the month.

However, he said he had recently received a letter from a Dispute Resolution Services resolution co-ordinator saying his advocate had until November 23 to provide submissions on his behalf - "which we've already done, a long time ago".

ACC and Doug Hood Mining then had until November 30 to provide final submissions.


"Doug Hood aren't even involved in this one, they didn't turn up to the review and ACC rang me a couple of weeks ago to say they wouldn't be entering any more evidence."

A decision would be issued within 28 days of the hearing concluding on December 7.

Accounting for the Christmas period, it could be February before he had a decision, he said.

"They're stringing it out to make me suffer, that's the way I see it.

"I'm not going to have a very good Christmas."

-WPN ln
By Kim Fulton of the Westport News
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#182 User is offline   bygeorge 

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 03:27 PM

Roundup (active ingredient Glyphosphate) , GM toxicity

http://www.scoop.co....ood-harmful.htm

PROFESSOR Peter Saunders and Dr Mae-Wan Ho, have said that the latest findings of cancers and deaths from GM maize and Roundup herbicide are the result of the most in-depth long-term toxicology study ever done on GM food; ''we ignore them at our peril''.

The latest warning - perhaps the most dramatic to-date – comes in a paper published online September 18, 2012 in the journal Food and Chemical Toxicology reporting high rates of death and cancers in rats fed Monsanto’s GM maize NK603 and/or Roundup herbicide compared with controls.

...for the EU to review the safety of the herbicide Roundup (glyphosate), including the link between GM crops and the use of the herbicide.

for banning glyphosate as the damning evidence on glyphosate is even stronger than for GMOs (genetic modified organisms), and the maximum permitted levels of glyphosate are set to rise by 100-150 times in the European Union if Monsanto has its way.

The study carried out by Gilles-Eric Séralini and his group at the University of Caen involved the largest number of rats followed for their entire lifespan of two years. By all accounts, it was the most in-depth long-term toxicology study ever done on GM food. Séralini reported the results in the European Parliament.

France’s former Environment Minister Corinne Lepage MEP said the study was “a bomb” calling into question all existing regulatory authorizations of GMOs
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#183 User is offline   concerned 

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 02:25 PM

View Postbygeorge, on 04 December 2012 - 03:27 PM, said:

Roundup (active ingredient Glyphosphate) , GM toxicity

http://www.scoop.co....ood-harmful.htm

PROFESSOR Peter Saunders and Dr Mae-Wan Ho, have said that the latest findings of cancers and deaths from GM maize and Roundup herbicide are the result of the most in-depth long-term toxicology study ever done on GM food; ''we ignore them at our peril''.

The latest warning - perhaps the most dramatic to-date – comes in a paper published online September 18, 2012 in the journal Food and Chemical Toxicology reporting high rates of death and cancers in rats fed Monsanto’s GM maize NK603 and/or Roundup herbicide compared with controls.

...for the EU to review the safety of the herbicide Roundup (glyphosate), including the link between GM crops and the use of the herbicide.

for banning glyphosate as the damning evidence on glyphosate is even stronger than for GMOs (genetic modified organisms), and the maximum permitted levels of glyphosate are set to rise by 100-150 times in the European Union if Monsanto has its way.

The study carried out by Gilles-Eric Séralini and his group at the University of Caen involved the largest number of rats followed for their entire lifespan of two years. By all accounts, it was the most in-depth long-term toxicology study ever done on GM food. Séralini reported the results in the European Parliament.

France’s former Environment Minister Corinne Lepage MEP said the study was “a bomb” calling into question all existing regulatory authorizations of GMOs

http://www.sciencedi...78691512005637#
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#184 User is offline   bygeorge 

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Posted 08 December 2012 - 07:19 PM

Chemical Sensitivity - the disease that does not exist. It used to in ACC but not now. Yet, we all know of people sensitive to bee stings, adverse reactions to medications(chemicals), ozone sensitivity, formaldehyde, iodine, penicillium, nickel, peanuts but chemical sensitivity does not exist. Someone ever explain the difference. And medications are administered at very small amounts everday, so why does the inhalation or contact with non-medical chemicals result in the summation that could not possibily be considered as harmful in minute or not so small amounts(WES). One day I hope for NZ and the medical profession will overcome their naivety and blindness. In the meantime overseas activity continues and some might like to realise the head in the sand approach NZ takes to New Zealanders health.
Claudia Miller has been working in this field for over ten/twenty years - help yourself understand this real problem and the
NZ blindness problem..... 24MB. Unfortunately although a free update it doesn't include this century expansions nor comment on the syndrome of the twin towers emergency workers.

http://drclaudiamill...akes_2nd_Ed.pdf
http://drclaudiamiller.com/Articles/
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#185 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 19 December 2012 - 10:06 PM

Same kind of adverse reactions as inhaling most chemicals, including when exposed to them in the workplace.

Huffing death: One huff may be fatal, inquest told

Last updated 17:38 19/12/2012

http://www.stuff.co....al-inquest-told

A coroner is calling for a carefully coordinated approach to help prevent huffing, after an inquest attributed the death of teenager to solvent abuse.

In the decision published today, Rotorua Coroner Wallace Bain said inhalants and propellants in cans were so widely available that any age restriction ban on sales may be totally impractical.

Dangers of huffing did not appear to be fully appreciated, which was why an education programme was probably the most effective way to get the necessary messages through.

A single huff of butane from a cigarette lighter could be fatal, particularly to a new user, ESR said in evidence to the inquest.

The inquest was held into the death of a 16-year-old, who was found dead in bed by his father in January 2011.

A pathologist told the hearing the healthy teenager had inhaled butane, which caused a cardiac arrest.

ESR noted butane was an asphyxiant and caused toxicity by displacing oxygen.


There was no suggestion the teenager was intending to take his own life, the coroner said.

"It seems clear that it is an unfortunate combination of events and perhaps a misplaced view that he might obtain euphoria from the use of butane."

The teenager, whose name was suppressed, had some heart issues when he was younger, but by the time he was 16 there were no significant medical conditions, Bain said.

The inquest heard the youth had undergone a CT scan after being assaulted and concussed five months before his death. He had no other head injuries and was not on medication at the time of his death.

Between 2007 and 2011 New Zealand coroners dealt with 28 deaths due to butane toxicity, with more than 60 deaths since 2000,
Bain said.

"These statistics are frightening and decisive action is required to help reduce these entirely preventable deaths of New Zealand's young people."

The NZ Drug Foundation noted that playing around huffing was like playing Russian roulette, because butane was so fast acting and unique that it was possible to overdose quickly.

"The court is especially alarmed that young people are killing themselves in this way blissfully unaware of the life threatening risks they are exposing themselves to from huffing," Bain said.

He recommended his findings be sent to the ministers of youth affairs, social development and health for them to take a coordinated cross-agency educative and possible regulatory approach and action.

The ESR evidence said long term abusers of butane were susceptible to neurological problems such as memory loss, disturbed sleep, depression, personality changes, cognisant impairment and anxiety.


- © Fairfax NZ New
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#186 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 19 December 2012 - 11:57 PM

http://www.ccohs.ca/..._derm.html#_1_1

Dermatitis, Allergic Contact


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What is occupational contact dermatitis?
How does allergic contact dermatitis develop?
What are the contributing factors?
What occupations are at risk?
How is it recognized?
How is it treated?
How common is it?
What are the preventive measures?



What is occupational contact dermatitis?


Occupational contact dermatitis is a local inflammation of the skin. Symptoms of inflammation are itching, pain, redness, swelling, and the formation of small blisters or wheals (itchy, red circles with a white centre) on the skin. The inflammation is caused by an allergy or irritation as a result of substances found in the workplace that come into direct contact with the skin. Approximately 3,000 substances are recognized as contact allergens yet only 25 of these substances are responsible for almost half the cases of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). This document explains allergic contact dermatitis.

How does allergic contact dermatitis develop?


Allergic contact dermatitis associated with the workplace develops in stages. There is a period during which an individual may be continually in contact with allergenic substances without developing any skin reaction. This can last a lifetime or only a few days. The allergenic action of a substance depends on its ability to change some properties of the outer layer of the skin. This layer acts as a protective barrier against toxic substances. Some substances can remove fats, oils and water from the outer layer of the skin. These substances diminish the protective action of the skin and make it easier for substances to penetrate the skin.

The skin allergy really begins with a process called sensitization. It starts with the penetration of allergenic substances into the outer layer of the skin. The process lasts from four days to three weeks. During this period there are no signs of skin damage.

Once penetrated, the allergenic substance combines with natural skin proteins. The combination formed by the allergenic substance and skin proteins is then carried throughout the body by white blood cells called lymphocytes.

Lymphocytes are part of the immune system which guards the body against germs or alien substances. The immune system has a "memory" to recognize and neutralize germs or substances encountered more than once.

When sensitized workers are re-exposed, lymphocytes recognize the allergen and react with it. But they also release tissue-damaging chemicals called lymphokines. These cause itching, pain, redness, swelling, and the formation of small wheals or blisters on the skin.

This inflammation is usually confined to the site of contact with the allergen, but in severe cases it may spread to cover large areas of the body. It usually starts within twelve hours from exposure and is at its worst after three or four days. It slowly improves in about seven days. The allergic sensitization may remain with the individual through life. If there is no further contact with the allergen, the level of sensitivity may gradually decline.

What are the contributing factors?


The most common factors contributing to the development of allergic contact dermatitis are pre-existing skin conditions such as irritant contact dermatitis. Cuts or scratches, into which allergenic substances can enter, also contribute to the development of allergic contact dermatitis. The chemical nature of the substance is important (for example, whether it is an acid, an alkali, or a salt), as are the amount and concentration that comes into contact with the skin, and the length and frequency of the exposure.

Important individual factors include the resistance of the skin, which increases with age. Hereditary factors influence the variety of reactions in different persons exposed to the same allergen.

Environmental factors play a significant role. For example, hot workplaces cause sweating, which can dissolve some types of industrial chemical powders, increasing their toxicity for the skin. But sweating may also provide a protective function because it may dilute or "wash out" substances. Dry air can cause chapping of the skin, increasing the possibility of allergies.

Friction against the skin (for example, from operating grinding machines and other equipment), can abrade or scrape away the skin. This can diminish the protective action of skin against allergens.

What occupations are at risk?


Some of the occupations where allergic contact dermatitis has been seen are listed in the following tables. Some substances which can cause allergic contact dermatitis may not be listed. New materials and new processes introduce new exposures and create new risks.
List of Allergens Encountered in Various Occupations
Occupations Allergens
Agriculture workers Rubber, oats, barley, animal feed, veterinary medications, cement, plants, pesticides, wood preservatives
Artists Turpentine, pigments, dyes, colophony, epoxy resin
Automobile and aircraft industry workers Chromates, nickel, cobalt, rubber, epoxy and dimethacrylate resins
Bakers and confectioners Flavours and spices, orange, lemon, essential oils, dyes, ammonium persulphate and benzoyl peroxide.
Bartenders Orange, lemon, lime, flavours
Bookbinders Glues, resins, leathers
Butchers Nickel, sawdust
Cabinet makers and carpenters Stains, glues, woods, turpentine, varnishes, colophony
Cleaners Rubber gloves
Coal miners Rubber boots and masks
Construction workers Chromates, cobalt, rubber and leather gloves, resins, woods
Cooks and caterers Foods, onions, garlic, spices, flavours, rubber gloves, sodium metabisulphite, lauryl and octyl gallate, formaldehyde
Dentists and dental technicians Local anesthetics, mercury, methacrylates, eugenol, disinfectants, rubber, dental impression material.
Dry cleaners Rubber gloves
Electricians Fluxes, resins, rubber
Electroplaters Nickel, chromium, cobalt
Embalmers Formaldehyde
Floor-layers Cement, resins, woods, varnish
Florists and gardeners Plants, pesticides, rubber gloves
Foundry workers Phenol-and urea-formaldehyde resins, colophony
Hairdressers Dyes, persulphates, nickel, perfumes, rubber gloves, formaldehyde, resorcinol, pyrogallol
Homemakers Rubber gloves, foods, spices, flavours, nickel, chromates, polishes
Jewellers Epoxy resin, metals, soldering fluxes
Mechanics Rubber gloves, chromates, epoxy resin, antifreeze
Medical personnel Rubber gloves, anesthetics, antibiotics, antiseptics, phenothiazines, formaldehyde, glutaraldehyde, liquid chloroxylenol, hand creams
Metal workers Nickel, chromates, additives in some cutting oils
Office workers Rubber, nickel, glue
Painters Turpentine, thinners, cobalt, chromates, polyester resins, formaldehyde, epoxy resin, adhesives, paints
Photography industry workers Rubber gloves, colour developers, para-aminophenol, hydroquinone, formaldehyde, sodium metabisulphite, chromates
Plastic workers Hardeners, phenolic resins, polyurethanes, acrylics, plasticizers
Printers Nickel, chromates, cobalt, colophony, formaldehyde, turpentine
Rubber workers Rubber chemicals, dyes, colophony
Shoemakers Glues, leather, rubber, turpentine
Tannery workers Chromates, formaldehyde, tanning agents, fungicides, dyes
Textile workers Formaldehyde resins, dyes, chromates, nickel
Veterinarians Rubber gloves, medicaments

How is it recognized?


People with allergic contact dermatitis often consult a doctor. The evaluation of occupational allergic contact dermatitis includes the identification of conditions of exposure. Evaluation begins with a discussion of the person's employment, and requires a detailed description of all the processes involved in a typical day's work. It also requires a detailed list of all chemicals in the individual's working environment, and knowledge of whether other workers are affected.

Diagnosis of allergic contact dermatitis is confirmed by patch test. Minute amounts of suspected substances are applied to the skin, usually on the upper back. Inflammation at the site of application indicates that the person is allergic to a specific substance.

How is it treated?


Sensitized workers should avoid further exposure to the allergen. This alone is an effective remedy. Allergic contact dermatitis may be treated with anti-inflammatory drugs, and with ointments and skin cleansers. In general, the affected skin should be protected from physical trauma, excessive sunlight, wind, and rapid temperature changes while the dermatitis is active.

How common is it?

The present number of cases of allergic contact dermatitis in Canada is not known. According to some US statistics, skin disorders comprise more than thirty-five percent of all occupationally related diseases. Among all cases of occupational dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis accounts for about twenty percent.

What are the preventive measures?


Occupational allergic contact dermatitis can be avoided by personal hygiene, engineering control methods, good housekeeping, and personal protection. Personal hygiene, including hand washing, is very important to prevent contact dermatitis, but workers should be aware that excessive hand washing with soap and detergents can also damage the skin.

Engineering control methods involve the enclosure of processes to separate workers from the harmful substances they work with. Local exhaust systems should be used where toxic substances may escape into the workroom. Nonhazardous substances should be substituted for hazardous substances. Good housekeeping includes proper storage of substances, frequent disposal of waste, prompt removal of spills, and maintenance of the equipment to keep it free of dust, dirt and drippings.

The Canadian right-to-know legislation (WHMIS - Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System) requires workers to be informed about the nature of substances they are exposed to and how to work with them safely.

Protective clothing such as aprons and gloves should be properly selected. Not all protective clothing resists all substances. Manufacturers' specifications should be followed. Barrier creams are used as substitutes for protective clothing, especially when gloves or sleeves cannot be used safely, but they do not shield as well as protective clothing. Washrooms, toilets, and showers should be conveniently located and supplied with adequate hot water, disposable towels and soap.

Establishing a good program to avoid exposure of the skin to allergens is of vital importance to eliminate allergic contact dermatitis.
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Document last updated on October 15, 2008

Copyright ©1997-2012 Canadian Centre for Occupational Health & Safety
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#187 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 08:38 PM

http://www.independe...na-8481733.html


17-year-old girl left brain damaged after smoking synthetic marijuana


Emily Bauer left severely disabled after smoking a product she purchased from a petrol station
John Hall Author Biography

Tuesday 05 February 2013



A 17-year-old girl has been left brain damaged, blind and paralysed after smoking synthetic marijuana and suffering a series of strokes.


Emily Bauer, from Cypress in Texas, was left severely disabled after smoking a product that she purchased from a local petrol station.

Ms Bauer purchased the substance last December with friends, but around 15 minutes after smoking it, told her boyfriend she had a migraine and needed to lie down.

She subsequently suffered a series of strokes that left her urinating on herself, running into walls and suffering violent hallucinations.

Her sister Blake told CNN that the police had to be called to help restrain her and get her to Northwest Cypress Hospital, where she attempted to bite medical staff.

“We thought once she comes down off the drug, we'd take her home and show her the dangers of this drug,” her older sister, Blake, said.

“We didn't think it was as big of a deal until 24 hours later she was still violent and hurting herself. We realized you're not supposed to stay high this long.”

Ms Bauer was put into a medically induced coma, as tests revealed the strokes had caused severe vasculitis – a contraction of blood vessels that restricts blood and oxygen reaching the brain.

Ms Bauer’s stepfather Tommy Bryant told CNN: “In four days' time, we went from thinking everything is going to be OK and we'll put her in drug rehabilitation, to now you don't know if she's going to make it”.

The teenager showed initial signs of improvement, but pressure on her brain grew to dangerous levels and she required a hole drilled in her skull to relieve the burden.

Around 70 per cent of Ms Bauer’s brain was considered ‘dead’, and when doctors told her parents she would not be able to recognise her family and would never be able to use her arms or legs again, they opted to take out her breathing tubes and stop all nourishment.

Ms Bauer continued to fight however, and her condition has steadily improved. She even managed to tell her mother she loved her at one point during the early stages of her recovery.

Although she knows where she is and recognises the voices of family members, Ms Bauer is still considered highly confused.

Although she still suffers paralysis, she has recently started moving her arms and legs and even started eating solid food in the last fortnight.

Synthetic marijuana is usually an herbal mixture doused in chemicals and marketed as Spice or K2, although there is no indication that Ms Bauer consumed either of these particular brands.

To get around legal complications, synthetic marijuana is often labelled as potpourri or incense. When a particularly variety is banned, manufacturers simply change the chemical compound, allowing it to return to the shelves.

Ms Bauer’s family have set up a non-profit organisation to make teenagers and their relatives aware of the dangers of synthetic drugs.

For more information about Synthetic Awareness For Emily, visit https://www.facebook.com/safe4emily
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#188 User is offline   bygeorge 

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Posted 26 April 2013 - 07:24 PM

Sarin is an organophosphate. Tonights news has Obama wondering what to do in Syria because reports of Sarin use as chemical warfare. They say as minute an amount as a pinhead can kill you. There is little to no information to New Zealand Doctors on
organophosphates. The last seen published was 1980, Dept. of Health showing how Nelson growers were experiencing organophosphate poisoning. Two government reports in around 2006- the noxious substances report and the agrichemical trespass report advocated Doctors do a mandatory
1 or 2 week course on toxicology, no mention - of course - of occupational physicians doing such
mandatory training either, the "pseudo toxicologists" that the system lets them pretend to be.No-one has actioned on this recomendation. In fact, its got worse. The government has totally disbanded the knowledge and understanding in MAF, disbanded ERMA, made a new EPA - Environment Protection Agency. No Human protection agency exists looking at these chemicals from human health consideration.

The point is a pinhead of sarin. When you complain to doctors or occupational physicians they say as they do not understand toxicology nor the nature cholinesterase action within the body, that the amount the person would be exposed is so small is unlikely to have an effect. Signs of their ignorance - organophosphates are deadly and they work by reducing cholinesterase activity between all synapses in the body, therefore their effect is systemic - the other thing that the medical profession denys - oh such multi organ/system effects are typical of no one disease, LOL have they never learnt of the parasympathic system or such, nerve synapses cause everything that happens in a body, brain, ears, eyes, lungs, heart, digestion etc. They say oh no such small amounts are unlikely to have any effect. They deny the known: the make benign the evil.

The revision of organophosphates was put to industries, by EPA, aka strawberry grower, fruitgrowers, blueberries growers - they are not evaluated by the medical profession oh no that would jeopardise exports. Far better to ridicle those who may be forced to take a whiff or be subject to chronic inhalation. But this is too much for the medical profession to deal with. That New Zealanders are gasing themselves and workers in the fields. ONE PINHEAD you PINHEADS who don't understand toxicology and thats Death not illness - DEATH.

Do not ridicle what you do not understand or care to gain no knowledge off. The silence is killing, and illness causation of good working New Zealanders goes on and on. No-one stands up and says these are killer chemicals that need be banned whether in agri-chemical use or as fire-protectants or other formulations. No-one says - you have been poisoned.
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#189 User is offline   bygeorge 

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Posted 09 May 2013 - 06:09 PM

In response to the synthetic cannabis test by a radio host who:

The former TV3 political editor had a "change of personality" on Thursday with the help of some dairy-bought synthetic cannabis.

Garner smoked one joint of "Juicy Puff", an easily purchased synthetic drug which claims to have seven out of 10 strength, and almost instantly the effects were evident.

Dr Mullholland said he noticed four effects of the drug: dizziness, a change of personality, slight decrease in memory and an impaired ability to follow instructions.

Try telling those symptoms to ACC as reason for a problem occurring in the workplace. The radio host would be told nothing tangential to a cause. The two-facedness of NZ health is heartbreaking. Yes and rightly, great concern about drugs and synthetic drugs but solvents, ozone, formaldehyde, pesticides and many other causes of illness in the workplace with the same or worse symptoms, occurring on a daily basis are just rubbished and the person making those claims. How can it be that such symptoms are recognised to occur but when the same occur within a worker place, ACC, the medical system, the government all down cry and
leave to die, or their brains to - those people with genotypes and workplaces making them susceptible. Its all a laugh at the two faced clown by those within the system and a silent cry and weep of those affected or know the affected.

http://nz.news.yahoo...hetic-cannabis/
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#190 User is offline   Alan Thomas 

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Posted 09 May 2013 - 07:08 PM

By George there are quite a number of us who are chemically injured who have greatly reduced capacity and will die a lot younger than they otherwise would. There is a very significant review hearing in the next couple of days with the ACC have made a decision without benefit of medical any new information when they cancelled entitlements and selectively Deny payment for significant periods of time without a rational or factual basis for the decision.
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#191 User is offline   bygeorge 

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Posted 17 August 2013 - 07:33 PM

Toxicity in General: NZ does not readily acknowledge any toxicity. Nobody is trained. Nobody cares.

If toxicity from non-medical chemicals is concerning for all affected bare in mind as you struggle with your health, your causes, and your case that even the Medical profession poisons and nobody particularly cares, acknowledges or places any especial preventative mechanisms. Big statement but just read....

Southern District Health Board mental health directorate medical director James Knight accepted in ''retrospect'' the levels of clozapine in her system should have been tested when she was admitted to hospital twice after collapsing in June 2011.

The collapses were probably a result of seizures, a symptom of clozapine toxicity, and when in hospital she was found to have an irregular heartbeat, also linked to toxicity, Dr Knight said.

He also accepted, after questioning from coroner David Crerar, the DHB was ''slow off the mark'' in establishing guidelines for the drug after a man in the DHB's care died in similar circumstances four months before Ms Novak's death.

''You were a bit late in establishing the guidelines,'' Mr Crerar said.


Following the two deaths, the DHB introduced a guideline for the drug, which included recommending annual testing of clozapine levels for patients receiving more than 600mcg a day and testing if there was evidence of toxicity. Carrying out ECGs was also recommended in certain circumstances. When questioned by counsel for the Novak family, David Robinson, about the idea of national standards for clozapine, Dr Knight said: ''I think it is an excellent idea.''

As it stood, the Ministry of Health did not ''take a lead'' when it came to setting standards and should possibly have more of a role in doing so.

And how they, those who know they poisoned medically reported it....
Pathologist Martha Nicholson accepted her original finding for cause of death should have used the word ''toxicity'' rather than ''overdose'', as there was no evidence of ''intentional'' overdose.

So, if you think there is anything out there to prevent you being poisoned and a medical professional is going to know about it or do anything about, think again. NZ is a place where people are allowed to be poisoned, there is virtually no legislative protection in NZ to stop you being poisoned by those you may put your trust in. And the medical profession is not going to diagnose it, they don't know how or seek to partly because they are not trained to consider poison symptoms and poisoning. They receive no training on toxicity. They look for bugs and organic malfunction and failing that then the head. See why the head people are called in - coz its not a bug and it is not a structural organic malfunction poisoning. It is a protective response or a structural response in the brain - not being able to "see"these things then its psychiatric isn't it then. because nothing else in the diagnostic book they, the medical professional, learn from.

http://www.odt.co.nz...rug-level-fault
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#192 User is offline   Brucey 

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Posted 04 April 2016 - 02:39 PM

http://gloveup.co.nz/


Some helpful information on chemical poisoning.
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