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Help retaining ERC payments

#1 User is offline   jkhs 

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Posted 19 March 2012 - 04:25 PM

Hi,

I'm a Tetra, two years post injury, I can stand and can walk a little with crutches. I do not have much problem with pain but have some major fatigue and spasticity issues.

I live overseas and am working a few hours a week. I work in the tourism sector and it is currently the quiet season so that is all the the hours that are available. in a few months I should be up to six or seven plus three hours of language lessons.
I do not feel that I am capable of working much more then this, I try to exercise three times a week in order to maintain what function I have and to better control my spasticity. Anytime I over do it, work exercise of play, it kicks off the spasms and fatigue and it takes me a few days to recover.

Last week I received a letter stating that I needed to be working 30 hours a week within the next 12 weeks or I will be required to return to NZ and preform a Functional Capacity Evaluation, a Vocational Occupation Assessment and a Vocational Medical Assessment.

Is there anyway I can avoiding have to come back and preform these tests?
If not how do I convince them that 30 hours is too much?

Any thoughts, suggestions, advise will be very much appreciated.

Thanks..
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#2 User is offline   Huggy 

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Posted 19 March 2012 - 04:57 PM

ACC can require you to undergo any of those assessments at any time, unfortunately there is not a lot you can do, you either attend the assessments and possibly still be deemed unable to work 30 hours or more a week, or do not attend the tests where they then have the legal right to terminate your entitlements.

It is your responsibility to pay all travel costs to get to and from NZ.
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#3 User is offline   Bazil Fawlty 

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Posted 19 March 2012 - 06:02 PM

Yes, huggy is right in that you do have to do these ACC assessments.

Where abouts overseas are you? If you are in Australia could you approach ACC to have these assessments done there or which ever country you reside in?
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#4 User is offline   Bazil Fawlty 

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Posted 19 March 2012 - 06:11 PM

View PostHuggy, on 19 March 2012 - 04:57 PM, said:

ACC can require you to undergo any of those assessments at any time, unfortunately there is not a lot you can do, you either attend the assessments and possibly still be deemed unable to work 30 hours or more a week, or do not attend the tests where they then have the legal right to terminate your entitlements.

It is your responsibility to pay all travel costs to get to and from NZ.

Huggy, could the McGrath ruling apply here if jkhs has been through vocational assessment before & has not been found able to work 30 hours?

McGrath v ACC (SC 127/2010)

This case serves as a salient reminder to ACC that it can only make a claimant undergo the vocational independence process when he or she is “likely” to be assessed as vocationally independent; the process is not be used as a mere investigative process.

The recent Supreme Court decision of McGrath v ACC brings long-awaited clarity to the requirement under section 110(3) of the Accident Compensation Act 2001. The section dictates that ACC must not require a claimant to participate in a vocational independence assessment unless the claimant is likely to achieve vocational independence and until the claimant has completed any vocational rehabilitation that ACC was liable to provide under his or her rehabilitation plan.
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#5 User is offline   Brucey 

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Posted 19 March 2012 - 06:45 PM

View Postjkhs, on 19 March 2012 - 04:25 PM, said:

Hi,

I'm a Tetra, two years post injury, I can stand and can walk a little with crutches. I do not have much problem with pain but have some major fatigue and spasticity issues.

I live overseas and am working a few hours a week. I work in the tourism sector and it is currently the quiet season so that is all the the hours that are available. in a few months I should be up to six or seven plus three hours of language lessons.
I do not feel that I am capable of working much more then this, I try to exercise three times a week in order to maintain what function I have and to better control my spasticity. Anytime I over do it, work exercise of play, it kicks off the spasms and fatigue and it takes me a few days to recover.

Last week I received a letter stating that I needed to be working 30 hours a week within the next 12 weeks or I will be required to return to NZ and preform a Functional Capacity Evaluation, a Vocational Occupation Assessment and a Vocational Medical Assessment.

Is there anyway I can avoiding have to come back and preform these tests?
If not how do I convince them that 30 hours is too much?

Any thoughts, suggestions, advise will be very much appreciated.

Thanks..



You will have to do these tests, and you will not be able to convince them that you can not work 30 hours per week.
These tests are the result of a newly revamped system.
It is an exiting tool.
It employs contractors that are paid a bonus when they return a ruling that you can work 30 hours per week, they have to follow a structured format as supplied by ACC and it is designed to move very quickly.
If you do not turn up for any or all of the assessments your ERC will be stopped.

The whole process can be viewed in an article at http://www.acc.co.nz/news/WPC108004.
If you click on the link within this article you will be taken to further links, the last two should explain the process to you.

Good luck.
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#6 User is offline   jkhs 

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Posted 19 March 2012 - 07:03 PM

Thanks for the responses.

I should have also stated that I went through the Assessment just before I left the country - June last year.

That medical assessment said that I could START at 4 hours a day but made no mention of anything further. As I am overseas I am responsible for creating my own 'Graduated Return to Work' plan.

I've been assessed for my lump sum and am stable at 82% disabled. But I assume that this holds no bearing on whether or not I can work.

What happens if I do start working 30 hours. Does ACC then consider me rehabilitated and continue to pay ERC on 10 hours per week until retirement or do they then try to get me working 40?

What would happen if I just could not find a job - its not that easy these days..

@angryman - that link did not work - took me to the ACC home page.

Thanks again
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#7 User is offline   Bazil Fawlty 

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Posted 19 March 2012 - 07:05 PM

I know for a fact that ACC are using Australian Assessors to do assessments & provide medical reports to ACC on ACC claimants who live in New Zealand.

So if you live in Australia (or even another country) I do not see why you would be expected to come back to New Zealand for your vocational assessments given that ACC are already using overseas assessors.

I would be asking ACC to have the assessments in the country you reside in & asking the "If not, why not" question to ACC.
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#8 User is offline   Huggy 

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Posted 19 March 2012 - 07:21 PM

Once ACC determine you can work for 30 hours or more per week they will stop your weekly compensation. They will not top up the 10 hours a week to make it a 40 hour week. 30 hours per week is seen as full time employment and once that is achieved ACC are no longer responsible to pay you weekly compo.

It doesnt matter if it was last year that you last had the assessments. Its simple, ACC can request you attend more and if you dont they can stop your entitlements.
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#9 User is offline   Brucey 

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Posted 19 March 2012 - 07:30 PM

View Postjkhs, on 19 March 2012 - 07:03 PM, said:

Thanks for the responses.

I should have also stated that I went through the Assessment just before I left the country - June last year.

That medical assessment said that I could START at 4 hours a day but made no mention of anything further. As I am overseas I am responsible for creating my own 'Graduated Return to Work' plan.

I've been assessed for my lump sum and am stable at 82% disabled. But I assume that this holds no bearing on whether or not I can work.

What happens if I do start working 30 hours. Does ACC then consider me rehabilitated and continue to pay ERC on 10 hours per week until retirement or do they then try to get me working 40?

What would happen if I just could not find a job - its not that easy these days..

@angryman - that link did not work - took me to the ACC home page.

Thanks again




A new and comprehensive ACC vocational rehabilitation service went live today, bringing with it a clear focus on early rehabilitation for people to return to work following injury.

The service, developed in close association with the vocational rehabilitation sector, covers clients’ full spectrum of needs, from initial rehabilitation to getting a new job.

It offers four related service areas delivered by rehabilitation professionals: Standalone Workplace Assessment (which reviews the client’s workplace to identify how they did their job prior to their injury); Stay at Work service (which supports people to return to their job); Work Readiness service (which rehabilitates people ready for new types of employment); Job Placement (which helps people find new jobs).

A hallmark of the service is speed of delivery. A wealth of acknowledged international research shows the quicker people can return to the workforce, the better off they are medically, socially and financially following injury.

Accurate and fast assessment of their condition and needs is vital, and clients will be managed according to the complexity of their circumstances. Both the Stay at Work and Work Readiness services provide service packages that reflect and meet different levels of need.

Services will be provided by nine regional and national vocational rehabilitation suppliers, who will work closely with ACC. They will be responsible, through their staff and sub-contractors, for providing day-to-day services throughout the country. Their performance will be monitored, and they are required to meet key performance indicators designed to maintain the momentum and quality of service delivery.

The result is a vocational rehabilitation service on which clients, their GPs and employers, and ACC can rely on for fast, accurate and appropriate service.

This means that, over time, GPs should be able to minimise the duration for which they certify patients off work or fit for selected duties because they can be confident that their patients will get the service they need to return to work safely and quickly.

More information on ACC’s vocational rehabilitation services can be found at www.acc.co.nz/for-providers/contracts-and-performance/all-contracts/index.htm, under vocational rehabilitation.
Vocational rehabilitation services – at a glance

Service


Details

Stand Alone Workplace Assessment


Assesses the client’s pre-injury workplace to inform decisions on their work options.

Stay ay Work


Supports clients returning to their original job; four levels of packaged services, reflecting ascending levels of complexity.



Vocational Rehabilitation services

On this page

Overview
Service design
Questions and answers on vocational rehabilitation
Supplier technical information

Overview

ACC’s comprehensive vocational rehabilitation service which focuses on enabling injured workers to recover and rehabilitate at work or return as soon as is safe and practicable.

The premise of the service, drawn from internationally accepted research, is that the workplace fosters well being. Remaining at work avoids the negative health, social and financial consequences experienced by people off work for a prolonged period following injury.

Services are therefore designed for fast and effective deployment around the goal of returning clients to work. Key characteristics of service delivery are accurate needs assessment, appropriate service selection, timely provision of quality service and a focus on achieving agreed outcomes.
Service design

ACC provides end-to-end vocational rehabilitation services that meet the spectrum of client needs, from initial injury to rehabilitating at work to finding a new job where it is not possible for the client to remain in their pre-injury role.

Services are designed around four elements – Stand Alone Workplace Assessment; Stay at Work; Work Readiness; Job Placement:

The Stand Alone Workplace Assessment assesses the client’s pre-injury workplace and the nature of the client’s work tasks. It is available for clients who require no further vocational rehabilitation.
Stay at Work is the service that supports clients to return to work, preferably to their pre-injury job or to a temporarily modified job with the same employer. The service is divided into four levels, which reflect the ascending complexity of the client’s injury and circumstances. ACC’s Case Managers select the appropriate service level and refer clients to suppliers for service.
The Work Readiness service supports clients who are not expected to return to their pre-injury job or who cannot maintain their current job, to become work ready. The service has three levels, reflecting ascending degrees of complexity, and a different mix of vocational rehabilitation services is delivered at each stage.
The Job Placement service has two levels – Job Search and Job Brokerage. Job Brokerage is for clients who are not vocationally independent and want to target occupations in which they already have the necessary skills to perform. Job Search is for people who are vocationally independent, can work 30 plus hours per week and need help finding a job prior to the cessation of their weekly compensation.

Questions and answers on vocational rehabilitation

A number of questions and answers (PDF 84K) have been produced to give you more information about the vocational rehabilitation service.
Supplier technical information
Service supplier directory

Vocational rehabilitation services are provided by nine suppliers (XLS 100K), who work in the community through experienced providers drawn from physiotherapy, occupational therapy, occupational nursing and career development.
Supplier skills and competency

All suppliers, and their providers at community level, must meet clearly defined skill and competency levels before they can deliver services. These are set out in the supplier skills and competency requirements (PDF 62K).
Operational Guidelines

A full set of operational guidelines (PDF 254K) is available for suppliers. These guidelines describe vocational rehabilitation services in detail and provide key information for suppliers on how they are to be delivered. If a supplier is in doubt about the delivery of a service, please defer to the service schedule and not the operational guidelines.

It is envisaged this document will be updated from time to time.
Performance surveys

All suppliers must meet a number of Key Performance Indicators, including satisfaction surveys undertaken by clients and employers. Full guidelines (PDF 45K) and surveys (PDF 18K) are available for downloading.
eProvider reporting

A number of reports must be filed through ACC’s eProvider portal, in addition to manual reporting suppliers complete on standard ACC templates. Full details of how this can be done can be found in the eProvider guidelines.
Equipment and modification

A guide to rules and processes in relation to equipment and modification (PDF 61K) is available.

Last updated: 12 March 2012



Work rehabilitation assessment - medical and occupational

On this page

Purpose of the service
Qualifications required
How does a claimant access the service?
What do the services involve?
Occupational assessment

Purpose of the service

The purpose of the work rehabilitation assessment services (medical and occupational) is to:

Receive an occupational assessment to provide ACC with a comprehensive list of occupations for which the claimant is suited by reason of experience, education, or training (or any combination of these). These are the ‘Identified Jobs’.
Receive a medical assessment to consider the consequences of the claimant’s personal injury and make one recommendation to ACC as to whether the claimant has capacity to engage in work for each of the occupations identified as suitable by the occupational assessor, or whether further rehabilitation is required.

Qualifications required
Medical assessment

Medical practitioners are approved by ACC from time to time to provide assessments/reassessments under this Agreement.
Occupational assessment

The assessment services may only be carried out by the approved assessor/s who must:

have a tertiary qualification relevant to vocational guidance
be trained in using and interpreting validated psychometric test and assessment instruments
have experience in assisting people to identify realistic job choices, and
have and retain current membership of a relevant professional association (eg, NZAC, NZPS, or NZAOT).

The provider will ensure that all assessors receive clinical supervision and participate in a minimum of ten supervised assessments per year with an experienced clinical psychologist (or some other similarly qualified supervisor).

The provider will not change any approved assessor unless:

the assessor is unavailable for reasons of ill health, poor performance, parental leave or resignation
the substituted assessor has the qualifications described in (a) above, and
ACC has, in its sole discretion, agreed to such substitution.

How does a claimant access the service?

Medical and occupational assessment services will be provided by the approved assessor on receipt of a written referral of a claimant from an ACC case manager. The approved assessor must not accept a referral, or carry out an assessment, of a claimant for whom the approved assessor or the provider has previously carried out an assessment (other than a WRAP Assessment) for ACC.

Claimants referred by ACC for assessment in accordance with WRAP will be receiving weekly compensation, and will have completed their individual rehabilitation programme, but will not yet be in employment for 35 hours or more per week. Note: There may be circumstances in which a claimant is working for 35 hours or more per week, but their weekly earnings are less than their pre-injury earning capacity. These claimants are on abatement (still receiving weekly compensation) and may be referred for WRAP.

The services for a claimant are deemed to be completed when satisfactory medical and occupational assessment reports are received and accepted by the ACC case manager.
What do the services involve?
Medical assessment

Assessment or reassessment of a claimant by an assessor must include, but need not be limited to:

Review of background information provided with the referral, prior to the appointment with the claimant, to enable the approved assessor to become familiar with the claimant’s personal injury, interventions to date and the identified jobs;
Explaining the medical assessment component of the work capacity assessment process to the claimant;
Clinical examination of the claimant which has as its focus the claimant’s personal injury or injuries. Where a claimant has multiple injuries, covered by ACC or another insurer, all injuries should be taken into account when determining capacity for work;
Use of professionally recognised objective assessment methodologies during the clinical examination that achieve defensible and recognised findings;
The results of any specialist medical assessments of the claimant’s condition;
Inviting the claimant to comment on all job options identified as suitable for the claimant and ensuring the claimant’s comments are contained within the report;
Inviting the claimant to make submissions and raise any issues or concerns about their personal injury or injuries, their capacity to work in the job options identified as suitable, and the assessor’s findings and proposed recommendations. These claimant issues, comments, submissions, and/or concerns will be included in the report and considered prior to recommendations being made to ACC;
Consideration of the claimant’s current capacity to consistently engage in work for 35 hours or more per week in each of the job options identified as suitable having regard to the present consequences of the claimant’s personal injury (Capacity for Work).

In considering capacity for work, the approved assessor will:

Consider the claimant’s capacity as at the date of the examination;
Disregard factors other than the claimant’s personal injury(s) which may affect the claimant’s capacity, such as:

illness before the personal injury
non-injury related illness developed after the personal injury
alcoholism or drug dependency
psychological conditions present before the personal injury, or
lack of job opportunities.

Requesting additional information where necessary and taking all steps contemplated in this schedule on receiving that information, such as incorporating that information in the medical assessment report;
If the claimant does not have capacity for work in any of the identified jobs, consideration of the health and rehabilitation needs and goals of the claimant, with the aim of increasing their ability to engage in work for more than 35 hours per week in at least one of the identified jobs;
Preparation and provision to the case manager of the medical assessment report.

When pain presents as an issue in the medical assessment process, the approved assessor is to consider the following:

Does the pain represent an objectively verifiable medical condition because of which the claimant is likely to suffer harm if they resumed work in any of the identified jobs?
The medical condition must be attributable to the claimant’s personal injury. While a claimant may experience similar or greater levels of pain upon resuming work, this does not indicate in itself that harm is occurring.

Occupational assessment

Assessment of a claimant by an assessor must include, but need not be limited to:

Review of the information provided with the referral, prior to the appointment with the claimant, to enable the assessor to become familiar with the claimant’s background, current skills and vocational interventions to date;
Explaining the occupational assessment component of the WRAP process to the claimant;
Consultation with the claimant, which has as its focus the skills the claimant has obtained through experience, education and/or training (including any skills developed since the injury, through vocational rehabilitation and work experience);
Use of professionally recognised objective assessment methodologies during the consultation that achieve defensible and recognised findings;
Identification of all paid jobs requiring a minimum of 35 hours per week that the claimant is suited for by reason of the claimant’s experience, education or training, or any combination of these (the Identified Jobs).

In identifying such jobs, the assessor will:

Consider the claimant’s suitability as at the date of the consultation;
Disregard the following factors:

the effects of the claimant’s injury on the claimant’s ability to work. The assessor should not exclude jobs because s/he believes the claimant may not be able to perform them due to the claimant’s Injury (this is the role of the WRAP medical assessor)
job availability
the claimant’s child care requirements
transportation availability
the claimant’s pre-injury occupation, except when prioritising job options, ie, job options must not be limited to those which compare with the claimant’s pre-injury earnings, hours of work or perceived status or prestige

Be realistic about job choices. Jobs must exist within the current New Zealand labour market or be stated within the NZ Standards of Classification of Occupations (1995);
Document claimant reaction to all job choices;
Whilst not limiting jobs for which the claimant is suited by reason of experience, education or training or any combination of these, the assessor will identify and prioritise job options that most closely align with the claimant’s pre-injury occupation;
Inviting the claimant to comment, make submissions and raise any issues or concerns about their experience, education, training, potential job options and the assessor’s findings and proposed recommendations to enable these issues and/or concerns to be considered prior to recommendations being made to ACC. However, a claimant’s disagreement with some or all of the identified jobs because they are not the claimant’s preference, is not a reason for excluding them from the assessor’s recommendations. These concerns will need to be discussed with the claimant and documented;
Preparation of the occupational assessment report, covering the following main areas:

previous work experience
education and training attainments
transferable skills
the Identified Jobs
summary
comments, submissions, issues and/or concerns raised by the claimant
start and completion time of the interview.

Completing and signing a job details sheet for each identified job (in the format specified), outlining the functions and activities required for each identified job. This includes any research required to complete this sheet;
Completing and signing Section One of the Work Rehabilitation recommendation form (in the format specified in Appendix 4), specifying each identified Job;
Making any requested clarifications;
Responsibility for any administrative matters as would normally be required when undertaking an assessment including the recording of service outcomes in clinical notes, and maintaining internal information systems and records.

The services will be provided by the provider at premises which are appropriate for the assessment, and which comply with the relevant provisions of this Agreement. services will be provided in a location that is independent of ACC.
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#10 User is offline   jkhs 

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Posted 19 March 2012 - 07:52 PM

View PostBazil Fawlty, on 19 March 2012 - 06:11 PM, said:

Huggy, could the McGrath ruling apply here if jkhs has been through vocational assessment before & has not been found able to work 30 hours?

McGrath v ACC (SC 127/2010)

This case serves as a salient reminder to ACC that it can only make a claimant undergo the vocational independence process when he or she is “likely” to be assessed as vocationally independent; the process is not be used as a mere investigative process.

The recent Supreme Court decision of McGrath v ACC brings long-awaited clarity to the requirement under section 110(3) of the Accident Compensation Act 2001. The section dictates that ACC must not require a claimant to participate in a vocational independence assessment unless the claimant is likely to achieve vocational independence and until the claimant has completed any vocational rehabilitation that ACC was liable to provide under his or her rehabilitation plan.


This does not apply I think as because I am overseas, Thailand, ACC is not required to provide any vocational rehabilitation.

@ Angryman - thanks.

OK, lets say I go back, do the assessments and it is determined that I can work 30 hours. I assume that means that ERC will cease from that point on but what happens if I develop a pressure sore and am bedridden for a few weeks. Would they reinstate my payments while I heeled or am I off the books for good?
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#11 User is offline   Huggy 

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Posted 19 March 2012 - 08:10 PM

If they determine you are vocationally independent, but later you find you cant work because of your injury you are entitled to ask to be reassessed but of course you have to come back to NZ to be reassessed.

When they determine you are able to return into a job that is 30 hours or more per week they will give you 3 months notice, then they stop your weekly compo.
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#12 User is offline   Brucey 

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Posted 19 March 2012 - 08:48 PM

[attachment=7979:wpc107990.pdf]

This file is also worth a look.
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#13 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 19 March 2012 - 08:58 PM

To link to The Sauce mentioned at the end of the link posted by angryman.

http://www.gets.govt...x?show=HomePage

View Postangryman, on 19 March 2012 - 08:48 PM, said:

Attachment wpc107990.pdf

This file is also worth a look.

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#14 User is offline   unicorn57 

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Posted 19 March 2012 - 10:34 PM

If you are living overseas - in Thailand -is this permanent? If its a permanent move - your new country, then why would you expect ACC support? You would need to seek something similar from the Thai government? I think you can only recieve ACC ERC for the first 6 months that you live overseas. Its a NZ compensation not a Thai one.

Anyway, if you have an 82% impairment, then I dont see how you can be cleared for 35 hours a week work....

It would be best for you to come back to NZ and be Kiwi if you want to get ACC income - coz its owned by NZers.

Im not meaning to be too blunt about this - Its just that I asked them this question when I was wondering whether I would lose my ERC if I went and lived in the country that my children had moved to - and the above is what I was told. They also told me that I wasnt allowed to leave the country for more than 4 weeks a year, coz I had a responsibility to ACC and its requirements of me, and 4 weeks holiday a year is all that Im allowed!! I have to make myself available for assessments or any other requirement they may ask (demand) from time to time.

In fact in 2009, I had to go and help my daughter and grandson, who had narrowly escaped death (lost their home and all their belongings) in the Marysville bushfires - black Saturday. My CM knew this was what I was doing. After 4 weeks, she stopped my ERC - which at the time I was using to support my daughter and grandson as best I could, coz the Oz govt hadnt got their act together yet. I was over there 12 weeks. It was a nightmare - and after my income ceased, it was even worse.

I dont think they will be sympathetic about you at all - and yet I believe they should be - with your 82% disability. Maybe you could try getting a WINZ Invalids Benefit, which is only renewable annually. How do you manage to renew you ARC18s every 3 months from Thailand?
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#15 User is offline   unicorn57 

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Posted 20 March 2012 - 06:04 AM

View PostHuggy, on 19 March 2012 - 08:10 PM, said:

If they determine you are vocationally independent, but later you find you cant work because of your injury you are entitled to ask to be reassessed but of course you have to come back to NZ to be reassessed.

When they determine you are able to return into a job that is 30 hours or more per week they will give you 3 months notice, then they stop your weekly compo.


Thats what theyre SUPPOSED to do - but what they did with me (even though I had a new and current ARC18) was to send me an email advising me that my ERC would cease a few weeks from the writing of the email - on the grounds that my case manager had decided that my incapacity to work was not due to my accepted injury!! Go figure - waiting for review in May. My GP has/had declared me fully unfit for work due to these injuries as per my accepted claims!

MY CASE MANAGER IS NOT A DOCTOR!!!
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#16 User is offline   Huggy 

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Posted 20 March 2012 - 06:13 AM

You are entitled to ERC while you live overseas for as long as you are eligible for ACC. The only thing is you must attend assessments when ACC ask you to.

It doesnt cut off after 6 months as Unicorn has said.
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#17 User is offline   not their victim 

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Posted 20 March 2012 - 07:05 AM

no where but nowhere in the LEGISLATION does it state acc have the power to cut you off for going on holiday



you are not on a benefit

you are on INCOME REPLACEMENT INSURANCE PAYMENT! otherwise known as ERC...earnings related compensation

end of story...
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#18 User is offline   Gloria Mitchell 

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Posted 20 March 2012 - 01:56 PM

Hi Huggy, You know the McGrath highcourt judgement would aid this claimant. They need to have a reasonable expectation that this claimant is able to acheive 30 hours a week to insist in such a manner that they reutrn or disentitle. A Tetra......they don't even have to supply social rehab cares or anything except erc when you reside overseas.

Take that other link to NZ Herald and ask your questions there. come on guys and gals be helpful.

Gloria
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#19 User is offline   doppelganger 

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Posted 20 March 2012 - 03:50 PM

To me the case manager has not even looked at the legislation or injuries and incapacities.

Using the Mcgrath's decision a polite letter to the case manager asking what occupation do they think that this person can work in

Advise due to injury that you are able to work the 10 hours as stated in the first post and ask for an explaination on why the case manager thinks 30 pluss hours are acheivable.

You could also explain that the cost to completed the assessment is going to place a burdon on your self. Ask for assistance with the cost of completting the assessment exspecially as this is an extra when no increase in earnings is likely to be acheived due to the physical acheivements.
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#20 User is offline   jkhs 

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  • Joined: 16-December 10

Posted 23 March 2012 - 10:42 PM

Sorry for the tardy reply.

Last couple of days have been tough.

Thanks everyone, for the information and suggestions.
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