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Phone hack probe: woman arrested,& related information Private Investigators implicated - Uk

#1 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 24 June 2011 - 12:30 AM

http://www.independe...ed-2301519.html

Phone hack probe: woman arrested

PA

Thursday, 23 June 2011

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Detectives investigating allegations of voicemail hacking have arrested a woman.

The suspect was detained just before 7am today at a residential address in West Yorkshire, Scotland Yard said.

She was arrested on suspicion of conspiring to intercept mobile phone voicemail messages and was being questioned at a police station in Yorkshire, said a spokesman.

The arrest is part of Operation Weeting, a new investigation into phone hacking allegations involving the News of the World which was launched by the Metropolitan Police in January.

The paper's former royal reporter Clive Goodman and private detective Glenn Mulcaire were jailed in 2007 for intercepting messages from members of the Royal household.

The new inquiry was set up following allegations that other famous people also had their messages intercepted.

Three News of the World journalists have been arrested since the new inquiry was launched.

Scotland Yard gave no details about the suspect arrested this morning.

News International said in a statement: "This morning's events did not relate to a current employee or a former full-time member of staff of the News of the World.

"We have been co-operating fully with the police inquiry since our voluntary disclosure of evidence reopened the police investigation.

"Since then we have been determined to deal with these issues both on the criminal and civil side. In April we admitted liability in several civil cases and we are attempting to bring these to a fair resolution."

Some think they can get away with things but the will get caught up with eventaully.

Raises the question of how many http://www.acc.co.nz/ clients have had their phones hacked by Private Investigators over the years and weren't aware it had been done to them.

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#2 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 24 June 2011 - 12:38 AM

http://www.guardian....an-in-yorkshire

Phone hacking: police arrest woman in Yorkshire


Scotland Yard detectives arrest 39-year-old woman, who is understood not to be a journalist

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Sandra Laville
guardian.co.uk, Thursday 23 June 2011 09.46 BST
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News of the World
Police have arrested a 39-year-old woman in West Yorkshire as part of their inquiry into phone hacking by the News of the World. Photograph: Graeme Robertson for the Guardian

Detectives investigating phone hacking by the News of the World have arrested a woman in West Yorkshire, Scotland Yard has said.

The 39-year-old woman was arrested at 6.55am at her home on suspicion of conspiring to intercept communications contrary to section 1 of the Criminal Law Act 1977.

Scotland Yard, which has 45 officers investigating phone hacking as part of Operation Weeting, did not release details of the woman's identity. However, it is understood the woman arrested is not a journalist. She was taken to a police station in West Yorkshire for questioning this morning.

Metropolitan police commissioner Sir Paul Stephenson said on Wednesday the Operation Weeting team remained at 45 strong and was continuing its wide-ranging inquiry into phone hacking as well as providing information for the civil court claims.

A spokesman for Scotland Yard said: "The woman was arrested from a residential address in West Yorkshire.

"Operation Weeting is conducting a new investigation into phone hacking. It would be inappropriate to discuss any further details regarding this case at this time."

A spokeswoman for News of the World owner News International said: "This morning's events did not relate to a current employee or a former full-time member of staff of the News of the World.

"We have been co-operating fully with the police inquiry since our voluntary disclosure of evidence reopened the police investigation.

"Since then we have been determined to deal with these issues both on the criminal and civil side. In April we admitted liability in several civil cases and we are attempting to bring these to a fair resolution."

The woman is the fourth person arrested by officers on the inquiry. In April a senior reporter at the News of the World, James Weatherup, was arrested and questioned. Weatherup, who has also worked as a news editor with the Sunday tabloid, was released after questioning.

The paper's chief reporter Neville Thurlbeck, and assistant editor (news) Ian Edmondson, were also held in April and released on police bail to return in September.

Scotland Yard was heavily criticised over its handling of the original phone-hacking inquiry, which led to the conviction of News of the World royal editor Clive Goodman and private investigator Glenn Mulcaire in January 2007. The then News of the World editor, Andy Coulson, resigned following Goodman and Mulcaire's convictions.

Coulson resigned again as prime minister David Cameron's director of communications in January this year, admitting that the ongoing row about the affair was making his job impossible. He had resigned as News of the World editor following the conviction of Goodman and Mulcaire in January 2007.

Days later the Met launched Operation Weeting, after receiving "significant new information" from News International.

• To contact the MediaGuardian news desk email [email protected] or phone 020 3353 3857. For all other inquiries please call the main Guardian switchboard on 020 3353 2000. If you are writing a comment for publication, please mark clearly "for publication".

• To get the latest media news to your desktop or mobile, follow MediaGuardian on Twitter and Facebook

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Phone-hacking investigation: arrested woman 'may have written for NoW'

Woman arrested by Scotland Yard detectives believed to have contributed articles to Sunday tabloid. By James Robinson and Sandra Laville

Andy Gray settles phone-hacking case

Phone hacking: police have more than 100 recordings

Ryan Giggs launches legal action over phone hacking

Editorial: Time for a public inquiry on phone hacking

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Making an assumption here, was she a telecommunications provider staff member?

It wouldn't surprize us if it was as they would have "inside information".

Hope she gets a hefty jail sentence.

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#3 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 08 July 2011 - 12:33 PM

Met chief: phone-hacking documents point to 'inappropriate payments'

http://www.guardian....acking-payments

Sir Paul Stephenson confirms News International documents appear to include information on payments to police officers

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Haroon Siddique
http://www.guardian.co.uk, Wednesday 6 July 2011 13.40 BST
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Sir Paul Stephenson
The Met police commissioner, Sir Paul Stephenson, said he had discussed the matter with the Independent Police Complaints Commission. Photograph: Graeme Robertson

The Metropolitan police commissioner, Sir Paul Stephenson, has said that documents provided by News International as part of the investigation into phone hacking appear to include information on "inappropriate payments" to police officers.

His comments came after it was reported on Tuesday night that News International had given his force details of payments made by the News of the World to senior police officers between 2003 and 2007, the period when Andy Coulson was the paper's editor.

Stephenson said on Wednesday he was taking the "unusual step" of issuing a statement because of widespread media coverage and public interest surrounding Operation Weeting, the investigation into phone hacking.

He said: "I can confirm that on 20 June 2011 the MPS [Metropolitan police service] was handed a number of documents by News International, through their barrister, Lord Macdonald QC. Our initial assessment shows that these documents include information relating to alleged inappropriate payments to a small number of MPS officers."

He said the matter had been discussed with the Independent Police Complaints Commission, which concluded that it should continue to be investigated by Operation Elveden, led by the Met deputy assistant commissioner Sue Akers, in partnership with the force's Directorate of Professional Standards.

Stephenson added: "At this time we have not seen any evidence requiring a referral to the Metropolitan Police Authority in respect of any senior officer. Whilst I am deeply concerned by recent developments surrounding phone hacking they are a product of the meticulous and thorough work of Operation Weeting, which will continue. Operation Elveden will be equally thorough and robust. Anyone identified of wrongdoing can expect the full weight of disciplinary measures and if appropriate action through the criminal courts."

There have been suggestions from some quarters that the story relating to Coulson allegedly paying police officers, featured prominently in the Times, also part of the News International stable, on Tuesday, was a distraction exercise.

Labour MP Tom Watson told BBC News: "This is desperation from News International. They are trying to protect Rebekah Brooks [chief executive of News International], who rightly faces the ire of the nation today."

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Did Peter Gibbons an ex http://www.police.govt.nz Police Officer, turned Private Investigator, pay his Police Officer relations and contacts for information when he was involved in obtaining information through unlawfully obtained search warrants?

Do http://www.acc.co.nz pay the NZ Police for information about clients of http://www.acc.co.nz?




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#4 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 08 July 2011 - 12:49 PM

A private investigator 's secret window on the world

5:00 AM Monday May 28, 2001

Jim Butterworth inside the undercover van. Picture / Peter Meecham

By JOHN ANDREWS

Trying to rip off a medical insurance company? Be aware. A guy in that innocuous looking van nearby may be secretly monitoring your every move.

Behind the tinted windows could be a private investigator, assigned to catch fraudsters and thieves on film.

The 16 staff in Ron McQuilter's Auckland-based firm, The Investigation Bureau - mainly ex-policemen - are trained in surveillance tactics.

They often use the chameleon-like vehicle furtively to document the activities of those trying to make a fraudulent buck - sometimes millions of them.

Mr McQuilter believes his van is the only privately-owned surveillance vehicle of its type in the country.

Adding false company signs to the outside, private investigators are able to spend hours at a time in the vehicle, which has a toilet, cameras, desk and chairs which are fixed to the floor with suction cups, even a whiteboard.

Mr McQuilter spent $6500 fitting out the van with extra batteries to power fans, a music system, special lights, rear window demister - just about everything an investigator needs while watching a target.

The money appears to have been well spent because of those being monitored, no one has yet twigged to the real reason the van is in their immediate vicinity.

The stealth vehicle has been such a success that Government law enforcement agents often borrow it for their surveillance duty.

This is the second van to be fitted out for surveillance by The Investigation Bureau. It replaced the original bureau van, an ageing vehicle which had its cover blown after it was used by a rival firm and shown in a television documentary.

After that everyone in the trade knew it was a surveillance van, Mr McQuilter said. Its time was up.

As an example of how effective the new van is, Mr McQuilter cited the case of an American insurance company which commissioned the bureau to monitor the activities of a foreign yacht passenger in Tauranga last September.

The yachtie had reportedly tried to sue for millions of dollars over a medical claim.

"This guy said he could do nothing because he was so ill. He could do no lifting, bending or anything,"Mr McQuilter said.

"We were able to park the van at the marina for a week. We would have been 20 metres from the guy.

"While in port he repaired and replaced a complete awning over the boat.

"The insurance company was so rapt they paid us in United States dollars instead of our bill in New Zealand dollars. We refunded the difference."

Mr McQuilter also tells what he regards as a classic story of an Auckland man claiming an insurance payment of $100,000.

It was a medical insurance claim that he had a permanent disability that he claimed had got progressively worse. The man said he was so ill he had to retrain himself to use a computer using a stick in his mouth.

"We got him three days in a row grinding rust off a van and welding bits on a truck.

"We were that close [in the van] to him that in transcribing notes on a tape recorder, you could hear the guy whistling."

The target of this operation did not succeed with his insurance claim.

"We recommended they prosecute him."

If Mr Ron McQuilter and his team were in the UK doing what he and his team of Private Investigators have got away with in NZ, they too would be under investigation for what they have been doing to obtain private information and be in the hotseat, like the scum picked up in Operation Weeting.

Will the likes of Michael Bott speak out about such abhorrent behaviour of Private Investigators and their lowest of low tactics in New Zealand?

The reality is, it is equally as abhorrent.

Is this the one & the same Ron McQuilter refered to in the "Over the teacups" thread, who said it is against the law and knows it is against the law to use such devices?


http://accforum.org/...593#entry120593


Paragon Investigations
private investigator Ron McQuilter said it was "shocking" how easy it was to buy listening equipment. His company offered bug sweeping and did around five searches a year, although he had found only one device during his entire career.

Operation Weeting

http://en.wikipedia....eration_Weeting

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
This article needs attention from an expert on the subject. See the talk page for details. WikiProject Journalism or the Journalism Portal may be able to help recruit an expert. (July 2011)
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Please expand this article using the suggested source(s) below.
More information might be found in a section of the talk page.
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This article documents a current event. Information may change rapidly as the event progresses.

Operation Weeting is a British police investigation under the Specialist Crime Directorate of the Metropolitan Police Service[1] into allegations of phone hacking in the News of the World phone hacking affair.[2][3]

The investigation is led by Deputy Assistant Commissioner Sue Akers of the Metropolitan Police Service.[4]

As of June 2011, it was reported to have 45 officers working for it.[5]

Based on documentation provided to Operation Weeting, the Metropolitan Police Service opened an additional investigation, Operation Elveden.[6][7]

The Guardian reported on the 7th of July 2011 that Andy Coulson, the former editor of the News of the World and a senior advisor to British Prime Minister David Cameron is to be arrested the following day on the 8th, along with a senior journalist who the paper refused to name. [8]
[edit] References

^ PA (9 February 2011). "New angle in phone hacking probe". The Independent. Retrieved 2011-07-06.
^ Wesley Johnson (6 July 2011). "Ex-phone hacking probe officer to face MPs". The Independent. Retrieved 2011-07-06.
^ "McCann's spokesman talks to police in phone hacking probe". Leicester Mercury. July 6, 2011. Retrieved 2011-07-06.
^ Rebecca Camber and Stephen Wright (10th February 2011). "Up to 3,000 may have been victims of phone hacking". Daily Mail. Retrieved 2011-07-06.
^ Cahal Milmo and Martin Hickman (24 June 2011). "Freelance reporter held in phone-hacking investigation". The Independent.
^ "Statement from Commissioner". Metropolitan Police Service. 6 July 2011. Retrieved 2011-07-07.
^ "Met chief: phone-hacking documents point to 'inappropriate payments'". The Guardian. 6 July 2011. Retrieved 2011-07-07.
^ "Andy Coulson to be arrested over phone hacking tomorrow". The Guardian. 7 July 2011. Retrieved 7 July 2011.

[edit] See also

Operation Elveden
Operation Motorman
(ICO investigation)

[edit] External links

Operation Weeting collected news and commentary from The Independent
Statement from Commissioner, Metropolitan Police, 6 July 2011

Stub icon This United Kingdom-related article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.
Categories: Articles to be expanded with sources | Current events | United Kingdom stubs | Police operations in the United Kingdom | News of the World

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This post has been edited to include information that shows chronological order of incidents and puts this behaviour into better context of what has been happening in New Zealand by Private Investigators.
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#5 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 08 July 2011 - 12:59 PM

http://content.met.p...2/1257246741786

Metropolitan Police
logo

Statement regarding Operation Weeting

07 July 2011
News

Deputy Assistant Commissioner Sue Akers, who is in charge of Operation Weeting, said:

I have huge sympathy for those who may have been the victims of phone hacking or intrusion into their private lives. It must be incredibly distressing to see details of the information held, or speculation about what may be held, about them in the media. This is forcing them to relive devastating experiences.

I stand by my commitment that Operation Weeting will contact all those who have some personal contact details found in the documents seized in 2006 and my officers are working hard to ensure it is fulfilled as soon as possible.

This is taking a significant amount of time and resources. I think it is important that I further explain the scale of the task and the challenges we face.

We are going through approximately 11,000 pages of material containing almost 4,000 names. In addition we have been contacted by hundreds of people who believe that they may have been affected.

We have contacted many people already and will contact others whose details appear as quickly as possible. We are also making contact with organisations that represent the large groups of people reported to be affected to provide reassurance.

I understand that many people may be upset and will want to seek information from us. I ask them to be patient and reassure them we will contact them if they are affected - have confidence in us to keep our promise but also realise it will take time.

To protect the privacy of those people who do not want to be identified we are not going to comment on individual cases or be drawn on details of those allegedly affected published in the media.

I will be reiterating and expanding upon these points when I appear before the Home Affairs Select Committee on Tuesday 12 July.


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What, if any, steps have http://www.acc.co.nz taken to ensure there clients receive an apology whom had confidential http://www.police.govt.nz records accessed unlawfully via there Risk and Investigations teams over the years?

What steps have http://www.acc.co.nz taken to ensure the staff who distributed private information to third parties, including to Private Investigators, have been dismissed for breaches of the law?

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#6 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 11 July 2011 - 12:05 PM

Was there a cover-up at Murdoch HQ?

http://www.hindustan...le1-719392.aspx

Nick Davies and Amelia Hill, The Guardian
London, July 10, 2011
Email to Author

First Published: 00:02 IST(10/7/2011)
Last Updated: 00:03 IST(10/7/2011)
Police are investigating evidence that a News International executive may have deleted millions of emails from an internal archive in an apparent attempt to obstruct Scotland Yard’s inquiry into the phone-hacking scandal. The archive is believed to have reached back to January 2005,
revealing daily contact between ‘News of the World’ editors, reporters and outsiders, including private investigators.

The messages are potentially highly valuable both for the police and for the numerous public figures who are suing News International (NI).

According to legal sources close to the police inquiry, a senior executive is believed to have deleted “massive quantities” of the archive on two separate occasions, leaving only a fraction to be disclosed.

One of the alleged deletions is said to have been made at the end of January, just as Scotland Yard was launching Operation Weeting, its new inquiry into the affair. The allegation directly contradicts NI claims that it is co-operating fully with police in order to expose its history of illegal newsgathering.

The alleged deletion of emails will be of particular interest to the media regulator Ofcom, which said it had asked to be “kept abreast” of developments in the Met’s hacking investigation, so it can assess whether News Corp would pass the “fit and proper” test that all owners of UK television channels have to meet.

That came amid the first signs that Rebekah Brooks’s grip on NI was weakening on a dramatic day when prime ministter David Cameron all but called for her resignation.

The scandal brought a number of arrests on Friday, with the prime minister’s former PR chief Andy Coulson held under suspicion of involvement in phone hacking.

Clive Goodman, the NoW’s former royal reporter, was also arrested in relation to the alleged payment of bribes to police, and subsequently bailed.

And on Friday night an unnamed 63-year-old man was also arrested in connection with alleged corruption.

The Guardian understands that the suspected deletion of emails is one of a number of actions that have infuriated detectives investigating hacking. In addition to deleting emails, NI executives have also:

Leaked information in spite of an undertaking to police that they would keep it confidential.

Risked prosecution for perverting the course of justice by trying to hide the contents of a senior reporter’s desk after he was arrested earlier this year.

NI originally claimed the archive of emails did not exist.

Last December, its Scottish editor, Bob Bird, told the trial of Tommy Sheridan in Glasgow that the emails had been lost en route to Mumbai. Also in December, the company’s solicitor, Julian Pike from Farrer and Co, gave a statement to the high court saying it was unable to retrieve emails more than six months old.

The first hint that this was not true came in late January when NI handed Scotland Yard evidence that led to the immediate sacking of its news editor, Ian Edmondson, and to the launch of Operation Weeting. It was reported that this evidence consisted of three old emails.

Three months later, on March 23, Pike formally apologised to the high court and acknowledged News International could locate emails as far back as 2005 and that no emails had been lost en route to Mumbai or anywhere else in India. In a signed statement seen by the Guardian, Pike said he had been misinformed by the NoW’s in-house lawyer, Tom Crone, who had told him that he, too, had been misled. He offered no explanation for the misleading evidence given by Bird.


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Posted 19 July 2011 - 03:01 PM

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-12296392

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18 July 2011 Last updated at 16:36 GMT Share this pageEmail Print Share this page

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Phone hacking: The main playersKey figures
Victims and possible victims


Claims of phone hacking at the News of the World have thrust the newspaper's owners, News Corporation, its UK arm, News International, and its journalists directly into the spotlight. Police have identified more than 4,000 possible victims. A separate Scotland Yard investigation is also looking into claims of inappropriate payments made to police.

Hacking scandal: Key figures
Name Job/position Connection to phone-hacking investigation
Rupert Murdoch
Chief exec, News Corporation

The NoW was part of Rupert Murdoch's News International newspaper group - itself the UK arm of the media mogul's News Corporation global empire. The 80-year-old Australian-American boss flew into the UK to take charge of dealing with the phone-hacking crisis. He will appear before MPs to answer questions on the phone-hacking scandal on 19 July.

Read full profile

Rebekah Brooks (nee Wade)
Former chief exec, News International


News International's former chief executive and former NoW editor. Mrs Brooks was the NoW editor when voicemails of murdered schoolgirl Milly Dowler's mobile phone were allegedly intercepted. She will appear before MPs to answer questions on the phone-hacking scandal on 19 July. Mrs Brooks was arrested on 17 July 2011 over phone hacking and corruption allegations.

Read full profile

James Murdoch
Chairman, News International

Rupert Murdoch's son James is News International's current chairman. He has reiterated the company is fully co-operating with police investigations and he was not, until recently, in the picture about the full extent of wrongdoing at the NoW. Announcing the closure of the Sunday tabloid, he said the allegations were "shocking and hugely regrettable". He will appear before MPs to answer questions on the phone-hacking scandal on 19 July.

Read full profile

Les Hinton
Former chief exec, Dow Jones

Les Hinton was chief executive of News Corp's financial news service Dow Jones, publisher of the Wall Street Journal. One of Rupert Murdoch's top executives, Mr Hinton had worked with him for more than five decades. Announcing he was quitting, he said he was "ignorant of what apparently happened" but felt it was proper to resign. Mr Murdoch said it brought him "great sadness".

Read More

Andy Coulson
NoW editor 2003-07

Andy Coulson, who was NoW editor between 2003-07, resigned his position following the convictions of ex-NoW royal editor Clive Goodman and private investigator Glenn Mulcaire for phone hacking. He later became Prime Minister David Cameron's spokesman but quit in January 2011 saying ongoing hacking claims were distracting him from his job. Mr Coulson was arrested in July 2011 and later bailed over phone hacking and corruption allegations.

Read full profile

Glenn Mulcaire
Private investigator

Employed by the NoW, Glenn Mulcaire, 40, was jailed in January 2007 for phone hacking. He admitted unlawfully intercepting voicemail messages received by three royal aides. He was also convicted of hacking the phones of a number of other public figures, including publicist Max Clifford and actress Elle Macpherson. In July 2011, allegations emerged he had also hacked into murdered schoolgirl Milly Dowler's mobile phone and had the phone numbers of relatives of service personnel killed in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Read full profile

Clive Goodman
Ex-NoW royal editor


The former NoW royal editor was jailed for four months in 2007 for phone hacking. He admitted unlawfully intercepting hundreds of telephone voicemail messages received by three members of staff at Buckingham Palace. The investigation was sparked after Prince William became suspicious about a November 2005 NoW story about a knee injury. In July 2011, Goodman, 53, was again arrested and released on bail on suspicion of corruption.

Read more

Other journalists
Name Job/position Connection to phone-hacking investigation
Ian Edmondson
Ex-NoW assistant editor (news)

The former NoW assistant editor was identified in court documents as having instructed private investigator Glenn Mulcaire to access phone messages. He was sacked from the paper after an internal inquiry had found "highly damaging evidence", a source said. He was arrested in April 2011 on suspicion of unlawfully intercepting mobile phone voicemail messages, and was released on bail until September 2011.

Read more

Neville Thurlbeck
Ex-NoW chief reporter


Neville Thurlbeck, former chief reporter at the NoW, was named by Labour MP Tom Watson in January 2011 as one of three journalists who should be investigated. In 2009, police told MPs he had not been interviewed because there was no evidence linking him to the case. He was arrested in April 2011 on suspicion of unlawfully intercepting mobile phone voicemail messages, and released on bail until September 2011.

Read more

James Weatherup
Ex-NoW reporter


The former NoW reporter and news editor was arrested on 14 April on suspicion of conspiracy to unlawfully intercept communications. He was released on bail until September 2011.

Read more

Neil Wallis
Ex-NoW deputy editor


Mr Wallis was arrested by police on 14 July on suspicion of conspiring to intercept communications. His media consultancy company - Chamy Media - was used by the Met Police from October 2009 until September 2010.

Read more

Terenia Taras
Freelance journalist


The freelance journalist was arrested on 23 June and later bailed as part of investigations into phone hacking.

Read more

Unnamed 63-year-old man
Role unknown


The unnamed man was arrested on 8 July and later bailed as part of investigations into phone hacking and corruption.

Read more

Sean Hoare
Ex-NoW reporter

The former NoW journalist publicly admitted his part in phone hacking. He told the New York Times the practice of phone hacking was far more extensive than the newspaper acknowledged when police first investigated the case. He also told the BBC's Panorama it was "endemic" at the paper. Mr Hoare also said, as editor, Andy Coulson had asked him to hack phones. Mr Coulson has denied any knowledge of hacking. Mr Hoare was found dead in his home on 18 July 2011.

Read more

Paul McMullan
Ex-NoW deputy features editor

The NoW deputy features editor between 1994 and 2001, Mr McMullan has spoken about the use of phone hacking on the paper, describing its investigations department as a "den of vipers".

Watch the interview

Alex Marunchak
Ex-NoW Irish edition editor

The former NoW Irish edition editor obtained e-mails hacked into by a private detective in 2006, according to the BBC's Panorama. The messages belonged to an ex-British intelligence officer. Mr Marunchak denies receiving "any unlawfully obtained material".

The Metropolitan Police has said that Mr Marunchak worked for them as a part-time Ukrainian translator during his time at the paper.

Read more

Police officers involved in hacking inquiry
Name Job/position Connection to phone-hacking investigation
Sir Paul Stephenson
Former Met Police Commissioner


Britain's most senior police officer faced criticism for hiring former News of the World executive Neil Wallis - who was questioned by police investigating hacking - as a PR adviser. Sir Paul eventually said his links to the journalist could hamper investigations and resigned.

Read more

John Yates
Former Met Police Assistant Commissioner


Assistant Commissioner Yates ruled out a further inquiry into the phone-hacking scandal in 2009. He has since expressed "extreme regret" for not reopening the investigation. He resigned on 18 July.

Read more

Sue Akers
Met Police Deputy Assistant Commissioner

The current police hacking investigation, called Operation Weeting, is being led by Sue Akers.

Under her lead, detectives are contacting nearly 4,000 people whose personal details were stored by private investigator Glenn Mulcaire.

Read more

Andy Hayman
Former Met Police Assistant Commissioner

Andy Hayman was involved in the original hacking inquiry. MPs have criticised his handling of the investigation. He denies there has been anything "improper" about his decision to write columns for News International after he retired from the Met.

Read more

More on This Story
Phone-hacking scandal News and analysis
Phone-hacking row as it happened: 18 July A report of the latest twists and turns as more allegations in the phone-hacking scandal emerged.
Yates quits Met amid hacking row MPs delay break to debate hacking The MPs who will quiz the Murdochs Call to cut back Murdoch empire What next for News Corp? Q&A: Phone-hacking scandal Timeline New era for politics and media? 'Watergate-scale' scandal Challenges faced by News Corp? Murdoch's media empire Demise of News of the World
Insider's account The birth and death of the NoW In pictures: The News of the World Paper Monitor: Final edition Profiles
Rupert Murdoch James Murdoch Andy Coulson Rebekah Brooks Glenn Mulcaire Video and Audio
Cash question angers Hayman
Watch BskyB bid referred to regulator
Watch Brooks backed by Murdoch
Watch Secret taping: Brooks at NoW
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#8 User is offline   BLURB 

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Posted 19 July 2011 - 08:09 PM

Everytime I see it on the News I say to myself .... yes, that'll be happening with ACC and all their toadies in the very near future

Cheers for posting and updating this thread Hu kild da spida

Be interesting to see how the rest of the story unfolds, and ends.

:P
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#9 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 19 July 2011 - 09:57 PM

Staggering to think that the Police are not up to the minute on training staff how to detect how easy & cunning phone/electronic hacking is done by these damn crooks and others like them.

One doesn't need to be "rocket scientist" to know it has gone on for years by Private Investigators and other lowlife scum.

It ranks as low as going through people's private rubbish, and following and watching people trying to go about their daily lives.

We all know http://www.acc.co.nz and it's contracted Private Investigator agents have destroyed people's wellbeing and careers with their lowlife obsessions to innocent people's lives.

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#10 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 19 July 2011 - 10:04 PM

News of the World Private Investigator Arrested In Connection with Phone-Hacking Scandal

http://m.ibtimes.com...ing-176904.html

By MYLES MILLER, METRO CORRESPONDENT
News of the World Private Investigator Arrested In Connection with Phone-Hacking Scandal

A private investigator used by News of the World who allegedly paid police for information regarding stories, was arrested in Surrey Friday.

Metropolitan Police announced the arrest of a man in connection with Operation Elveden, what investigators are calling the investigations into inappropriate payments to police as part of the phone-hacking scandal.

The Met said in a statement "The Metropolitan Police Service has this evening [8 July 2011] arrested a member of the public in connection with allegations of corruption.

At 20:22 hrs officers from the MPS' Operation Weeting together with officers from Op Elveden arrested a man on suspicion of corruption allegations contrary to Section 1 of the Prevention of Corruption Act 1906. The man, age 63, was arrested at a residential address in Surrey.

A search is ongoing at this address. The Operation Weeting team is conducting the new investigation into phone hacking. Operation Elveden is the investigation into allegations of inappropriate payments to police. This investigation is being supervised by the IPCC."

British Prime Minister David Cameron on Friday called for a new investigation into the News of the World and tighter regulations of the press after police arrested his former communications director.

Rupert Murdoch's soon-to-close News of the World has been under public scrutiny as surfacing allegations of questionable practices on the part of its journalists continue to unfold.

The newspaper, which is said to be Britain's best-selling Sunday paper, is set to close on Sunday. The closure came on the heels of a growing phone-hacking scandal alleging that journalists hacked the voicemail of a murdered teen, soldiers who were killed in Iraq and Afghanistan, and those died in the "7/7" terror attacks in London in 2005.

"The whole country has been shocked by the revelations of the phone hacking scandal," Cameron said at a press conference on the scandal, according to a Politico report. "I cannot think what was going through the mind of the people who did this."

Police allege Andy Coulson, the paper's former top editor who was until earlier this year Cameron's communications director, may be among them, and arrested him Friday morning "on suspicion of conspiring to intercept communications" and "on suspicion of corruption allegations," the Metropolitan Police Service said in a statement.

Politico reported that at a press conference that ended before Coulson was arrested, Cameron was repeatedly asked why he hired Coulson. Coulson stepped down from his job at the paper in 2007 following the conviction of one of the paper's reporters for hacking-related charges, according to Politico.

"The decision to hire him was mine and mine alone and I take responsibility for it," Cameron said, according to the Politico article. "He said at the time he didn't know what was happening on his watch. I took the decision -- my decision, my decision alone -- to give him a second chance. That's what happened. I don't think it's particularly meaningful today to put a different gloss on it. People will judge me for that, I understand that."

Cameron called for a second investigation of the phone-hacking scandal and said the one being done by police is "inadequate," Politico reported.

Cameron also said that News International, a subsidiary of Murdoch's News Corp., which runs News of the World, should have accepted the resignation of company executive Rebekah Brooks, Politico reported.

Brooks was an editor of the paper when some of the hackings happened and who is a personal friend of Cameron's, according to the Politico article.

"It has been reported she offered her resignation over this and in this situation I would have taken it," Cameron said, as reported by Politico.
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#11 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 19 July 2011 - 10:25 PM

Chaos at the Yard as Yates resigns and more officers face allegations

http://www.independe...ns-2315874.html

By Martin Hickman, Matt Blake and Cahal Milmo

Tuesday, 19 July 2011


John Yates hit out at 'inaccurate, ill-informed and on occasion downright malicious gossip'

Jeremt Selwyn

John Yates hit out at 'inaccurate, ill-informed and on occasion downright malicious gossip'

Photos enlarge

John Yates, formerly Britain's most senior counter-terrorism officer, was last night being investigated by the Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) over allegations he gave a job to the daughter of Neil Wallis, the former tabloid executive arrested last week over phone hacking.

As Scotland Yard was plunged into crisis with two high-profile resignations in 24 hours, the IPCC launched an inquiry into "serious allegations" about the conduct of four high-ranking Metropolitan Police officers, including Sir Paul Stephenson – who resigned as Met Commissioner on Sunday – and Mr Yates, who resigned as Assistant Commissioner yesterday.

Two other former senior Scotland Yard officers, understood to be former Deputy Assistant Commissioner Peter Clarke and former Assistant Commissioner Andy Hayman, are also the subject of the investigation, which was triggered by a wide-ranging complaint from the Metropolitan Police Authority, which governs London's police force.
Related articles

Murdochs in the dock
'Murdoch death' hackers target Sun website
Hacking whistleblower found dead at his home
Police examine computer found near Brooks' flat
Commissioner versus the PM: who is in the right?
Steve Richards: Everything has changed, but most politicians don't realise it
Dominic Lawson: Who runs the country? Not Murdoch
Leading article: Public confidence and a crisis that is too good to waste
David Prosser: Why James Murdoch must step down as chairman of BSkyB
Cameron flies in as further meeting with Brooks emerges
'Too good for London', Stephenson will find a welcome at the Kettledrum's bar
Major challenges lie ahead for the next commissioner
Value of News Corp plunges as investors take fright at scandal
The Met's chief of spin faces difficult questions
Simon Carr: Baldwin weakens Miliband's call for Cameron's scalp
Tom Sutcliffe: MPs should beware the tempting limelight
Boris goes off-message
Deborah Ross: How much joy in others' misery can I take?
Search the news archive for more stories

The IPPC said it had been called in to investigate Sir Paul's handling of the phone-hacking investigation and Mr Yates's review of the investigation in 2009 and "his alleged involvement in inappropriately securing employment for the daughter of a friend".

Its inquiry came last night at the end of another turbulent day for the country's biggest police force, which has been severely criticised for its failure to investigate the News of the World's apparently extensive hacking of the phones of public figures. In a development likely to raise more questions for police, it was revealed last night that Alex Marunchak, formerly head of the News of the World in Ireland, was carrying out potentially sensitive work for Scotland Yard while he was still a reporter at the News of the World.

Between 1980 and 2000, Mr Marunchak was on a list of interpreters used by the Metropolitan Police to provide translation and interpretation services for victims.

A statement from the Met said it had found Mr Marunchak had carried out a total of 27 hours of work on a freelance basis since 1996, when the records system became electronic, and it was likely he undertook work prior to 1996.

On Sunday night, Sir Paul resigned hours before a Commons statement on Scotland Yard, saying he could no longer remain in office because of questions about his links to Mr Wallis. He also fired a parting shot at David Cameron for employing Andy Coulson, Mr Wallis's former editor at the NOTW.

Yesterday Mr Yates resigned shortly after being told that he was about to be suspended. He insisted in a statement that he had done nothing wrong. "I have acted with complete integrity and my conscience is clear," he said.

"As I have said very recently, it is a matter of great personal regret that those potentially affected by phone hacking were not dealt with appropriately. Sadly, there continues to be a huge amount of inaccurate, ill-informed and on occasion downright malicious gossip published about me personally. This has the potential to be a significant distraction in my current role as the national lead for counter terrorism."

Mr Yates's resignation came after a leading member of the Metropolitan Police Authority, Dee Doocey, had described his review of the phone-hacking case two years ago as "a monumental error of judgement".

After only eight hours' work two years ago, Mr Yates had deemed satisfactory the investigation carried out in 2006 into phone hacking by his predecessor, Andy Hayman.

Mr Yates admitted earlier this month that he had not inspected 11,000 pages of the notes seized from the NOTW's private investigator Glenn Mulcaire which showed, according to the current police investigation Operation Weeting, that he had almost 4,000 likely victims.

Baroness Doocey, a long-standing critic of the Met's handling of phone hacking, said: "Hundreds of victims of phone hacking were failed and his resignation is long overdue. He made a monumental error of judgement which rendered his position untenable."

Jenny Jones, another member of the MPA, criticised Sir Paul's behaviour, saying there were times when he "treated the Police Authority with contempt."

Isn't the owner/ Director of Paragon Risk, Private Investigations who has used a large variety of company names a former Scotland Yard Constable?

http://accforum.org/...-risk-contract/

Maybe it's time some real Detective work was done into those whom work as Private Investigators in New Zealand in light of what has gone on in the UK.

Does there paperwork for costs etc get scrutinized as thoroughly as it should have been?

May we suggest those whom have been subjected to 'Fraud allegations and Investigations' request an IT Sweep of all files relating to them and copies of mileage and expenses etc that the Private Investigations company concerned have claimed, including http://www.ird.govt.nz/

We are entitled to know our http://www.acc.co.nz levies, which are our Public Funds, are being disbursed for the purposes they are designated for, not to line that of greedy, bludging failed police officers who took early retirement to go onto similiar careers.

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#12 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 19 July 2011 - 10:33 PM

View Posthukildaspida, on 19 July 2011 - 10:25 PM, said:

Chaos at the Yard as Yates resigns and more officers face allegations

http://www.independe...ns-2315874.html

By Martin Hickman, Matt Blake and Cahal Milmo

Tuesday, 19 July 2011


John Yates hit out at 'inaccurate, ill-informed and on occasion downright malicious gossip'

Jeremt Selwyn

John Yates hit out at 'inaccurate, ill-informed and on occasion downright malicious gossip'

Photos enlarge

John Yates, formerly Britain's most senior counter-terrorism officer, was last night being investigated by the Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) over allegations he gave a job to the daughter of Neil Wallis, the former tabloid executive arrested last week over phone hacking.

As Scotland Yard was plunged into crisis with two high-profile resignations in 24 hours, the IPCC launched an inquiry into "serious allegations" about the conduct of four high-ranking Metropolitan Police officers, including Sir Paul Stephenson – who resigned as Met Commissioner on Sunday – and Mr Yates, who resigned as Assistant Commissioner yesterday.

Two other former senior Scotland Yard officers, understood to be former Deputy Assistant Commissioner Peter Clarke and former Assistant Commissioner Andy Hayman, are also the subject of the investigation, which was triggered by a wide-ranging complaint from the Metropolitan Police Authority, which governs London's police force.
Related articles

Murdochs in the dock
'Murdoch death' hackers target Sun website
Hacking whistleblower found dead at his home
Police examine computer found near Brooks' flat
Commissioner versus the PM: who is in the right?
Steve Richards: Everything has changed, but most politicians don't realise it
Dominic Lawson: Who runs the country? Not Murdoch
Leading article: Public confidence and a crisis that is too good to waste
David Prosser: Why James Murdoch must step down as chairman of BSkyB
Cameron flies in as further meeting with Brooks emerges
'Too good for London', Stephenson will find a welcome at the Kettledrum's bar
Major challenges lie ahead for the next commissioner
Value of News Corp plunges as investors take fright at scandal
The Met's chief of spin faces difficult questions
Simon Carr: Baldwin weakens Miliband's call for Cameron's scalp
Tom Sutcliffe: MPs should beware the tempting limelight
Boris goes off-message
Deborah Ross: How much joy in others' misery can I take?
Search the news archive for more stories

The IPPC said it had been called in to investigate Sir Paul's handling of the phone-hacking investigation and Mr Yates's review of the investigation in 2009 and "his alleged involvement in inappropriately securing employment for the daughter of a friend".

Its inquiry came last night at the end of another turbulent day for the country's biggest police force, which has been severely criticised for its failure to investigate the News of the World's apparently extensive hacking of the phones of public figures. In a development likely to raise more questions for police, it was revealed last night that Alex Marunchak, formerly head of the News of the World in Ireland, was carrying out potentially sensitive work for Scotland Yard while he was still a reporter at the News of the World.

Between 1980 and 2000, Mr Marunchak was on a list of interpreters used by the Metropolitan Police to provide translation and interpretation services for victims.

A statement from the Met said it had found Mr Marunchak had carried out a total of 27 hours of work on a freelance basis since 1996, when the records system became electronic, and it was likely he undertook work prior to 1996.

On Sunday night, Sir Paul resigned hours before a Commons statement on Scotland Yard, saying he could no longer remain in office because of questions about his links to Mr Wallis. He also fired a parting shot at David Cameron for employing Andy Coulson, Mr Wallis's former editor at the NOTW.

Yesterday Mr Yates resigned shortly after being told that he was about to be suspended. He insisted in a statement that he had done nothing wrong. "I have acted with complete integrity and my conscience is clear," he said.

"As I have said very recently, it is a matter of great personal regret that those potentially affected by phone hacking were not dealt with appropriately. Sadly, there continues to be a huge amount of inaccurate, ill-informed and on occasion downright malicious gossip published about me personally. This has the potential to be a significant distraction in my current role as the national lead for counter terrorism."

Mr Yates's resignation came after a leading member of the Metropolitan Police Authority, Dee Doocey, had described his review of the phone-hacking case two years ago as "a monumental error of judgement".

After only eight hours' work two years ago, Mr Yates had deemed satisfactory the investigation carried out in 2006 into phone hacking by his predecessor, Andy Hayman.

Mr Yates admitted earlier this month that he had not inspected 11,000 pages of the notes seized from the NOTW's private investigator Glenn Mulcaire which showed, according to the current police investigation Operation Weeting, that he had almost 4,000 likely victims.

Baroness Doocey, a long-standing critic of the Met's handling of phone hacking, said: "Hundreds of victims of phone hacking were failed and his resignation is long overdue. He made a monumental error of judgement which rendered his position untenable."

Jenny Jones, another member of the MPA, criticised Sir Paul's behaviour, saying there were times when he "treated the Police Authority with contempt."

Isn't the owner/ Director of Paragon Risk, Private Investigations who has used a large variety of company names a former Scotland Yard Constable?

http://accforum.org/...-risk-contract/

Maybe it's time so real Detective work was done into those whom work as Private Investigators in New Zealand in light of what has gone on in the UK.

Does there paperwork for costs etc get scrutinized as thoroughly as it should have been?

May we suggest those whom have been subjected to 'Fraud allegations and Investigations' request an IT Sweep of all files relating to them and copies of mileage and expanses etc that the Private Investigations company concerned have claimed.

We are entitled to know our http://www.acc.co.nz levies, which are our Public Funds, are being disbursed for the purposes they are designated for, not to line that of greedy, bludging failed police officers who took early retirement to go onto similiar careers.





Peter Clarke


http://www.powerbase...lice_officer%29

Peter Clarke (Police officer)
Peter Clarke
Peter John Michael Clarke (born 27 July 1955) is a former police commander who headed Scotland Yard’s Anti-Terrorism Branch from June 2002 and its successor organisation the Counter Terrorism Command, until his retirement in February 2008. He became the face of the UK police’s counterterrorism operations following the July 2005 London bombings and has been one of the most widely quoted ‘terrorism experts’ in the media.
Contents
[hide]

1 Education and Career
1.1 After retirement
2 Electoral Intervention
3 Media presence
4 References

Education and Career

Peter Clarke was born on 27 July 1955. He joined the Metropolitan Police in 1977 after graduating in Law from Bristol University. In the early part of his career he worked at a number of locations in London in both uniform and detective roles, including periods on murder enquiries and in international drugs intelligence. [1]

There followed postings in strategic planning, as operations head in a central London division, and as Staff Officer to the Commissioner.

In 1993 he was appointed a staff officer to Met Commissioner Paul Condon, [2] and in 1994 he became the Commander of Brixton Division in South London. [3] From April 1995 to January 1996 he was a director of Brixton Challenge Company Ltd, [4] which was set up in 1993 to manage a five-year regeneration programme for the Brixton area, funded by a £37.5 million ‘city challenge’ government grant. [5]

In 1996 Clarke was promoted to a Commander in Specialist Operations Department at Scotland Yard. [6] In 1997 he assumed command of the Royalty and Diplomatic Protection Department, with responsibility for the protection and security of the Royal Family and their residences, the diplomatic community in London and the Houses of Parliament. [7]

In June 2000 he became the Deputy Director of Personnel for the Metropolitan Police, and in June 2002 was appointed as Head of the Anti-Terrorist Branch at New Scotland Yard and National Co-ordinator of Terrorist Investigations. [8] On 2 October 2006 the Anti-Terrorist Branch was merged with Special Branch to form the Counter Terrorism Command, which was led by Clarke. [9] The new body developed closer relations with the secret service, [10] with Clarke acting ‘as the interface between the police and MI5’. [11]

Clarke attended the Royal College of Defence Studies in 2002, was made a Commander of the Royal Victorian Order in 2001 and awarded the Queen’s Police Medal in 2003. In 2006 he was made an OBE. [12]

Clarke attended the International Terrorism and Intelligence conferences in 2005 and 2006. Both conferences were held at the Royal College of Defence Studies on Belgrave Square, and hosted by the Centre for the Study of Terrorism and Political Violence of the University of St. Andrews. [13]

On 20 September 2007 Scotland Yard announced that Clarke would step down in January 2008. [14] Clarke’s retirement was delayed for a month as he stood in for his immediate superior Andy Hayman who retired amid allegations of an improper relationship with an official of the Independent Police Complaints Commission. [15] Clarke retired in February 2008. [16]
After retirement

On 29 April 2008 Clarke was appointed a director of the Crimestoppers Trust, [17] the website of which is sponsored by the Security Industry Authority.

Clarke is a Fellow of the Center on Law and Security at the New York University School of Law. Other Fellows include the terrorism expert Peter Bergen and his collaborator Paul Cruickshank – both of whom are affiliated to the School of Advanced International Studies at Johns Hopkins University – and Sidney Blumenthal, a journalist and former advisor to Bill Clinton.
Electoral Intervention

In May 2010 Clarke was a signatory of a letter to The Times criticising Liberal Democrat defence and security policies two days before the General Election. The letter criticised the Liberal Democrats for threatening a ‘long-standing cross party consensus about national security.’ In particular it criticised the Liberal Democrats for making ‘no reference to North Korea’ or to Nato in their manifesto, for allegedly advocating ‘a much more distant relationship’ with the US, and for suggesting that they might scrap control orders (under which suspects can be kept under effective house arrest without charge) and Britain’s commitment to developing new nuclear weapons.

The letter argued that, ‘An enhanced European defence and security posture, however welcome, cannot substitute for American power.’ [18] The letter was also signed by Richard Dearlove, the former head of MI6, and Charles Guthrie, a former Chief of Defence Staff and SAS Colonel Commandant. [19]
Media presence

At an event hosted by the right-wing think-tank Policy Exchange, Clarke recalled how after the July 2005 London bomb attacks he had become, "the face of the investigation," and described how he saw his role as, "explaining to the public what had happened. Not speculating, but describing the facts as I knew them, but only when we knew them to provable standards." [20]

As Clarke's comments suggest, he has had a substantial presence in the media, both as a commentator on specific police investigations and as a commentator on terrorism and security issues more generally. We tracked the names of 435 Terrorism Experts for appearances in major world newspapers between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2007. Of the 435 'experts' we tracked, Clarke was the fourth most cited, with his name returning 1180 articles. [21]

Terrorism Spin portal editors also tracked appearances by Terrorism Experts on UK Television during the same period. [22] Of the 435 'experts' we tracked, Clarke was the most cited on British TV, appearing a total of 151 times; 85 on ITN and Channel 4 News Items and 66 times BBC News and Current Affairs programmes. [23]
References

↑ Peter Clarke, Assistant Commissioner Specialist Operations Metropolitan Police website (accessed 2 May 2008)
↑ Sean O’Neill, ‘Wanted, a new chief to fight al-Qaeda’, The Times, 21 September 2007
↑ Peter Clarke, Assistant Commissioner Specialist Operations Metropolitan Police website (accessed 2 May 2008)
↑ Companies House, Current, Resigned & Dissolved Appointments of Peter John Michael Clarke (Date of Birth 27 July 1955) (accessed 28 November 2008)
↑ ‘Letter: Taking a look beyond the violence and riots of Brixton’, The Times, 22 December 1995
↑ Sean O’Neill, ‘Wanted, a new chief to fight al-Qaeda’, The Times, 21 September 2007
↑ Peter Clarke, Assistant Commissioner Specialist Operations Metropolitan Police website (accessed 2 May 2008)
↑ Peter Clarke, Assistant Commissioner Specialist Operations Metropolitan Police website (accessed 2 May 2008)
↑ Peter Clarke, Assistant Commissioner Specialist Operations Metropolitan Police website (accessed 2 May 2008)
↑ Sean O’Neill, ‘Wanted, a new chief to fight al-Qaeda’, The Times, 21 September 2007
↑ ’Profile: Peter Clarke, The Guardian, 3 July 2007
↑ Peter Clarke, Assistant Commissioner Specialist Operations Metropolitan Police website (accessed 2 May 2008)
↑ International Terrorism and Intelligence 2005 Conference Programme (PDF); International Terrorism and Intelligence 2006 Conference Programme (PDF)
↑ Sean O’Neill, ‘Wanted, a new chief to fight al-Qaeda’, The Times, 21 September 2007
↑ John Steele, ‘Profile: Andy Hayman’, Telegraph.co.uk, 6 December 2007
↑ Andrew Porter, ‘Terror law should allow 42 days' detention, says former police chief’, Telegraph.co.uk, 3 June 2008
↑ Companies House, Current, Resigned & Dissolved Appointments of Peter Clarke (Date of Birth 27 July 1955) (accessed 28 November 2008)
↑ ‘Letter: Lib Dems and national security’, The Times, 4 May 2010.
↑ ‘Letter: Lib Dems and national security’, The Times, 4 May 2010.
↑ Metropolitan Police, DAC Peter Clark's speech on counter terrorism, at the first Colin Cramphorn Memorial Lecture hosted by Policy Exchange, 24 April 2007
↑ see Major World Newspapers List
↑ 435 names from the Bulk List were searched at the archives of the BBC Motion Gallery and ITN Source for appearances on ITN, Channel 4, BBC News and BBC Current Affairs programmes. Only appearances relating to terrorism were recorded. Any items referring to ‘terror’, ‘Islamic fundamentalism’, ‘extremism’ or ‘suicide bombing’ were treated as relating to terrorism.
↑ see UK Television List

Categories: Terrorologist | UK Police Intelligence | Metropolitan Police | Terrorism Spin

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#13 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 19 July 2011 - 10:45 PM

Andy Hayman ex Police officer

Mysterious L-plates for the red Capri... how his first wife rumbled the philandering Andy Hayman

By Amanda Perthen

Last updated at 11:18 PM on 16th July 2011

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Heard it all before: Jayne Harman says her former husband Andy's indignant reaction to the MPs grilling was similar to when she quizzed him about suspected affairs

Heard it all before: Jayne Harman says her former husband Andy's indignant reaction to the MPs grilling was similar to when she quizzed him about suspected affairs

Like an echo from the past, there was something very familiar about former police chief Andy Hayman’s outraged indignation during his grilling by MPs last week.

At least that’s what his former wife Jayne thought as she watched him on TV. Particularly when one MP asked whether Mr Hayman had ever taken a bung. ‘Good God. Absolutely not,’ he erupted.

The last time Jayne Hayman heard him react in such a way was in the Eighties when she accused him – correctly, as it turned out – of having an affair with a 23-year-old hairdresser called Audrey.

Jayne confronted her husband after finding the name written on a piece of paper which had fallen out of the Bible she kept on her dressing table. Weeks later, she discovered a set of L-plates hidden in the boot of his cherished red Ford Capri.

Recalling the incident when she found the scrap of paper, Jayne said: ‘He behaved in exactly the same way [as he did when he appeared before MPs], issuing a stream of denials and being very indignant that I had accused him.

‘It was such a convincing performance that I believed him. He told me that Audrey was a police informant. It took me some months to find out that it was all lies.’


More...

Rebekah Brooks in line for £3.5m pay out as News International slaps gagging orders on chief executives (apart from that inquiry on Tuesday)
'Hacking of Jude Law in New York' leaves Murdoch's struggling American empire open to fresh prosecution
Family at war: As the phone hacking scandal deepens, simmering tensions threaten to explode in the Murdoch dynasty
Why did Prince William's lawyers hide hacking evidence? Firm that advises Royals entangled in row over 'cover up'

The couple’s marriage ended after four years but Jayne, now 47, has followed Hayman’s career from afar.

When they met he was a lowly constable in Essex, desperate to make the step up to sergeant. In fact, he would go on to reach the higher echelons of Scotland Yard as an assistant commissioner.

Hayman came to public prominence after leading the investigation into the July 7 bombings in London, the shooting of Jean Charles de Menezes at Stockwell Tube station, and the disastrous original inquiry into phone-hacking by the News of the World.
Short-lived: Jayne, with Andy Hayman, says her former husband has not changed one iota and is still argumentative

Short-lived: Jayne, with Andy Hayman, says her former husband has not changed one iota and is still argumentative

For Jayne, his grilling last week by the Commons Home Affairs Committee probing the scandal brought back memories of the time she made him squirm with her own questions.

‘He hasn’t changed one iota – his mannerisms, his argumentative ways, his indignation when challenged, all the talk,’ she said.

In an interview with The Mail on Sunday, Jayne reveals details of their short-lived marriage and delivers a telling insight into the makings of one of Britain’s most senior policemen.

Viewed from a distance of nearly 30 years, there is much in Hayman’s early career that would strike a chord with viewers of the BBC’s hit drama Life On Mars, which featured macho detective Gene Hunt. While DCI Hunt drove a gold Ford Cortina, Hayman loved getting behind the wheel of his thrusting three-litre Capri.

‘He used to cruise up and down the seafront at Leigh-on-Sea with the window down and his arm on the ledge. It was very powerful and he loved it,’ laughed Jayne.

It was certainly more potent than his previous vehicle – a mustard-coloured Mini Traveller with wood trim and a number plate containing the unfortunate letter combination POO.
'Like John Travolta': Jayne says her former husband was a 'charmer who had a dashing moustache'

'Like John Travolta': Jayne says her former husband was a 'charmer who had a dashing moustache'

When the couple first met in 1983 – at the Crooked Billet pub in Leigh-on-Sea where Jayne worked as a part-time barmaid – she was 18 and Hayman was a 24-year-old ‘charmer’ who sported a ‘dashing moustache’.

In his spare time, he also worked as DJ, taking his mobile disco to a holiday camp on Canvey Island.

Jayne said: ‘He was definitely a ladies’ man and liked to think of himself as a snappy dresser. But he was no John Travolta on the dancefloor. He just used to get up and give it a go.

‘But Andy’s passion was always the police force – he lived and breathed it. I always knew he would go far.

‘He used to love Saturday nights when all the rogues were out and he had to catch them. He liked not wearing a uniform because he could do more things without being noticed – such as chatting up women, probably.

‘When I saw him on TV last week, I felt proud of him. Despite us splitting up, I’m not bitter.’
Indignant: Former Assistant Commissioner Andy Hayman was outraged when MPs grilled him

Indignant: Former Assistant Commissioner Andy Hayman was outraged when MPs grilled him

Hayman proposed six months after they met. ‘Andy was wonderful with my mother, who was dying of cancer. We organised the wedding in just three weeks. He said, “I know you want your mother to be there, so let’s bring the date forward”,’ she said.

They wed in March 1984 but their first year of marriage was difficult, with Hayman working long shifts and Jayne by now busy with her job at Midland Bank.

She said: ‘I suppose that’s why things went wrong. It wasn’t really Andy’s fault. He had an affair, but I was pushing him away. I was still grieving for my mother and also working hard at the bank. I feel such a fool now. I believed him over the Bible episode and let the matter rest.

‘He was indignant and said, “How dare you accuse me of having an affair,” so I didn’t question him further.’
Hot wheels: Andy Hayman loved the power he got from cruising around Leigh-on-Sea in his Ford Capri

Hot wheels: Andy Hayman loved the power he got from cruising around Leigh-on-Sea in his Ford Capri

But a few weeks later Jayne became suspicious again when she discovered the L-plates.

‘He told me he was teaching the wife of one of his colleagues to drive because if her husband took her out, they would argue. I was annoyed – I said if she wrecks the car, we will have to pay for it on our insurance.’

Hayman obviously took this point to heart because a few weeks later a letter arrived demanding an extra insurance payment of £14 to cover a named woman driver – the same name that Jayne had seen on the slip of paper.

‘I was furious and realised something was going on,’ she said. ‘I begged Andy to be honest and tell me who she was. He said she was a hairdresser and that he had met her while he was DJing on Canvey Island because she worked there part-time as a dancer.
Phone tapping

‘He told me it was over and that she meant nothing to him, but things were never the same after that – I didn’t trust him any more. I was distraught. I was still grieving for my mother and had no one I felt I could confide in.’

The lowest point came when Hayman said he would not be spending Christmas Day with her. Jayne recalls: ‘We were supposed to be going out to dinner. How do you tell your friends you’re going to be on your own? It was the worst day of my life – I drank Pernod and lemonade and ate a whole tin of Quality Street. That’s all I had that day. I learnt later he had spent Christmas with her. It was the last straw.’
Reward

Even so, the couple’s relationship struggled on until February 1987 when Jayne moved her belongings out of the marital home.
CHAMPAGNE FOR JOURNALISTS HE WAS PROBING

Andy Hayman submitted an expense claim for a bottle of champagne he shared with a News of the World journalist – while he was investigating the paper over phone-hacking.

Earlier that day, he spent £600 on food and drink while entertaining senior officers.

Later, after his resignation in December 2007, he was employed at the Murdoch-owned Times newspaper as a columnist.

Mr Hayman told Home Affairs Select Committee MPs last week that it was unthinkable for him to have divulged any information about the phone-hacking investigation during meetings with News of the World editors.

The expense claims were uncovered during a Met probe in 2007. It is understood that when he was questioned about the champagne meeting, Mr Hayman said that it had been a debriefing about counter-terrorism.

He paid for the champagne with his Scotland Yard credit card, supposed to be used for necessary expenditure, not hospitality, and, according to a source, ‘certainly not alcohol’. Mr Hayman resigned following allegations about £19,000 – not £15,000, as has been reported – of expense claims and alleged improper conduct with a woman on the Independent Police Complaints Commission. He was later cleared of wrongdoing.

Assistant Commissioner John Yates has been criticised for not reopening the hacking inquiry in July 2009. He met News of the World editor Colin Myler for dinner in November that year. But Scotland Yard said that such social meetings are routine.

When she returned to the property a few weeks later to retrieve the last of her goods, she came face-to-face with Hayman.

Jayne said: ‘He asked me what I was doing and I said I was moving out. He stood in the hallway, pleading with me not to go. My last memory that day is him standing on the pavement, watching me disappear in my car.’

Despite their separation, Hayman was jealous of anyone she went on to date. On one occasion, he used his detective skills to track down her new boyfriend. Jayne said: ‘He found out his name, phone number and where he lived. He even came and sat outside his house and would ring the landline. I told him he had to stop. I was entitled to lead my life how I wanted because we were separated.’ The couple finally divorced in January 1988.

‘All I got from the settlement was £7,200 and the Mini Traveller. He got the house and the red Capri,’ Jayne added.

But for a fleeting glimpse of the her husband in Southend, she didn’t see him again.

During his interrogation by MPs last week, Mr Hayman was challenged about his private life, and reference was made to his involvement with two women, which led to a police investigation, followed by his resignation from Scotland Yard in 2007.

Referring to photographs of him with married civil servant Nikki Redmond, committee chairman Keith Vaz said: ‘There was some kind of deal done because of your personal life, that they [the News of the World] would not attack you if you supported them in this investigation?’

Hayman replied: ‘These are terribly grubby suggestions. How could I ever have stopped a line of investigation? I couldn’t, I wouldn’t.’ Meanwhile Jayne watched it all with a wry smile. ‘I can’t say I was in the least bit surprised.’

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#14 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 19 July 2011 - 11:10 PM

This newspaper heading should really read, "Why did News International & Clive Goodman choose the same Law firm as the Royal family?"

News International and Clive Goodman did after all choose Harbottle & Lewis after the Royal Family had developed a relationship with them, not the other way around.

A conflict of interest and as Senior Sergeant Secret Squirrell would say "^@#* covering".

Some of those whom have worked for News International have a lot to be desired.

Who's to say the skanks at News International & Clive Goodman weren't trying to discover other private information through devious ways?

For those whom aren't aware, Harbottle & Lewis are Privacy, Media/Entertainment & Personal Injury Lawyers amongst other areas of expertise.


Why did Prince William's lawyers hide hacking evidence? Firm that advises Royals entangled in row over 'cover up'

By Glen Owen

Last updated at 12:51 PM on 17th July 2011

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The Duke of Cambridge: Harbottle & Lewis advised the young royal and his wife on privacy during their courtship and marriage

The phone hacking scandal – which has already rocked the Murdoch empire, Downing Street and the police – last night threatened to drag in the Royal Family, after serious questions were asked about the conduct of their lawyers.

Harbottle & Lewis, a leading firm of London solicitors who act for Royals, including Prince Charles and the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, are embroiled in damaging accusations of a 'cover-up' and 'conflict of interest'.

The firm was hired to defend News International against claims of widespread hacking of the Royals – at the same time as its lawyers were working for Buckingham Palace.

Murdoch executives at the News of the World called in the firm following the jailing of Clive Goodman in January 2007 for intercepting mobile phone messages left for members of the Royal Family.

Mr Goodman, the paper's Royal editor, launched a claim for unfair dismissal against his former employers – on the grounds that the practice was widespread at the newspaper.

News International's decision to hire Harbottle & Lewis to defend his claim has raised eyebrows because the firm had also advised the Palace on Scotland Yard's investigation into Mr Goodman.

During its work for the company, Harbottle & Lewis took possession of hundreds of internal emails – which have now become the focus of the hacking firestorm.

Harbottle & Lewis's actions have come under intense scrutiny after it was revealed that it wrote a letter to News International in 2007 in which it stated – incorrectly, it now appears – that the emails did not reveal any evidence of criminality. The letter was used by newspaper executives in their defence during a Parliamentary investigation into phone hacking in 2009.


Hukildaspida says: Who was instructing and may have been misleading Harbottle & Lewis?

A senior legal source, who has seen the emails, told The Mail on Sunday it was 'manifestly untrue' that the emails did not reveal evidence of criminality.
Buckingham Palace, London: Harbottle & Lewis, a law firm which works on behalf of members of the Royal Family, have been embroiled in accusations of a 'cover up' at News International

Buckingham Palace, London: Harbottle & Lewis, a law firm which works on behalf of members of the Royal Family, have been embroiled in accusations of a 'cover up' at News International

'It is clear beyond doubt, from reading the emails, that criminal activity had taken place at the News of the World,' the source said.

'The legal letter to News International was not just deeply misleading. After reading their contents, they should have called in the police'.


More...

Gordon Brown calls in police as row deepens with Murdoch papers
Mandelson, a 'giddy' Steve Hilton and, of course, Robert Peston... How Elizabeth Murdoch and Matthew Freud hosted the decadent last hurrah of the Chipping Norton set
Mysterious L-plates for the red Capri... how his first wife rumbled the philandering Andy Hayman
MP who will grill Brooks and the Murdochs admits he has links to News Corp

The source added: 'The emails include strong suggestions of illegal payments to Royal Protection officers. You would have thought this might have been of interest to their clients at the Palace'.

The Mail on Sunday understands that the stash of emails, held in the Harbottle & Lewis office, were unearthed by accident by Will Lewis, group general manager of News International, earlier this year.

Former NotW royal editor Clive Goodman: News International hired the firm after he sued for unfair dismissal

Former NotW royal editor Clive Goodman: News International hired the firm after he sued for unfair dismissal

While trawling through the company's computer system for evidence of hacking, he came across an email which referred to 'the file' at the solicitors.

When he obtained the emails, he was shocked by their contents and passed the file to another firm of solicitors, Hickman Rose.

They asked Lord Macdonald of River Glaven, the former head of the Crown Prosecution Service, to provide a report on the emails' contents for the board of News Corporation, News International's parent company, last month.

Lord Macdonald wrote that he had found evidence of indirect hacking, breaches of national security and serious crime.

He advised them to call in the police, which they then did – helping to spark the current furore.

Labour MP Tom Watson
, who has spearheaded Parliamentary calls for the full truth about the phone-hacking scandal to be exposed, has reported Harbottle & Lewis to the Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA), the legal watchdog.

The police were first alerted to the hacking scandal after Prince William saw an item in Mr Goodman's column about his appointment with a knee surgeon which, he concluded, could only have come from intercepting one of his mobile phone messages.

The Prince was advised by Harbottle & Lewis that a criminal offence had been committed.

It is unclear why News International also chose to use Harbottle & Lewis to defend Mr Goodman's claim. Mr Goodman received a substantial payout from the newspaper group in July 2007.


The SRA's Code of Conduct says that solicitors must not act in a case if it risks a conflict of interest, which is said to arise if they 'owe, or your firm owes, separate duties to act in the best interests of two or more clients in relation to the same or related matters, and those duties conflict, or there is a significant risk that those duties may conflict'.

Senior figures: Rupert Murdoch leaves News International HQ in with News International Group general manager Will Lewis

Senior figures: Rupert Murdoch leaves News International HQ in with News International Group general manager Will Lewis

Harbottle & Lewis were first hired by the Prince of Wales eight years ago, at a time they were best known for their showbusiness work. Their remit has included warning newspapers to protect the privacy of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge during their courtship and marriage.

Last night, a senior source at the Palace suggested that it was 'for Harbottle & Lewis' to answer claims of a conflict of interest, but added: 'The company's advice to us on hacking ended at the point when Clive Goodman was imprisoned.

'It was then that they gave advice to News International over his employment issue. They continued to work for us in other areas, but “Chinese walls” exist in these firms between employment lawyers, for example, and those working in other disciplines.'

A spokeswoman for Lawrence Abramson, who was managing partner at the firm in 2007, said: 'Professional duty of confidentiality prevents me from commenting.'

Both Buckingham Palace and News International last night declined to comment. Harbottle & Lewis did not respond to calls.


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#15 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 19 July 2011 - 11:25 PM

The Legakweek-Home

http://www.legalweek...-newscorp-clean



Harbottle defends Hackgate position; Grabiner to lead News Corp clean-up


Author: Simon Petersen

18 Jul 2011 | 15:05

Tags:
Technology / media / telecoms,
Hackgate

right

Harbottle & Lewis has issued a letter in response to allegations in the press that the firm made a mistake in its part in an internal investigation into phone-hacking at News International.

In an open letter sent earlier today (18 July), Harbottle said that its ability to respond to the allegations made last week by News Corporation head Rupert Murdoch were constrained by factors including client confidentiality.

Harbottle's letter states: "Despite the constraints upon us, we can make it clear that many recent press reports have not accurately described the extent of our retainer from News International in 2007. Unfortunately we are not at present able to correct these errors by explaining what the scope of that retainer was, since that is (or at least may be, depending on technical legal arguments) privileged information.

"All of these issues will no doubt become clearer in due course, especially when all of the relevant parties co-operate fully with the various investigations and inquiries. In the mean time, we will say more as and when it becomes professionally possible to do so."

The law firm has also appointed PR consultancy Luther Pendragon to represent it in the matter.

In a separate development, News Corp has appointed Lord Grabiner QC (pictured) to chair a high-level standards committee charged with leading the company's response to the wider hacking claims.

The One Essex Court heavyweight - one of the top commercial silks in the UK - will chair the committee, which News Corp said in a statement is "authorised to co-operate fully with all relevant investigations and inquiries in the News of the World phone hacking case, police payments and all other related issues across News International, as well as conducting its own enquiries where appropriate."

Harbottle's statement comes after Murdoch alleged in an interview with The Wall Street Journal published last Friday (15 July) that Harbottle made "a major mistake" in its role reviewing a number of emails from staff at now-defunct Sunday tabloid the News of the World (NoW).

The investigation saw Harbottle's former managing partner, Lawrence Abramson, confirm to News International director of legal affairs, Jon Chapman, in 2007 that it had not found anything in the emails to suggest that phone hacking went further than former NoW royal editor Clive Goodman, who was jailed in 2007, or was known about by management such as Andy Coulson.

News International subsequently concluded as a result of its internal investigation that Goodman acted alone. Harbottle's advice was disclosed to a Parliamentary committee in 2009.

A spokesperson for Lawrence Abramson, who left Harbottle last year to join Fladgate, issued the following statement on his behalf: "My previous statement - 'Professional duty of confidentiality prevents me from commenting on this' - remains the case. I am not in a position to comment any further."

Since Murdoch openly criticised Harbottle, the firm has come in for additional criticism in the press, with reports this weekend suggesting that Labour MP Tom Watson has called on the Solicitors Regulation Authority to investigate Harbottle.

An SRA spokesperson said the body was unable to comment on individual investigations but added in a subsequent statement: "As with any high-profile case, we are monitoring the situation closely to determine what, if any, regulatory approaches we need to take. We do not generally disclose details of our inquiries at early stages, to avoid prejudicing any regulatory action."

However, Watson confirmed to Legal Week via Twitter that he had made the referral to the SRA.

Separately, Watson has also called on the Serious Fraud Office to investigate alleged payments made by News International to victims of the NoW's phone-hacking.


The SFO said in a statement: "The SFO can confirm that it has today received a letter from Tom Watson MP calling upon the SFO to investigate certain allegations relating to News Corp. SFO director Richard Alderman will give full consideration to Mr Watson's letter. The SFO is aware that the Metropolitan Police Service is conducting an investigation into alleged improper payments to police officers."

The SFO also confirmed that it had been talking with US authorities and was ready to assist them if they chose to open an investigation into News Corp in the US.

Click here for all the latest legal news on the Hackgate saga
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#16 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 24 July 2011 - 11:44 PM

View Posthukildaspida, on 19 July 2011 - 09:57 PM, said:

Staggering to think that the Police are not up to the minute on training staff how to detect how easy & cunning phone/electronic hacking is done by these damn crooks and others like them.

One doesn't need to be "rocket scientist" to know it has gone on for years by Private Investigators and other lowlife scum.

It ranks as low as going through people's private rubbish, and following and watching people trying to go about their daily lives.

We all know http://www.acc.co.nz and it's contracted Private Investigator agents have destroyed people's wellbeing and careers with their lowlife obsessions to innocent people's lives.




Lowlife scum is the understatement.

This article from 1995 and the article in the next post from 1993 are worth a read to see how low some sink to in life to get information about people for pecunairy gain.


http://www.nickdavie...e-scoop-monger/

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The scoop monger


The Guardian
Published October 1995 No comments... »

When politicians in different corners of the world wonder out loud whether Rupert Murdoch is becoming too powerful, they are thinking normally on a grand scale, about his potential to manipulate governments or to subvert national cultures. However, the same question can arise on a much more human scale, if any ordinary individuals find themselves challenging Rupert’s rule.

Consider the case of Michelle and Lisa Taylor, two teenaged sisters from south London who were briefly the object of a tabloid feeding frenzy in the summer of 1992, when they were convicted of murdering a 21-year-old bank clerk named Alison Shaughnessy, whose husband had once been Michelle Taylor’s boyfriend. It had precisely the combination of body fluids which Rupert’s men so love – blood, tears and semen. They lapped it up.

The quality press never did trust their conviction. The Guardian, the Independent, the Observer and BBC Newsnight all investigated the case and concluded that there was good reason to believe the two sisters were innocent. In June 1993, the Court of Appeal agreed and released the two young women with two stinging rebukes: one for the detectives who had failed to disclose vital evidence; the other for the tabloids who had prejudiced their trial with “unremitting, sensational, inaccurate and misleading” stories. Lord Justice McCowan asked the Attorney General to consider bringing contempt proceedings against the tabloids, including those belonging to Mr Murdoch. Ten months later, the Conservative Attorney General quietly decided to do no such thing.

And there matters might have rested. Michelle and Lisa Taylor might have emerged from prison – terrified, confused, bitterly angry but nonetheless ready to rebuild their lives – if it had it not been for two apparently unrelated events which have now conspired together to teach the two sisters a lesson about what can happen if you stand up and risk Rupert’s revenge.

The first of these events was very simple. When they discovered that the Attorney General had let the tabloids off the hook, the Taylors announced that they were going to the High Court for a judicial review. Geoffrey Robertson QC agreed to act for them in a case which would see half a dozen Fleet Street editors in the dock if it succeeded. In other words, they stood up and defied Rupert Murdoch and the tabloids. It was a decision which was braver than they realised.

The second event has a stranger history and it involves a very strange character, whose name is Bernard O’Mahoney. Alternatively, his name is also Patrick Mahoney or Patrick Lawson or Bernard King, depending on the circumstances. Mr O’Mahoney is a nightclub bouncer from Basildon in Essex, a burley figure with a crew cut and a criminal record for violence, and he has come to specialise in a new form of roguery which is itself a testament to the power of Murdoch’s press. He is a scoop monger. That is to say, he befriends people who are in the news – particularly high-profile prisoners – extracts their secrets, usually in the form of letters, and then sells their contents to the tabloids. He is not the only opportunist to spot the niche in the market created by Fleet Street’s decline into chequebook journalism. There are half a dozen scoop mongers at work, but he is the best. Friendship is his business.

It was Mr O’Mahoney who posed as the lovely “Belinda Cannon” in 1991 and sent a torrent of letters, sealed with “big juicy hugs”, to the Yorkshire Ripper, Peter Sutcliffe, who replied in kind from his secure ward in Broadmoor Hospital. Mr O’Mahoney repaid his trust by giving his bundle of correspondance to a woman friend and sending her in to the Sunday People with a wig and a request for £4,000 in cash. Unfortunately for Mr O’Mahoney, the woman dropped her guard, took off her wig and admitted all to the People’s reporter. Peter Sutcliffe stopped writing.

It was Mr O’Mahoney who befriended Richard Blenkey while he was awaiting trial for the murder of a seven-year-old boy in 1992. In one of his letters, Blenkey effectively confessed to the crime. Before you could say “chequebook”, the letter was with the News of the World, and Mr Blenkey was pleading guilty in court. He, too, ended the correspondance. At the time, police in Basildon were quoted in the national press explaining that Mr O’Mahoney had been writing to prisoners in order to sell their stories since 1989 when he had opened a line to Ronnie Kray. But the exposure did nothing to stop him. And by that time, he already had his hands on a new and juicy tale. Only this time, he went a little further than usual.

O’Mahoney had spotted the Taylor sisters. Within days of their trial opening at the Old Bailey, on July 6 1992, Michelle Taylor received her first letter from “Bernie” – full of sympathy, full of certainty that they could never have committed this crime, full of friendship. Michelle replied. Bernie kept writing and sent a photograph. Michelle replied again and recognised his face in the public gallery at the Old Bailey.

Then, as the trial finished and the two girls were convicted and jailed for life, an odd thing happened. The News of the World published a scoop by their crime reporter, Gary Jones. “Alison’s killer hated being love rat’s ‘tart’” was the headline. It quoted from “a letter to a pal” , in which Michelle described how she had come to hate her former boyfriend. Michelle Taylor was distraught. She told O’Mahoney he was a rat. He swore he was innocent.

He wrote and admitted that the News of the World’s letter “said a lot of similar thing that you wrote to me” but he claimed to have called the paper on the day the story was published (even though their office was closed) and to have discovered that there was a press agency hawking a whole collection of Michelle’s letters. They couldn’t be the letters she had written to him, he said. He still had them, he said. “I am above such mercenary behaviour,” he explained. Two days later, he wrote again and admitted that it was his letter in the News of the World, but he insisted that it must have been copied by someone else without his knowledge. He signed off with “love and deepest affection”.

Michelle was confused. She felt betrayed but she also felt guilty about blaming him when she wasn’t really sure of the truth – after all, she and Lisa were being wrongly blamed in just the same way. She knew she had written a similar letter to another friend, she had no idea of O’Mahoney’s activities as a scoop monger, she liked his attention, she was glad he was so sure of their innocence and since he volunteered to sign an undertaking that he would never betray their confidence and since he also wrote in capital letters “I WOULD NEVER HARM YOU, MICHELLE”, she gave him the benefit of her doubt. He signed the undertaking not to betray their confidence, and she carried on writing.

Soon, Mr O’Mahoney was a close friend, a regular visitor to the sisters’ prison and to the home of their parents, Ann and Derek, who were running a campaign to prove that their daughters were innocent. Mr O’Mahoney busied himself on their behalf, tracking down witnesses and checking new leads. That autumn, he started talking about writing a book. He said he wouldn’t talk about money. They could sort that out later. The important thing now was to get them out of prison. Michelle agreed and told him that she and Lisa didn’t want any money at all from the book. They just wanted people to know they were innocent and how corrupt the legal system was.

On June 11 1993, the Taylor sisters were released by the Court of Appeal, and another odd thing happened. The News of the World published another scoop, written again by their crime reporter, Gary Jones. The puzzling thing about this particular story was that it managed to describe the celebrations inside the Taylors’ home, including the fact that Lisa Taylor was with the son of a woman they had met in prison. But Gary Jones had never been inside their home. He had turned up on their doorstep and slipped a signed note through the letter box, offering them “a substantial sum of money for your exclusive story”. “I am outside your door at the moment,” he had added. They had left him there. So how had he known what was happening inside? No-one suspected the burley bouncer who was sitting alongside Michelle. They guessed Gary Jones had just made it up, just like he had made up the sentence in the story in which he said the News of the World had refused to offer them money for their story. They knew that was a lie, and they kept his note to prove it.

At this stage, the Taylor sisters were still the victims of nothing more than the traditional treatment handed out by Murdoch’s boys. The heavy shelling started later. By that time, Michelle had fallen in love with the man who seemed so keen to champion her cause, and then fallen out again when she discovered that he was still involved with his former girlfriend. She threw him out. There was a flurry of anxiety when Michelle believed that he had taken some of her legal papers with him; a brief tug of war about who owned the book they had started writing; and then a dark year of bitter recrimination during which O’Mahoney made threatening phone calls and delivered sneering notes, while Lisa Taylor’s husband made threatening calls in reply, someone slashed the tyres on the Taylors’ cars, and both sides complained to the police.

In this new mood of mutual hatred, O’Mahoney gave a long interview to officers who were investigating the case on behalf of the Police Complaints Authority. He told them he had had enough of telling lies for the Taylor sisters. The truth, he claimed, was that he had manufactured false evidence to help the sisters win their appeal. Since he was claiming to have distorted evidence which had played no part in the Court of Appeal’s decision, his allegation missed its target. But he carried on firing.

On May 28 of this year, there was another story in the News of the World, written again by Gary Jones, describing the girls as “twisted sisters”, claiming that Michelle had seduced O’Mahoney away from his girlfriend, drawing a parallel with the “love triangle” which was supposed to have led to the murder of Alison Shaughnessy – and quoting explicitly from Michelle’s letters to O’Mahoney. The Taylor sisters were distraught, particularly at the discreet nudge suggesting that there probably was something in the case against them after all. But at least they finally knew the truth about who was betraying them.

They still had the undertaking which O’Mahoney had signed, promising not to betray their confidence. Fearing still more stories based on the scoop monger’s material, their lawyer, Mark Stephens, wrote to the News of the World, threatening an injunction unless they undertook to stop publishing confidential information. The News of the World refused. So the Taylors went to court. That was when the scoop monger produced his big story. He swore an affidavit in which he claimed that Michelle Taylor had broken down and confessed to him that, in truth, she was guilty of the murder of Alison Shaughnessy.

In the affidavit, O’Mahoney claimed that in October 1993, shortly before breaking up with Michelle, he had found a letter from the Taylors’ original solicitor, Michael Holmes, in which Holmes supposedly recorded that Michelle had admitted her role in the murder. O’Mahoney went on to claim that he had confronted Michelle with this damning letter and that she had given a tearful but nonetheless detailed account of how she had murdered Alison Shaughnessy. It was this, he said, which had led to the break-up of their relationship. “I felt I had been completely conned,” he added, with no sign of irony.

At one level, the Taylors had no trouble dealing with the claim. The idea that their original solicitor had written this letter was denied by the solicitor, who swore an emphatic affidavit describing O’Mahoney’s account as “spiteful, damaging and untrue”. O’ Mahoney replied by suggesting that it must have been someone else in the solicitor’s office who had written the letter. The claim was contradicted, too, by the Court of Appeal’s decision and also by common sense. If Michelle Taylor truly had confessed to the scoop monger 19 months ago, why had he never put a reporter on to finding this lawyer’s letter? And, more than that, why had he never mentioned it to the officers from the Police Complaints Authority, with whom he had done his best to damage the sisters’ standing on the basis that he was fed up with telling lies for them? He explained in his affidavit that he had said nothing because he couldn’t see the point and, anyway, he didn’t want to upset the Shaughnessy family.

In one sense, O’Mahoney was firing a blank shell. This was a libel so severe that he would never be able to sell it to any newspaper, no matter who owned it. However, there was one way in which newspapers would be able to print the confession – if it came out in the course of a court hearing. That way, the press could report the affidavit under the cloak of court privilege. And by this time, the Taylors had declared war on the tabloids with their action against the Attorney General. It was due to be heard within weeks. Now the tabloids returned the fire. The News of the World and their scoop monger decided to go to court.

The Taylor sisters were trapped. If they backed out of their law suit, O’Mahoney would be free to sell all their letters and anything else he had picked up about “the twisted sisters”. He could manufacture as many stories as he liked, knowing that the sisters would never sue him for fear of him bringing his affidavit to court. But if they pressed ahead with their law suit, the News of the World’s lawyers – who also happened to be O’Mahoney’s lawyers – would claim that the sisters were trying to gag them only in order to conceal this evidence of their guilt. They would present the affidavit in court, the tabloids would line up to report every word and the two sisters would be tried all over again. They would win in court. They had no doubt about it. But by that time, the smear would have been spread across the country by their tabloid opponents.

Hukildaspida says: Interesting that at the time this happened that News of the World's lawyers also happened to be O'Mahoney's lawyers - The same thing appears to have happened when Harbottle & Lewis who have been the Royal's lawyers for a considerable time then were News International (part of News of the World) Lawyers for a brief period when a certain Private Investigator, Mulcaire & Royal Reporter Clive Goodman, were in a spot of bother...

What does that suggest?

Dishonesty has gone on in Rupert Murdoch's stable for a rather long time...so who are the rats that are still getting away with it & why haven't they been caught?

Lawyers need to be on the alert just what News International are up to, infiltrating there firms in a covert way perhaps to stop the truth been uncovered..

Sounds a bit similiar to some of the ongoings at http://www.acc.co.nz


The battle went into a temporary stand-off, with both sides agreeing not to discuss the case with anyone until it came to a full hearing. In the meantime, in July of this year, the Taylors lost their case against the Attorney General. Briefly, they contemplated surrender against the News of the World, trying to strike some kind of deal with them which might leave their reputation intact. But in the exchange of paperwork to prepare the legal case, they discovered that O’Mahoney had known Gary Jones for years and had been in the habit of speaking to him three or four times a week, all through the time that he was befriending them. They found, too, that he was hoping to publish a whole book full of letters from prisoners he had befriended. It made them feel like meat on a hook. It also made them too angry to surrender.

If the lesson they were supposed to learn was that they had better not tangle with the tabloids, they rejected it. They have asked their lawyers to go to the House of Lords to challenge once more the Attorney General’s failure to punish the press for prejudicing their case; today they plan to hold a press conference to denounce the attempt at trial by tabloid; and then they will wait to see whether they must suffer another round of Rupert’s revenge.

Categories: Miscarriage of justice, Problems with journalism.
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#17 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 24 July 2011 - 11:58 PM

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How Rupert Murdoch killed off blackmail

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When Basil Tozer – historian of crime and caddish behaviour -produced his study of Confidence Crooks and Blackmailers in 1929, he was in no doubt about the importance of his work. “This book,” he wrote, “will, if read carefully, enable even simpletons to avoid being duped by rogues.” To help the simpletons, he spelled out the suffering of the unwary in cautionary tales of terrible significance. Like this one…

“A man of high position, who was well known in London Society but who was in the habit of associating with people of disagreeable character, suddenly disappeared. Where he had gone or why he had gone, even his most intimate friends did not know. All that was known was that he had left instructions for his town house, furniture and other personal property to be sold without reserve.

“Recently, the man died. It then transpired that since his disappearance, he had been living alone in a cottage in the west of Ireland. And the reason was this. One night in London, he had been taken by some of his undesirable acquaintances to a house of ill-fame. There, certain photographs had been taken of him without his knowledge.

“With these photographs in their possession, the scoundrels had blackmailed him and continued to blackmail him, threatening that if he failed to pay they would send prints of the photographs to all his relatives and friends anonymously. Terrified, knowing that if that happened he would be hounded out of society for ever, disgraced, he had paid and paid until reduced to poverty.”

Basil Tozer had scores of stories like that, for he lived in dangerous times, when blackmail was part of the regular routine of London villains: the threatening letter written in hacked-out chunks of newspaper; the rich and respectable citizen ruined by one moment of sin; the occasional trial full of mouth-watering euphemisms. In Tozer’s day, blackmailers were so busy that the courts felt compelled to threaten them with penal servitude for life. Few blackmailers were ever caught. Yet now, they are as rare as a ruby. Genuine blackmail – extortion by the threat of embarrassment – is extinct as a profession and almost dead even as an act of opportunism.

The strange and lonely death of the English blackmailer is, at first sight, an occasion to rejoice. He was always a despicable figure with his suitcase full of other people’s secrets and his grasping, grubby hands and, occasionally, his almost lustful delight in rubbing the victim’s nose in their sin (“You have only yourself to blame, Lady X”). It is the nature of his death which first suggests that there is something here to mourn. The little villain, you see, was murdered.

It is true that he appears to belong to another era – of tin baths and gas light and the vengeful pinch of arsenic in the Irish stew – and he is buried now alongside the cat burglars and pick pockets and all the other villains whose skills have faded into history. But it was not old age that killed him. On closer inspection, you can see the marks of a frantic struggle in which the blackmailer was slowly suffocated and thrown aside by a bigger and more powerful villain who is still at large and still enjoying his victim’s goods. I refer, of course, to our national newspapers.

In a world where Fleet Street’s cheque book will buy the secrets of any rich man’s scandal, there is no room for the blackmailer. The most recent example is the male prostitute who claims to have been having sex in a raincoat with one of John Major’s advisors (male). Years ago, he would have terrorised the man with threats and allegations until he got what he wanted. Now, he simply hops into a taxi and turns up at the offices of the Sunday People to collect his reward.

Numerous scandals of the last decade have begun in this way: the Queen’s bodyguard, Michael Trestrail, driven from the palace when a rent boy went to the press; Lord Dervaird, forced to resign from the Scottish bench in similar circumstances; Frank Bough, betrayed twice in four years by prostitutes who flogged him and then flogged the story; the President of the Scottish Conservatives, sold to the Sun by a prostitute with bruises on her backside; David Mellor, ransomed to the Sunday People, complete with transcripts of telephone calls; Jeffrey Archer, deposed and then rehabilitated after a Mayfair hooker’s punter thought he had seen him in compromising circumstances and started an auction.

It is a kind of extortion-by-proxy and – from the betrayer’s point of view – it is full of advantages. Newspaper barons are far richer than most of the people whose lives they expose and so they can afford to pay far more for their secrets. More than that, it is legal. As long as they recycle their greed through a press baron’s bank account, the treacherous prostitute and the jilted lover have nothing to fear and thousands to gain. And this is where you may begin to miss the company of Basil Tozer’s professionals.

For a start, they took some risks and they also had some skill. They could hardly rely on good chance to supply them with enough embarrassing secrets to ensure a steady income. They had to procure their victims, and Tozer is eloquent on the dangers of bogus nursing homes with seductive nurses, of respectable strangers who invite you “to witness some nude dancing” and of phoney psycho-analysts (“Before the first sitting had ended, the patient had generally described events in her past life which, under normal circumstances, nothing would have induced her to speak about”).

More important, the professional blackmailer left his victims with a way out. He was offering to sell his silence – the victim had been tempted and had sinned and was being offered a kind of redemption – but Mr Murdoch and his gang make no such concession. If the price is right, they’ll ruin you and send you straight to hell.

As the rewards of this surrogate blackmail soar, the game is bound to change. Newspapers will soon take a leaf out of the old professionals’ book and start to procure their own scandals. Those with sins to hide will fight back – by demanding legislation to protect their private parts and by taking out new Exposure Reduction insurance policies so that if they are caught, they can hire vicious lawyers to stifle reports of their behaviour. Thus threatened, the press will cut its losses by agreeing to publish no more such filth; instead, they will become mere watchdogs of private morality, agreeing to pass such stories to their subjects, providing, of course, that the subject is willing to make a suitable donation.

Categories: Problems with journalism.
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#18 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 04 August 2011 - 12:47 AM

Click on this link for the following stories relating to the News of the World Phone/ Electronic Hacking.

http://www.guardian....P=ILCNETTXT6921


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Why Buscombe had to go - hacking did live up to its dramatic billing
29 Jul 2011, 13:56 BST:

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Uncomfortable truths about the editorial pressures on journalists
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Few seaworthy life rafts for the News of the World boat people
29 Jul 2011, 8:47 BST

The transcripts

Rebekah Brooks at the culture, media and sport select committee
Chief Executive of News International, Rebekah Brooks

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The Guardian's editor debated issues arising from the phone-hacking scandal with readers
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News of the World bugging led to £700,000 payout to PFA chief executive Gordon Taylor
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Nov 2009: PCC - no evidence it was misled
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April 2011: Disclosure of formerly secret number exposes Met to complaint it breached agreement to warn potential victims
Oct 2010: Police ask Guardian for evidence

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The former managing editor of the News Of The World, Stuart Kuttner
Kuttner is latest NoW exec to be arrested

Former managing editor and one-time public face of the News of the World taken into custody
Dan Sabbagh: A statement of intent from the Met
Mulcaire: I acted only on NoW's orders
Mulcaire's solicitors say NI still liable for legal fees
NoW targeted phone of Sarah Payne's mother
NI mass-deleted emails, tech firm says
News International

HCL reveals News International's various requests for deletion but tells MPs it knew of nothing untoward
Yard sets up computer hacking taskforce
Leveson inquiry 'may need more than a year'
No 10 refuses to disclose Coulson's access
9/11 families to meet US attorney general
Mirror drawn into spotlight by Morgan
Piers Morgan denies link to phone hacking

Publisher haunted by allegations against the former Daily Mirror editor
Mensch apologises to Morgan
Morgan denies phone-hacking claims
Murdoch likely to be recalled to face MPs
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Commons committee 'very likely' to recall BSkyB chairman following phone-hacking statement from News International's former director of legal affairs and two other ex-executives
BSkyB reports £1bn pre-tax profits
Murdoch back to chair BSkyB meeting
Murdochs in line for massive bonuses

What they said now and ... then

Boris Johnson
18 July 2011: Says Sir Paul Stephenson has made 'right decision'
15 September 2010: Dismisses News of the World hacking as 'codswollop'
18 July 2011: Says John Yates's resignation is 'regrettable but right'
13 July 2011: Gives his backing to John Yates

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James Murdoch likely to remain BSkyB head after winning key backer
James Murdoch

Sky deputy chairman Nicholas Ferguson understood to have given his backing after 'long conversation' in private meeting. By Jane Martinson

News International

News International ordered mass deletion of emails nine times
News International, Wapping Lawyers for firm contracted to NI said it deleted emails on nine occasions since May 2010: there was 'nothing abnormal'

Politics

Tom Watson: 'Phone hacking is only the start. There's a lot more to come out'
Tom Watson The Labour MP has won the admiration of fellow politicians for doggedly investigating the phone-hacking scandal. What has the experience taught him, how has it changed his life – and what revelations are still to come?

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Protester jailed for throwing foam pie at Rupert Murdoch
Jonathan May-Bowles given six week sentence for assaulting media mogul as he was giving evidence about phone hacking
Stuart Kuttner: the News of the World's notoriously frugal managing editor
Stuart Kuttner was paper's managing editor for 22 years, serving with editors including Rebekah Brooks and Andy Coulson. By James Robinson and Lisa O'Carroll
Phone-hacking scandal: key figure at News International arrested
Unnamed man, believed to be former NoW managing editor Stuart Kuttner, taken into custody for questioning
Glenn Mulcaire 'acted under instructions' over voicemails

Private investigator denies acting on his own as Sara Payne admits phone hacking link left her 'very distressed and upset'
David Cameron faces growing pressure over Andy Coulson hiring
Labour leadership demands answers about Andy Coulson's access to national security documents inside No 10
Piers Morgan wins apologies from Channel 4 News and Louise Mensch
Jon Snow and Conservative MP apologise for false claims about the former News of the World and Mirror editor
MP Louise Mensch apologises to Piers Morgan over phone hacking comments
Conservative MP and author Louise Mensch writes to culture select committe saying she misread newspaper article
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#19 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 09 August 2011 - 03:47 PM

Phone hacking: police who took tip-off fees to be investigated by taxman

http://www.guardian....nvestigated-tax

HMRC crackdown means officers who accepted payments from newspapers or private investigators face prosecution and fines

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Patrick Collinson
guardian.co.uk, Friday 5 August 2011 18.54 BST
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paul stephenson
Sir Paul Stephenson said it was likely that senior officers had accepted payments from newspapers. These payments are to be investigated by HMRC. Photograph: Rex

Police officers who allegedly took payments from newspapers and private investigators could face hefty fines and criminal prosecution after it emerged HM Revenue & Customs is reopening personal tax records to check if payments were fully disclosed.

It is understood HMRC has already begun probing self-assessment forms from previous years in the wake of new information obtained amid the phone-hacking revelations.

Last month Sir Paul Stephenson, the outgoing Metropolitan police commissioner, said documents provided by News International appear to include information on "inappropriate payments" to police officers. It was reported that the company provided the Met with details of payments made by the News of the World to senior officers between 2003 and 2007.

Under HMRC rules any payments earned in connection with an individual's employment are required to be disclosed for tax purposes, even if the payment is deemed illegal.

An HMRC spokesperson said he could not confirm the nature or extent of any investigation into a private individual's tax affairs. But he confirmed that HMRC will act on any new information and that illegal earnings can still be liable for tax.

Action to recover tax from police officers paid illegal tip-off fees relies on the precedent set by the "Miss Whiplash" prostitution case of the early 1990s, which has since entered the HMRC rule book. Miss Whiplash, who also went by the name of Lindi St Clair, was pursued for £112,000 in unpaid income tax in the late 1980s. It culminated in a court case in 1990 where she argued that since it was illegal to live on immoral earnings, taxing her would be committing an offence. But she lost the case and was subsequently made bankrupt.

An HMRC spokesman said: "If you receive money in connection with your employment then it is liable for income tax. Illegality is irrelevant."

Over the past year HMRC has intensified investigations into alleged tax cheats and promised to increase the number of prosecutions. Since April HMRC has had powers to name and shame anyone found to have deliberately evaded £25,000 or more in tax. The scheme will see names, addresses and details of the evasion made public. But those who come clean can avoid having their details published.

Earlier this year the government gave HMRC with an additional £900m to fund more investigations into tax evasion. The aim is to raise an additional £7bn in tax each year by 2014/15. HMRC has also gained new powers to inspect taxpayers' records and documents. In a typical investigation it will examine income and earnings dating back six years. If it discovers an individual has knowingly submitted an inaccurate return or document, or taken active steps to conceal earnings, it can demand repayment of the tax, plus interest and a penalty of up to 100% of the unpaid tax.

The department recently announced the targeting of the restaurant industry with a new task force dedicated to detecting tax and national insurance evasion. But it added that criminal prosecutions were reserved only for the most serious cases of high level fraud.

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Hmmm photo by Rex, is that one and the same Rex Features who have been in trouble over the years for unlawfully stalking various people, taking their photo's as they go about their lawful private life and whom Rex Features had to make an apology for having done so?
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#20 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 09 August 2011 - 04:12 PM

With the revelations that Private Investigators/ Private Detectives have been implicated in Phone Hacking in the UK, who is to say it hasn't been done in New Zealand, or who it may have been done to.


Should we be calling for a revamp and overhaul of the recently changed Private Security Personnel and Private Investigators Regulations?

http://www.legislati...px?id=DLM414295

Should Private Investigators have been given the power to photograph and/ or video people for instance?

Should we be asking for a thorough investigation into the Character Referees used to obtain Immigration, Police Employment and Private Investigator status into New Zealand??

Who is to say we haven't unwittingly allowed some of these corrupt people, including police who have carried out dodgey behaviour in the UK into New Zealand and are or have worked for http://www.police.govt.nz or are now contracted to http://www.acc.co.nz?

Have full and proper checks been done on ex UK Police Officers who immigrated to New Zealand as Police Officers and only stayed with them for a short time prior to becoming Private Investigators and setting up their own companies etc in New Zealand?

The Phone Hacking Investigation must extend to New Zealand at some stage as we readily accept UK citizens, some of whom, for all we know, may be implicated without us been aware of their true backgrounds.


Private Security Personnel and Private
Investigators Regulations 2011 2011/44



http://accforum.org/...gulations-2011/
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