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Assessor in Timaru - unmasked

#1 User is offline   Joanne 

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Posted 15 February 2011 - 08:17 PM

The medical advisor in Timaru is the orthopaedic surgeon Mr Bill Taine. We got this info from a family members file - he had commented on her. He specializes in giving opinions on persons completely unknown to him. He relies on information supplied by ACC and as we all a lot of it is misinformation or fabricated. So those out there that live in Timaru beware of this man - find out what information he is giving about you.
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#2 User is offline   MINI 

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Posted 16 February 2011 - 10:28 AM

View PostJoanne, on 15 February 2011 - 08:17 PM, said:

The medical advisor in Timaru is the orthopaedic surgeon Mr Bill Taine. We got this info from a family members file - he had commented on her. He specializes in giving opinions on persons completely unknown to him. He relies on information supplied by ACC and as we all a lot of it is misinformation or fabricated. So those out there that live in Timaru beware of this man - find out what information he is giving about you.

Hi there

You are not wrong about the misinformation. I just pulled all ACC's misinformation to bits in Review late last year. Took 3/4 hour just for that alone, then there was the actual issue to get around too.

It is no wonder DRSL win so many of their cases. They are fed so much shit and if you dont watch it, the stuff goes all the way to Court.

Oh well I think I am near the end, so maybe can get some life soon.

Mini

Admin

This person quote was sticking out the side of the main topic area. It was posted last night, yet has disappeared from the main topic screen. If I had not looked for it, I would not have even got to read it.

A good way to stop information getting through. It would be important if I lived down there or even if local ACC office was using his services to do orthopaedic assessments on us that have those injuries without our knowledge.

I consider you must come up with a plan that allows all posts to be read, all in the forum topics lounge posts for at least a couple of days without interferring with them.

Mini
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#3 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 16 October 2014 - 01:45 PM

ACC job takes medical officer off-call - at last
ALEXIA JOHNSTON
Last updated 05:00 17/10/2012

http://www.stuff.co....ff-call-at-last

Bill Taine is putting away his scalpel, along with his role of chief medical officer for the South Canterbury District Health Board.

His part-time role with ACC is to become fulltime.


His career with Timaru Hospital spans 26 years, long enough to see the development of four different identities for the organisation now known as the South Canterbury District Health Board.

Dr Taine
started work at the hospital as an orthopaedic surgeon on December 29, 1986. He later moved into a mixed public and private practice, where he remained until 2007.

From then he started dividing his time between the hospital as an orthopaedic surgeon and ACC, where he has been working part- time as a medical adviser. In 2010 he became SCDHB's chief medical officer.

The next major shift in his career will come in November when his role at ACC goes fulltime, which will mean giving up his other medical roles.

In the past 26 years he has seen many changes to the industry, particularly in improvements to equipment and processes.

The structure of the hospital and the clinical practices were among the aspects that had changed "a great deal", he said.

"When I started there were three people in charge of the hospital - a medical superintendent, chief nurse and hospital administrator."

He said it was a "reflection of how simple things were" in those days.

"Now there's more accountability across the board, a lot more transparency, I think, and a lot more economic management or oversight."

He said the introduction of the SCDHB in 2000 had provided a more professional approach.

Dr Taine said his earliest years at Timaru Hospital were also spent with limited technology. "When I first started here we didn't have a CT scanner."

He joined a committee to get one in the late 1980s. "It was a bloody awful machine, but we thought it was great."

Its arrival eliminated a "bunch of invasive investigations", he said.

Although some aspects of the industry have changed over the years, some things have remained the same. "When you are beavering away you've still got people in front of you with broken bones and fractures."

Dr Taine said he would miss his colleagues and his patients. The one thing he will not miss is being on call, an aspect which has dominated 32 years of his life.
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