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NZ Slated on Domestic Violence Leitner Centre for International Law & Justice Report

#1 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 14 April 2009 - 05:16 PM

http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/2330221/NZ...mestic-violence

The Leitner report was released in NZ Parliament today, 14 April 2009.

http://www.leitnerla...s/doc-17866.pdf

See also http://www.roundtablevaw.org.nz
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#2 User is offline   doppelganger 

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Posted 14 April 2009 - 06:57 PM

as the article pointed were the problem is "

Quote

"Last week Contesse pointed the finger at the New Zealand government, telling the Star-Times: "Under international law the government must do all it can to prevent domestic violence and punish such acts and if they don't do everything possible to prevent such violence occurring they are in effect responsible."


It is not just the present Goverment but the past goverment also. It must be remembered that all that the Goverment has done is to advertise that domestic violence is about everywere.
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#3 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 23 April 2009 - 12:51 PM

View Posthukildaspida, on Apr 14 2009, 05:16 PM, said:



Pages 37 to 40 in this report are of importance to us all.

The government should carry out adequate training on emotional abuse for Police, Judges, Lawyers & Government workers to ensure emotional abuse is treated as seriously as physical abuse when it comes to granting & enforcing orders of Protection.

Where is ACC mentioned in this Report?
Are they not the agency that is to provide support & counselling to Abused people?
We would hope it is an oversight they weren't mentioned as they have a key role for helping those harmed by such unlawful conduct.


The same recommendations in this Leitner Report on Domestic Violence need to apply for those involved where protection is granted under the objectives of the complex Harassment Act.

Maybe His Honour, the semi-retired, Judge Robert Kerr can help with this.
He is familiar with the harm emotional abuse & physical attacks did to a couple of close personal friends who were both eligible for protection within the objectives of the complex Harassment Act.
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#4 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 02 October 2009 - 06:54 PM

NZ will be slated further thanks to ACC changes to the way they (don't) treat Sexual Abuse Clients.

So much for the "It's not OK" campaign & all the good work the Police do to stop Violence.

Good on you ACC. NOT.

Some people in postions of power associated with ACC should take a good hard look at themselves.

Maybe they are too scared to because they are Abusers themselves hiding behind a wall they are afraid will come crumbling down on their own lives.

They say the worst offenders are those in Positions of Power.
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#5 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 05 October 2009 - 03:48 PM

Conviction rate in sex abuse cases 13%

Responding to Sexual Violence: Environmental Scan of NZ Report

http://www.mwa.govt.nz/news-and-pubs/publi...ironmental-scan

Link is fixed to read this report
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#6 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 09 October 2009 - 03:50 PM

"Why doesnt he stop hurting her?"

This article is worth reading in the Listener 3 October 2009.

Online 17 October 2009.

Unfortunately the woman who made comments, in the last paragraphs, about her former partner moving onto someone else who was naive to have him & his children so he would forget about her was senseless.

It just shifts the ongoing cycle of Violence onto another innocent person & the cycle of Abuse & Violence continues on & on.

Maybe it's time there was a Nationwide Registrar of People who have Protection Orders against them so those who are vulnerable can be reassured they will not be subjected to the same unsolicicted behaviour of Violence.

It will also ensure the Police take complaints, & do something constructive about it, by vulnerable people who are NOT in Close Personal Relationships with these people & are subjected to the same pattern of Violence by other peoples Ex Partners who have Protection Orders against them & or have histories of Domestic Violence patterns of Behaviour that needs Corrective Treatment.

These Victims/Complainants whilst covered by the provisions & objectives of the Harassment Act 1997 etc, find it equally as challenging & distressing trying to come to terms with exactly the same unlawful behaviour in a different environment.

Incidently there are far less Support systems in place for people whom are covered under the Provisions of the Intricate Harassment Act, when there should be Equality for all whom are subjected to Violence & entitled to protection under this Law.

It is overdue there are better procedures in place to protect all victims of Violence, which incidently usually proceeds with subtle Psychological Tactics.

http://www.listener....op-hurting-her/

Harassment Law & ACC thread

http://www.accforum.org/forums/index.php?s...ic=5770&hl=
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#7 User is offline   ditch 

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Posted 09 October 2009 - 09:03 PM

.
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#8 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 23 October 2009 - 05:34 PM

Good to hear instant Protection Orders are able to be issued now, but how about instant Restraining Orders for those eligible for them under the provisions & objectives of the Harassment Act 1997 & thereafter?
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#9 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 12 August 2010 - 01:15 PM

View Posthukildaspida, on 09 October 2009 - 03:50 PM, said:

"Why doesnt he stop hurting her?"

This article is worth reading in the Listener 3 October 2009.

Online 17 October 2009.

Unfortunately the woman who made comments, in the last paragraphs, about her former partner moving onto someone else who was naive to have him & his children so he would forget about her was senseless.

It just shifts the ongoing cycle of Violence onto another innocent person & the cycle of Abuse & Violence continues on & on.

Maybe it's time there was a Nationwide Registrar of People who have Protection Orders against them so those who are vulnerable can be reassured they will not be subjected to the same unsolicicted behaviour of Violence.

It will also ensure the Police take complaints, & do something constructive about it, by vulnerable people who are NOT in Close Personal Relationships with these people & are subjected to the same pattern of Violence by other peoples Ex Partners who have Protection Orders against them & or have histories of Domestic Violence patterns of Behaviour that needs Corrective Treatment.

These Victims/Complainants whilst covered by the provisions & objectives of the Harassment Act 1997 etc, find it equally as challenging & distressing trying to come to terms with exactly the same unlawful behaviour in a different environment.

Incidently there are far less Support systems in place for people whom are covered under the Provisions of the Intricate Harassment Act, when there should be Equality for all whom are subjected to Violence & entitled to protection under this Law.

It is overdue there are better procedures in place to protect all victims of Violence, which incidently usually proceeds with subtle Psychological Tactics.

http://www.listener....op-hurting-her/

Harassment Law & ACC thread

http://www.accforum.org/forums/index.php?s...ic=5770&hl=



Police Safety Orders

How to deal with Family Violence
http://www.police.go...icviolence.html

National Network of Stopping Violence
http://www.nnsvs.org.nz/

Wonderful they are issuing Instant Police Safety Orders for victims of Domestic Violence.

Now how about Instant Police Safety Orders also being available for those who may be eligible, for the equivalent under the Harassment Act, whom are also subjected to the same abuse/violence when these offenders go flatting or end up in Boarding Houses etc, where others who live there may not know about these offenders backgrounds etc?

Anyone whom is living in an environment where these offenders often end up living should also under Law be entitled to the same protections.

Why wasn't provision of Instant Police Safety Orders made & included under the provisions of the Harassment Act at the same time as that of those covered under the Domestic Violence Act?

What is going to be done about it & how much longer do we have to wait for equal protection from these ******?
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#10 User is offline   Fighter for Justice 

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Posted 12 August 2010 - 02:47 PM

For once I disagree with you Hukildaspika! I do not believe Instant Police Safety Orders will do very much to stop violence. I am not a victim of domestic violence. However, any couple/family having any problems will be less likely to call Police for assistance - now that the Police have Instant Police Safety Orders And Memorandums of Understanding with CYFS!

More and more regulation will unfortunately not stamp out domestic violence or even child abuse - it may just drive people underground!

I do agree that people subject to harassment should have fast, workable options open to them to stop the harassment!

Fighter for Justice
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#11 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 23 December 2010 - 12:11 PM

ACC & Police putting up posters about Domestic Violence.

http://www.nzherald....jectid=10696146

Please, please please be aware and do something to help those whom are harmed by those covered by the complex provisions and objectives of the Harassment Act.

There are vulnerable people in the wider community whom are subjected to the same insidious and unlawful behaviour these rotten eggs inflict on those whom they are in family relationships with.

The damage is equally as hurtful, the fears for one's safety is equally as important.

Please, please http://www.police.govt.nz/ educate your staff and others just how frightening this behaviour is to those in the wider community.

You will find the same pattern of destructive behaviour is insidiously carried out by the same perpertrators who fail to comprehend the harm they continue to get away with.

Start by educating your staff to look up in your databases people whom complaints are made about them to see if they have Protection Orders against them and STOP the abuse in the wider community.
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#12 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 14 March 2011 - 03:45 PM

http://www.courierma...4-1225961158531


* From: The Courier-Mail
* November 25, 2010 11:00PM


VICTIMS of domestic violence are to get 20 days paid leave under a new plan from one of the nation's biggest building societies, in a potential first for Australian businesses.

The leave policy was yesterday unveiled by Toowoomba-based Heritage Building Society, which employs almost 700 staff, in conjunction with White Ribbon Day, which is marked to eradicate domestic violence.

The policy faces hurdles in the practicality of getting some victims being willing to access the leave. But it dovetails with other domestic-violence information programs within Heritage and the building society argues this awareness could prompt use of the policy.

Queensland Centre for Domestic and Family Violence Research director Heather Nancarrow described the initiative as "a fantastic development".

"Economic security for victims of domestic violence is critical," Ms Nancarrow said.

While universities in NSW and Victorian regional councils are known to be pushing for such leave, customer-owned Heritage is possibly the first private business to undertake such a plan.

"I hope that no one will ever use it," Heritage chief executive John Minz (pictured) said. "Our ultimate aim is to get to the time when this type of leave is no longer required."

He said the "domestic support leave policy" was brought in as part of Heritage's ongoing work with tackling domestic violence. Experts had advised staff and brochures had been produced.

Mr Minz, who this week won an award for a campaign against domestic violence, said he became aware of the policy after hearing of lobbying from groups at a political level.

and

http://www.dailytele...0-1226016380221

* HELEN POW
* From: The Sunday Telegraph
* March 06, 2011 12:00AM

BUSINESSES are being urged to give workers time off to sort out domestic violence problems at home.

Already some public servants are entitled to up to five days leave a year if they are suffering abuse at home - and by the end of the year these are expected to be joined by teachers, nurses, police officers and many council staff.

Now, with the 100th anniversary of International Women's Day this week, Sex Discrimination Commissioner Elizabeth Broderick is urging the private sector to follow suit on domestic violence leave, saying it costs employers $200 million a year in lost productivity and absenteeism..

"Domestic violence is the issue that dare not raise its name in business but it is most definitely a business issue because one in three women who experience domestic violence are in paid employment," she said.

Related Coverage

* Domestic violence victims granted leave The Daily Telegraph, 11 Feb 2011
* Violence at home remains hidden Courier Mail, 2 Jan 2011
* Women face paid leave backlash Perth Now, 5 Dec 2010
* Delay puts women in danger The Daily Telegraph, 27 Nov 2010
* Paid leave for domestic violence victims Courier Mail, 25 Nov 2010

"Employers need to recognise that a percentage of their staff is living with this every day. Most businesses at this point say, 'Sorry, domestic violence is a private matter.' Well, it is not and we need to change that paradigm."

As well as domestic violence leave, Ms Broderick wants employers to beef-up security measures in cases where women are being harassed by their partners at work - for example, by offering to change work email addresses and phone numbers.

"Down the track, this should affect hundreds of thousands of working women in this state and it will set the benchmark for employees across the country," said Australian Domestic and Family Violence Clearance House project officer Ludo McFerran, who is lobbying unions and businesses to step up to the plate.

"At any one time, up to 10 per cent of the workforce can be affected by domestic violence and it does have an impact on work performance and productivity.

"It is in the interest of business and employers to tackle this, and urgently."

Studies show stalking or harassment at work, failing to provide child care when promised or even hiding work clothes are common ways abusive men attempt to sabotage their partner's work efforts and financial security.

Read comments
Add comments

More related coverage

* Domestic violence an epidemic Courier Mail, 24 Nov 2010
* Why Matty and Wayne are not heroes The Daily Telegraph, 29 May 2010
* It's only fair - nappy leave for new dads The Daily Telegraph, 14 May 2010
* Job for the boys The Daily Telegraph, 17 Apr 2010

* Domestic violence officer to assist Coroner Courier Mail, 24 Nov 2010
* Family deaths review urged The Daily Telegraph, 29 May 2010

More related coverage
Related Searches

* Elizabeth Broderick,
* Queensland Centre,
* Violence Crisis Service,
* South Australia,
* Violence Death Review Coalition,
* Heather Nancarrow,
* Federal Government,
* Discrimination Commissioner Elizabeth Broderick,
* White Ribbon Day,
* Family Violence Research

and

http://www.legislati.../DLM417078.html
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#13 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 14 March 2011 - 04:39 PM

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Calendar of events for 2011

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March 2011
1 March VIC

Responding to sexual assault: level 1 - CASA House workshop
3 March Brussels, Belgium International Symposium: Zero Tolerance on Domestic Violence
4-5 March VIC

Infant Mental Health and Family Violence 2-day Experiential Training
March-November AUSTRALIA

Interactive Drawing Therapy training program
March-November VIC

Donna Zander & Assoc. Training Program 2011
7 March NSW

Report launch of ‘Seeking security: promoting women’s economic wellbeing following domestic violence'
7-8 March VIC

AIC Conference - Young people, risk and resilience: The challenges of alcohol drugs and violence

8 March QLD

Feminist Discussion Night
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Understanding Violence and Aggression: Theory and Therapy Techniques
8 & 22 March VIC

Walk in Her Shoes Tour
8 March - 14 October VIC

Vocational Graduate Certificate in Developmental Trauma - Australian Childhood Foundation training
9 March NSW

Advances in Aggression Therapy and Treatment
9 March NSW

Keeping children safe in the Family Law system: standing in the shoes of a child
9-10 March VIC

PARKAS (Parents Accepting Responsibility Kids Are Safe) 2-day Experiential Training
15 March VIC

Short-term physical, emotional and financial wellbeing after separation: does initiator status make a difference? Public seminar
15 March UK

Domestic Abuse: The impact on children and young people
17-18 March VIC Intimate Partner Sexual Violence: Best Practice Responses Forum and Training

17 March NSW

Towards Safer Relationships Out West: a forum for workers and community
17 March NSW

Healthy Relationships for Young People in Greater Western Sydney
18 March NSW Working Partnerships between Legal and Non-Legal Family Law Practitioners

22-25 March Toronto, Canada Canadian Domestic Violence Conference 2

22 March - 22 August NSW

Sensorimotor Psychotherapy Level 1: Applying somatic sequencing and body based approaches to trauma interventions - Australian Childhood Foundation training
22 March - 21 October WA

Vocational Graduate Certificate in Developmental Trauma - Australian Childhood Foundation training
23 March NSW

Access and Equity Consultations - Federation of Ethnic Communities’ Councils of Australia
23-24 March ACT

Law Support Training

25 March NSW

Domestic violence: the healing journey - Professor Jane Ursel
31 March NSW

Australia's response to child sexual abuse: expert panel discussion
April 2011
6 April VIC

Equal & Different: elder abuse and family violence forum

11-13 April Chicago, USA International Conference on Sexual Assault, Domestic Violence and Stalking
12 April VIC

Walk in Her Shoes Tour
16 - 18 April Kathmandu, Nepal Count Me In! South Asia Conference on Violence Against Marginalised Women
27-30 April QLD

Mothers at the Margins: 6th Australian International, Interdisciplinary Conference on Motherhood
May 2011
2 May NSW Safe from the start - Train the Trainer
5-7 May QLD AIJA Child Protection Conference
18-19 May NSW

Meeting the needs of victims of crime
20 May NSW Coffs Harbour Family Law Pathways Network 3rd Annual Conference
24 May NSW Safe from the start - Train the Trainer
24 May VIC Responding to sexual assault: level 2 - CASA House workshop
29 May-1 June

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Violence against women - complex realities and new issues in a changing world
30- 31 May QLD

Indigenous Family Violence Prevention Forum Let’s unite – stop the fight!
31 May NSW Justice for All? The International Criminal Court: A Conference – Ten Year Review CALL FOR PAPERS
June 2011
14 & 28 June VIC

Walk in Her Shoes Tour
July 2011
6-8 July NSW

Social Policy in a Complex World: Australian Social Policy Conference
14-15 July SA

United Against Domestic Violence-Engaging Men in Prevention

16-17 July NSW

Imagine...getting infant mental health right: national conference
August 2011
21-24 August Hobart, TAS

Making it happen - police and community
29 August - 2 September Sydney, NSW Australasian Evaluation Society 2011 International Conference
September 2011
11-14 September San Diego, USA

Institute on Violence, Abuse and Trauma’s 16th International Conference on Violence, Abuse and Trauma
October 2011
10-13 October Cape Town, South Africa

SVRI Forum 2011: Moving the agenda forward
November 2011
16-18 November Vancouver, Canada

Be Visible: the 2011 Canadian Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion Conference


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#14 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 14 March 2011 - 04:58 PM

http://www.austdvcle...se.unsw.edu.au/

University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia


UNSW Home > Media, News & Events
Seeking security from domestic violence

11th March 2011

Rochelle Braaf and Isobelle Barrett-Meyering

The significant impact of domestic violence on women’s security and safety has been highlighted in a national report by UNSW researchers, launched by Sex Discrimination Commissioner, Elizabeth Broderick.

A new national report by UNSW researchers has highlighted the significant impact domestic violence has on women’s financial security and safety.

Seeking Security: promoting women’s economic wellbeing following domestic violence was launched by Sex Discrimination Commissioner, Elizabeth Broderick, at UNSW this week.

Researchers, Dr Rochelle Braaf and Isobelle Barrett-Meyering, from UNSW’s Australian Domestic & Family Violence Clearinghouse, interviewed victims of domestic violence and service providers for the report.

Sex Discrimination Commissioner, Elizabeth Broderick

“This is the first Australian study to build a holistic picture of the impact of abusive
men’s behaviour on women’s financial security, both during the relationship and post-separation,” said Dr Braaf.

An estimated 15-17 per cent of Australian women are affected by domestic violence over the course of their lifetime, with an economic cost of around $13.6 billion to the Australian community.

The key finding of this research is that financial issues impact on women’s safety.

“Can she afford to leave, afford to change the locks, afford treatment for injuries? Many women are forced to leave their jobs, their homes and their support networks to flee violence. The worst case scenario is when women return to violent men because they can’t survive financially on their own,” Dr Braaf said.

Dr Braaf believes men need to be made more accountable for their abuse and it’s impact on women’s financial outcomes.

“They need to accountable for their share of debts, bills and child support payments and the criminal justice system needs to make them accountable for their abusive behaviour. We heard stories from many women about their ex-partners continuing to make vexatious court claims, costing women in lost work days, child care and legal costs – it’s a way for men to maintain control,” Dr Braaf said.

The report recommends that social security, legal systems, employers and financial institutions all be more responsive to women’s financial needs.

“For example, victim compensation should offer financial relief but is chronically underused by women experiencing domestic violence. The report makes recommendations to improve access to this avenue of justice for women,” said Barrett Meyering.

The report emphasises the importance of key services and employers developing strategies that promote women’s economic empowerment by building their financial capacity and creating economic opportunities.

Women want economic empowerment, Dr Braaf said. “Women want to be financially independent and secure, they are desperate to recover from their experiences and they need support to do that.”

If you or someone you know is in danger, call:

National Confidential Helpline: 1800 200 526
Men's helpline: 1300 78 99 78

Media contact: Fran Strachan | fran.strachan@unsw.edu.au | 9385 8732 | 0429 416 070


UNSW Sydney NSW 2052 Australia Telephone +61 2 9385 1000

Authorised by Director of Communications, UNSW, UNSW CRICOS Provider Code 00098G ABN 57 195 873 179

Page last updated: Friday 11 March 2011

http://www.austdvcle...se.unsw.edu.au/
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#15 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 30 March 2011 - 11:00 PM

Farida SULTANA has written a book with Shila Nair (Exisle Publishing) called "Purple Dandelion: A Muslim Woman's Struggle against Violence & Oppression".

It is due to be released on April 7, 2011.

http://www.shakti.org.nz

A percentage of the sales will be donated to Women against Violence.
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#16 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 04 November 2011 - 09:20 PM

Māori health promoter supports White Ribbon campaign

http://www.scoop.co....on-campaign.htm

Thursday, 3 November 2011, 10:32 am
Press Release: White Ribbon

2 November 2011

Māori health promoter wholeheartedly supports White Ribbon campaign


The White Ribbon Campaign welcomes Trevor Simpson (Tuhoe, Ngati Awa), as a new White Ribbon Ambassador in the fight to end violence against women”, says Families Commission Campaign Manager Rob McCann.

“The White Ribbon Campaign raises awareness of men’s violence against women with White Ribbon Ambassadors encouraging men to get involved by helping to challenge and change men’s abusive behaviour and attitudes towards women”.

Trevor, who works as a Senior Health Promotion Strategist for the Health Promotion Forum of New Zealand, is thrilled to be supporting the campaign which he believes is growing in prominence every year. His work as a Māori health promoter reminds him every day of the importance of violence-free homes.

“Through my work as a health promoter I know that a safe, protected and happy home environment is one of the key determinants of health. We know that when homes are experiencing violence and unrest, there are long term implications on a person’s health and wellbeing”.

Seeing too many Māori families affected by violence has inspired Trevor to become a White Ribbon Ambassador.

“In terms of the social determinants of health and wellbeing, Māori are over-represented in domestic violence statistics. We must draw attention to that fact that this is happening so that change can occur. I hope that all communities throughout New Zealand will no longer tolerate violence in our homes. By being a White Ribbon ambassador I will work to spread this message”.

The campaign is led by the Families Commission which actively supports a suite of family violence initiatives including the It’s not OK campaign, the Family Violence Clearinghouse, Family Violence Statistics report and the White Ribbon Campaign.

“I feel passionate about the campaign as it empowers communities to look at their own issues, resolve to make change and work together to find solutions. When this is coupled with support from government, social services and wider whānau, we can truly change behaviours and attitudes”.

The campaign uses male ambassadors to speak with other men and communities, an approach which has proven to be very successful. These ambassadors play a vital role in building support and promoting the white ribbon message within their social groups, workplaces and communities.

“I believe that White Ribbon ambassadors and men who get involved symbolise ‘nurturing warriors’ who together spread peaceful and powerful messages within their communities. They show other men how to be protectors and providers for their families, and above all how to do it in a non-violent manner” says Trevor.

For more information about the White Ribbon campaign, including the full range of activities happening in 2011, visit http://www.whiteribbon.org.nz.

Key messages of the White Ribbon Campaign


Violence towards women(hukildapsida says; anyone, not only women) is unacceptable


It is ok to ask for or offer help

• No violence is tolerable. If you know someone who is being frightened or intimidated by the behaviour of someone else, it is not OK.
• Violence isn’t just the physical, it’s also emotional or verbal behaviour used to control someone through fear. Things we say, or don’t say, contribute to the abuse.


Men must stand up and provide leadership


• White Ribbon Day is the international day when people, particularly men, wear a White Ribbon to show they won’t tolerate, condone or remain silent about violence towards women.
• It originated as a men’s movement in Canada and is now part of the United Nations annual calendar (International Day for Elimination of Violence Against Women). The Families Commission took a leadership role in New Zealand in 2006.

Men are part of the solution


• Whether you are a husband, father, brother, uncle or granddad – we all have women in our lives that we love, and wouldn’t want to see subjected to violence. We all want our children to grow up in a happy, healthy environment and to go on to have happy, healthy relationships.

• The campaign aims to change men’s attitudes and behaviours predominately through men talking to men, in ways that men understand. Men are role models for our children. We need to nurture a culture that encourages respect and rejects violence.

• Like our White Ribbon Ambassador Ruben Wiki, we can play sports with controlled aggression, ride bikes and engage in physical activities, but we must not bring violence into our homes.

• By simply wearing a White Ribbon, you can make it clear to other men that you do not tolerate violence against women.

• You can also make sure your home, your business or your sports club is a safe environment where abusive behaviour is not tolerated.

• The White Ribbon Campaign encourages men to talk openly about domestic violence, to break the silence around the subject. We encourage men to challenge comments, statements and actions that are abusive, and support those who wish to change their abusive behaviour.

Ambassadors

Ruben Wiki was the first White Ribbon Ambassador. There are now some 20 Ambassadors including the Prime Minister.
White Ribbon Ambassadors are chosen for:
• their support for the principles of the campaign.
• their willingness to challenge the behaviour of abusive men.
• their willingness to encourage others to do the same.
• their commitment to conveying the messages of the White Ribbon Campaign to other men within their community.

Statistics in New Zealand:


• In New Zealand most violence towards women takes place in the home.
• In violence between couples, it is men’s violence that is most likely to cause serious physical or psychological harm.
• An average of 14 women a year are killed by their partners or ex-partners.
• There are over 3500 convictions recorded against men each year for assaults on women.
• One in three women will experience partner violence at some point in their lives.

The Families Commission and White Ribbon Committee works with multiple agencies and NGOs to coordinate the national campaign. The White Ribbon campaign complements but is separate to the family violence It’s not OK campaign.
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#17 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 04 November 2011 - 09:35 PM

===What to look for===

Violence is deeply ingrained in abusers. Without legal intervention, the behaviour of violent men will likely worsen, yet even with it, up to 75% will reoffend. It is possible for anti-violence programmes to get them to stop, but real change takes years. An abuser can come from any walk of life or cultural background, but many of them share some common traits.

RIGID GENDER ROLES: The abuser has a strong belief in sex-role stereotypes, often expecting his partner to serve him. He believes women are inferior to men and only suited to menial work.

CONTROLLING BEHAVIOUR: He may believe utterly that his wants and needs are more important than his partner’s.

QUICK INVOLVEMENT: He may pressure her to commit to the relationship before she’s ready – often, women will be involved for less than six months before he advances to marriage.

UNREALISTIC EXPECTATIONS: He may expect his partner to meet all his needs, emotionally and domestically. He may also expect children to perform beyond their capabilities and punish them excessively.

JEALOUS AND POSSESSIVE: He may accuse her of flirting and having affairs, or become jealous of her time spent with others, reacting with violence to any suggestion that she might leave him.

USE OF THREATS AND MIND GAMES: He may threaten his partner with violence, taking the children, or suicide, with real potential for follow-through. He may say things that are cruel, but then be loving, which leaves her confused and torn.

USE OF FORCE OR COERCION FOR SEX: An abuser will often restrain his partner against her will during sex; act out fantasies in which the partner is helpless; force sex on a partner who is asleep; or demand sex when the partner is ill or tired.

DISPLAY OF FORCE AND CRUELTY TO ANIMALS: An abuser may demonstrate his potential for violence by breaking household items, by punching or kicking walls and doors or by physically abusing pets or other animals.

PERSUASIVE AND LOGICAL: An abuser is often a very reasonable, persuasive character to others whom he wants to take him at face value. The abuser sometimes presents a charming face to the world outside the home and strategises to ¬conceal the abuse from outsiders.

CONVINCED HE IS A VICTIM: Historically, abusive men were protected by traditions of privacy and the sanctity of marriage. Social values have changed and abusive men feel that they’ve had something taken away.

BLAMING HIS PARTNER: An abusive man will often blame his partner for his own shortcomings and his violence. He will use this to justify the violence by telling himself his partner is at fault.

OBSESSIVE BEHAVIOUR LIKE STALKING AFTER A BREAK-UP: An abuser often stalks and harasses his ex. He may make annoying and/or threatening phone calls, vandalise her property, assault her, breach court orders, follow her and appear at her workplace, the children’s school or her home.

FAMILY HISTORY OF VIOLENCE: Abusive men are likely to have been exposed to violence in their family. They are also likely to have a history of abusing previous partners.

MINIMISING HIS VIOLENCE: He will often refuse to acknowledge he has a problem or take responsibility for his actions. He will often deny there is violence, acknowledging only that there are “communication problems” between him and his partner.

MANIPULATION OF THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM: He may apply for a protection order in retaliation to one taken out against him. He may ask for continuances to delay court hearings and add to his partner’s financial hardship. He may defend himself so that he can directly question her on the witness stand. He may make false accusations to government agencies about his partner committing crimes such as child abuse.
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#18 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 04 November 2011 - 10:47 PM

http://www.2shine.org.nz/
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#19 User is offline   shulgin 

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 09:22 PM

70% of abuser abuse their children.
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#20 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 11:14 PM

The same should be made available for those who are entitled to or have Restraining Orders under the Harassment Act.

These people who also have "fears for their safety" and pets, are subjected to having to move to places where they may be unable to have them.

Abuse is often done by the very people who have histories of violence - physical & psychological - towards their former partners - they frequently just target someone else instead who may be equally as vulnerable and in need.


http://www.womensref...0as%20Pawns.pdf

http://www.womensref...do/Research.htm

http://www.law.virgi.../pdf/hr/vaw.pdf

http://www.3news.co....36/Default.aspx
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