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Solvent Poisoning,and Occupational cancer, my story.

#1 User is offline   Brucey 

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Posted 16 April 2016 - 04:29 PM

Mid 1972 I left school and began work as an apprentice automotive spray painter.
The company I began working for was typical of those at that time in small town New Zealand, Three panel beaters two painters, in a back alley industrial part of town. The paint shop was a small low ceiling four car shed, with a 24 inch extraction fan in the ceiling. And a spray booth large enough to just accommodate one car, with a larger fan at the far end.

It was the practice of the company at that time to do all rubbing down wet with mineral turpentine, initial preparation and between coats. No gloves were worn, I can remember my hands being covered in turps for hours at a time, almost every day. I can recall my hands tingling and the skin being very dry, cracking open to produce exposed wounds, and the tips of the fingers being worn down and bleeding because of the sandpaper wearing them down.

The spray booth was used for enamel repaints mainly, due to the need for a dust free environment, Most of the nitrocellulose lacquer and the acrylic lacquer was applied in the workshop, or outdoors if it was fine. I can remember working in a haze most of the time, and wearing only a dust mask, or nothing at all. I can recall feeling intoxicated or high on fumes, and recall one time where I actually passed out.

Two years into my apprenticeship the tradesman who was in charge of me dropped dead in the end of the spray booth, I was never told the cause of death. I remember he was in his fifties and not of good health. I remember him saying to me once,
"what did you choose this job for, you never see old car painters".

It was in my fourth year I was introduced to two pot isocyanate based paint in the form of a Lusteroid product called Acrythane. I was required to paint new Taskmaster forklifts with this product, off site at the factory that built them, in a small shed with no fan and only a dust mask for protection. There was a door at each end of the building that were opened to create an airflow, I recall working in a haze, and a bitter taste in my mouth. I remember having many headaches and feeling poorly at times. Gloves were never worn, and any paint on the hands was washed off using lacquer thinner, repeatedly through the day.

This was all par for the course back in the day, and when I look back it was atrocious working conditions we were subjected to, with workers being very ignorant of the health risks, it was an environment where production and a fast turnover was paramount.

I have been in the industry off and on since then, spending about twenty two years in all in the trade. I have worked in some very good establishments, and I have worked in some very bad ones.
Over the years there have been vast improvements in employer attitudes and safety in the workplace, the dodgey paint shops of old that I spent a lot of time in, are all but gone now.
We have spray bake ovens, and prep stations with down draft extrusion, air fed breathing apparatus, vacuum sanding technology, ventilated mixing rooms, and everyone is required to wear gloves, and eye protection.

But the one message I have never heard is that SOLVENTS CAUSE CANCER.

Boxing day 2014 I was involved in a serious car v motor cycle accident, I was admitted to Christchurch Hospital with extensive injuries. As a matter of course I was given a full body CT scan, as well as my orthopaedic injuries they found a 7cm mass in the upper pole of my right kidney. It was found to be a Renal Cell Carcinoma, and my kidney was removed.
That was fourteen months ago.
Had the tumour not been found when it was, I would have died.

Over the past eight years I have been presenting to my GPs with symptoms relating to solvent exposure, but to date none of the medical people involved in my health care have ever made the connection. Even when I was diagnosed with cancer, no one made the link.
By chance a couple of weeks ago I heard a discussion on the radio with a man called Tony Gibson, who lost his son to Occupational Cancer, his son Jason was a painter. Since then I have been in touch with Tony, his wife Annette, and Jasons wife Sonia, who have been very helpful and supportive towards me.
Sonia has agreed to assist me bring a claim against ACC for Occupational cancer.

http://gloveup.co.nz/

I have decided to document my case going forward, and tell my story so that others might benefit from it. Maybe there are others out there in the same position as me, who are not well and don't understand why, maybe there are some that have past away.

If all the medical people in my life over the last year failed to make the link between my exposure to solvents and other carcinogens, and my cancer. Then clearly the message needs to get out there, and that message is,

SOLVENTS CAUSE CANCER.
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#2 User is offline   INTER 

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Posted 16 April 2016 - 07:05 PM

No cancer that i no off, But no how you feel as i worked in a Lacquering can making & Printing plant for over 8 yrs.

and same as you we washed machines down with solvents by hand , splashing all over you getting the odd mouth fill :

Had some good stuff way back then in the late 70's, Could go to work feeling down : And go Home High As A KITE : strange thing i have also thought about those days.

as your_self and others you worked with, have all had or got some sort of G astrological , or Internal Issue. No an old painter who Carnot smell a dam thing now ;

he must have spent years smelling to much good stuff. A Few of us at the same factory all got hepatitis around the same time : and i was Convinced it was something
to do with the solvent & lacquering .

strange now but at the time you always thought poor Bugr dieing middle age, & worked at the factory for Years. Think i can recall 3 - 4 who passed away while i worked there.
they looked fine working 1 day sick the next and never came back to work, just passed away after short illness Yep Cancer.
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#3 User is offline   Alan Thomas 

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Posted 17 April 2016 - 05:32 PM

Brucy of the cocktail of chemistry you have been playing with by far isocyanate is the most dangerous. The solvents will assist the unmixed isocyanate get further into your system degree while cleaning your equipment. Isocyanate is capable of changing your DNA which of course is what cancer is, a mutation of the DNA. In general the various solvents will be broken down on your system much the same as alcohol
What you need to do is resist the urge to carry out your own diagnosis and simply make a list of all the different chemistry you have been involved and and taken along to your doctor for a provisional assessment as to potential who will then of course refer you through to a "toxicologist" as no one else is qualified to really give an opinion, including your own doctor. most toxicologists in New Zealand only want to deal with immediate exposure and not historical exposure.

Just looking at the solvent issue only you will find that most are going to be saying that to suffer cancer is quite rare and impossible to relate directly to your exposure. What I'm saying here is that the ACC are going to be able to obtain very large numbers of reports and opinions that will shoot that claim down in that format will stop

Various occupational specialists claim expertise in regards to toxicology however you are going to have extreme difficulty finding what that will deal with historical matters such as your own. Probably you are going to have to go overseas.



My own situation is that after I finished my toolmaking apprenticeship I spent a couple of years panel beating and spray painting in very much the same environment that you have described. I then went on to set up my own businesses signing and building machinery at which time I started another business that had the second largest polyurethane mixer in New Zealand which of course one of the main ingredients is isocyanate and the various solvents and cleaning fluids. My exposure was very heavy during the 1980s and again I was exposed during 2000-2001 at which time lymph nodes became enlarged and continued to be enlarged along with numerous other ailments such as hair falling out and a variety of skin disorders. 2006-2007 I was diagnosed as having lymph cancer and given a 50% chance of surviving six months. Nine months later the hospital finally addressed my doctor is very urgent request for treatment one of the lymph nodes were harvested for biopsy at which time it was discovered a different type of disorder not quite so lethal being only 10% chance of needing a lung transplant within the next two or three years which necessitated a treatment of chemotherapy which of course was very debilitating at a time when I was trying to present my own appeal to the district Court concerning my own case which could we had a great disadvantage as the ACC would not respond to the application for cover which has then been converted to a deemed decision in my favour. so therefore I have cover. However the ACC persistently ignore that decision in my favour and have not done a solitary thing to help. Both my doctor and the hospital have asked ACC to fund an assessment by a very well-known and well respected specialist dealing with toxic Chemical issues in Dunedin but the ACC claimed a conflict of interest as he was also working on their ACC toxicology panel, as does most of anyone who has any form of expertise regarding toxicology matters which of course makes it difficult for you to get a suitably qualified expert.

Another fellow who worked in what appears to be a similar environment you are self only painting with perhaps more exotic paints but including isocyanate-based paints has had his claim for isocyanate induced respiratory injury accepted by the ACC. Essentially he had been provided with a filter mask which had the wrong type of filters in it, as was the case with myself and perhaps even yourself. This type of chemistry should have a full face cover with an air supply obtaining its filtered air supply well outside of the work range.
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#4 User is offline   INTER 

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Posted 17 April 2016 - 06:46 PM

solvents in the work place

this would be a great topic for some young gun to do there Thesis on .

As there must be Thousands of current and past workers whom are or will be about to suffer the affects of work place solvent poisoning.

As ive got fried memory cells properly from years of solvent abuse : and i got paid to sniff it 12 hours a day lol .

so long ago i Carnot recall what they all were recall a couple of the not so bad smelling one's p100 p150 ISO something: an used to use around 200 ltrs of MEK a day will recall how you
felt after a 12 hour shift on that stuff : Legless :::::::::: and you came back day after day for another dose :

No gloves, no masks, No Brains Gee we were suckers for low paid death rates :
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#5 User is offline   Brucey 

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Posted 17 April 2016 - 11:38 PM

http://www.inchem.or...ol47/47-13.html



International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) - Summaries & Evaluations

OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURES IN PAINT MANUFACTURE AND PAINTING
Occupational exposure as a painter (Group 1)
Occupational exposure in paint manufacture (Group 3)



For definition of Groups, see Preamble Evaluation.

VOL.: 47 (1989) (p. 329)


5. Summary of Data Reported and Evaluation

5.1 Exposures


Approximately 200 000 workers worldwide are employed in paint manufacture. The total number of painters is probably several millions, a major group being construction painters. Other industries in which large numbers of painters are employed include manufacture of transportation equipment and metal products, automotive and other refinishing operations and furniture manufacture.

Thousands of chemical compounds are used in paint products as pigments, extenders, binders, solvents and additives. Painters are commonly exposed by inhalation to solvents and other volatile paint components; inhalation of less volatile and nonvolatile components is common during spray painting. Dermal contact is the other major source of exposure. Painters may be exposed to other chemical agents that they or their coworkers use.

Painters are commonly exposed to solvents, the main ones being petroleum solvents, toluene, xylene, ketones, alcohols, esters and glycol ethers. Chlorinated hydrocarbons are used in paint strippers and less frequently in paint formulations. Benzene was used as a paint solvent in the past but is currently found in only small amounts in some petroleum solvent-based paints. Titanium dioxide and chromium and iron compounds are used widely as paint pigments, while lead was used commonly in the past. Asbestos has been used as a paint filler and may occur in spackling and taping compounds; painters in the construction industry and shipyards may also be exposed to asbestos. Exposure to silica may occur during the preparation of surfaces in construction and metal painting.

Workers in paint manufacture are potentially exposed to the chemicals that are found in paint products, although the patterns and levels of exposure to individual agents may differ from those of painters. Construction painters may be exposed to dusts and pyrolysis products during the preparation of surfaces and to solvents in paints, although water-based paints have become widely used recently. In metal and automobile painting, metal-based antirust paints and solvent-based paints are often applied by spraying; in addition, newer resin systems, such as epoxy and polyurethane, are commonly used. In contrast to other painting trades, furniture finishing involves the use of more varnishes, which have evolved from cellulose-based to synthetic resin varnishes, including amino resins which may release formaldehyde.
5.2 Human carcinogenicity data


The reports most relevant for assessing the risk for cancer associated with occupational exposures in paint manufacture and painting are three large cohort studies of painters and collections of national statistics on cancer incidence and mortality in which data on cancer at many sites were presented for painters. These show a consistent excess of all cancers, at about 20% above the national average, and a consistent excess of lung cancers, at about 40% above the national average. The available evidence on the prevalence of smoking in painters, although limited, indicates that an excess risk for lung cancer of this magnitude cannot be explained by smoking alone. The risks for cancers of the oesophagus, stomach and bladder were raised in many of the studies, but the excesses were generally smaller and more variable than those for lung cancer. Some of the studies also reported excess risks for leukaemia and for cancers of the buccal cavity and larynx.

Several other small cohort and census-based studies in painters provided estimates of risk for cancer at one or several sites. The risk for lung cancer was reported to be raised in eight, that for stomach cancer in two, that for bladder cancer in two, that for leukaemia in four, that for malignancies of the lymphatic system in three, that for buccal cancer in three, that for laryngeal cancer in one, that for skin cancer in one, and that for prostatic cancer in three. In many studies, risks for cancer were reported only for sites for which the result was statistically significant.

In the three cohort studies of workers involved in the manufacture of paint, two of which were small, there was little to suggest an excess risk of lung cancer or of cancer at any other anatomical site.

Eleven case-control and related studies of lung cancer could be evaluated. All of the studies showed an increased risk for lung cancer among painters. The five studies in which smoking was taken into account showed an increase of 30% or more in risk for lung cancer. Two studies suggested increased risks among painters for laryngeal cancer, and one indicated an increased risk for mesothelioma.

Cancer of the urinary tract has been examined in relation to exposure to paint in 15 case-control and related studies. Eight showed an excess risk for bladder cancer in all painters. In certain studies, specific aspects of exposure to paint were examined: car painters were addressed in two studies, one indicating an excess risk; spray painters were evaluated in three studies, two of which showed an excess risk; and exposure to lacquer and chromium was associated with a risk in one study.

In a study of occupational histories of patients with oesophageal and stomach cancers, high risks were seen for painters. A further study also identified a risk for stomach cancer and another a risk for oesophageal cancer. One study of cancer of the gall-bladder and of the biliary tract showed associations with the occupation of painting. A study of pancreatic cancer reported a high risk for exposure to paint thinners.

Five studies of leukaemia mentioned painters. Two studies showed excess risks. Two small studies of Hodgkin's disease and three studies of multiple myeloma showed increased risks in association with the occupation of painter or with any exposure to paints, paint-related products or organic solvents.

A single study of prostatic cancer showed a significant excess risk for manufacturers of paints and varnishes, and one study reported a high risk for testicular cancer among spray painters.

Twelve studies of childhood cancer mentioned paternal exposure to paint and related substances; four of these also presented data on maternal exposure. Three studies showed an excess of childhood leukaemia in association with paternal exposure and one in association with maternal exposure. Two studies showed an excess risk for brain tumours in the children of male painters. One small study of children with Wilms' tumour showed an excess in those whose fathers were painters. All of these excesses are based on small numbers of children whose parents had been exposed, even in the larger studies. In the other studies, no association was seen between parental exposure to paint and childhood cancers. The type and timing of exposure varied among these studies.
5.3 Other relevant data


Painters may suffer from allergic and nonallergic contact dermatitis, chronic bronchitis and asthma, and adverse effects on the nervous system. There is also some indication of adverse effects in the liver, kidney, blood and blood-forming organs. Many of these effects are also seen in paint production workers.

Of three studies on the fertility of painters, two showed no adverse effect and the third a possible excess frequency of infertility in men. One study reported an excess frequency of spontaneous abortion in female painters, based on self-reported data. Studies of birth weight, perinatal mortality rates and congenital malformations in the offspring of male painters generally showed no adverse effects; few data on female painters were available.

No increase in the frequency of sister chromatid exchange in peripheral lymphocytes was found in one study of painters or in one study of paint manufacturing workers.
5.4 Evaluation


There is sufficient evidence for the carcinogenicity of occupational exposure as a painter.

There is inadequate evidence for the carcinogenicity of occupational exposure in paint manufacture.
Overall evaluation


Occupational exposure as a painter is carcinogenic (Group 1).

Occupational exposure in paint manufacture is not classifiable as to its carcinogenicity (Group 3).

For definition of the italicized terms, see Preamble Evaluation.



Last updated 01/21/1998
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#6 User is offline   Brucey 

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Posted 17 April 2016 - 11:42 PM

https://en.wikipedia...pational_cancer


Occupational cancer
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search Occupational cancer is cancer caused by occupational hazards. Several cancers have been directly tied to occupational hazards, including chimney sweeps' carcinoma, mesothelioma, and others.




Contents
[hide]


Common occupational hazards implicated in cancer[edit]
Occupational exposure to chemicals, dusts, radiation, and certain industrial processes have been tied to occupational cancer.

Chemicals: Exposure to cancer-causing chemicals, also called Carcinogens, may cause mutations that allow cells to grow out of control, causing cancer. Carcinogens in the workplace may include chemicals like anilines, chromates, dinitrotoluenes, arsenic and inorganic arsenic compounds, beryllium and beryllium compounds, cadmium compounds, nickel compounds [1]

Dusts: leather or wood dusts, asbestos,[2] crystalline forms of silica, coal tar pitch volatiles, coke oven emissions, diesel exhaust and environmental tobacco smoke[1]

Radiation: sunlight; radon gas; industrial, medical, or other exposure to ionizing radiation

Industrial Processes: aluminum production; iron and steel founding; underground mining with exposure to uranium or radon

Other factors that play a role in cancer include:[3]

  • Personal characteristics such as age, sex, and race
  • Family history of cancer
  • Diet and personal habits such as cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption
  • The presence of certain medical conditions or past medical treatments, including chemotherapy, radiation treatment, or some immune-system suppressing drugs.
  • Exposure to cancer-causing agents in the environment (for example, sunlight, radon gas, air pollution, and infectious agents)

Occupational cancers[edit]
Common cancers and their exposures and occupations include:[2]

CancerSourceExamples of OccupationsBladderBenzidine, beta-naphthylamine, 4-aminobiphenyl, arsenic

Rubber, leather, paving, roofing, printing and textile industries; paint/

dyeing products; chimney sweeping;

machinists; hairdressers and barbers;

truck drivers

KidneyCadmium, trichloroethylene, herbicides, wood dust

Painting; metalworking; petroleum, plastics, and textile industries

LarynxAsbestos, wood dust, paint fumesMetal working; petroleum, rubber, plastics, and textile industries

LeukemiaFormaldehyde, benzene, ethylene oxide, pesticides

Rubber manufacturing; oil refining; shoemaking

LiverArsenic, vinyl chloride, aflatoxinsPlastic manufacturingLungRadon, secondhand smoke, asbestos, arsenic, cadmium, chromium compounds,

diesel exhaust, sulfur mustard

Rubber manufacturing, paving, roofing, painting, chimney sweeping,

iron and steel foundry work, welding

LymphomaBenzene, 1, 3-butadiene, ethylene oxide, herbicides, insecticides

Rubber manufacturing, painting, hairdresser or barber

MesotheliomaAsbestosMining, railroad, automotive, plumbing, painting and construction

industries; factory workers

Nasal cavity and sinusMustard gas, nickel dust, chromium dust, leather dust, wood dust, radium

Textile and baking industry, flour milling, nickel refining, furniture and

cabinet builders, shoemaking

SkinArsenic, coal tars, paraffin, certain oils, sunlight

Chimney sweeping; outside jobs that involve a lot of sun exposure


Epidemiology[edit]
An estimated 48,000 cancers are diagnosed yearly in the US that come from occupational causes; this represents approximately 4-10% of total cancer in the United States.[4] It is estimated that 19% of cancers globally are attributed to environmental exposures (including work-related exposures).[5]


Prevention[edit]
Many occupational cancers are preventable. Personal protective gear, workplace controls, and worker education can prevent exposure to carcinogens in the workplace. Tobacco smoking has also been shown to increase the risk of work-related cancers; decreasing or abstaining from smoking can decrease cancer risk.[2]

Agencies like the US Food and Drug Administration, Environmental Protection Agency, and Occupational Safety and Health Administration have developed safety standards and limits for chemical and radiation exposure.[2]


References[edit]
<img src="//en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Special:CentralAutoLogin/start?type=1x1" alt="" title="" width="1" height="1" style="border: none; position: absolute;" /> Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia...oldid=704737391" Categories:
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#7 User is offline   Brucey 

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Posted 17 April 2016 - 11:46 PM

http://chemicalpoisoningnz.webs.com/

Chemical Poisoning NZ

Exposure to harmful chemicals in every day life

Introduction - site last updated March 2010
Try: <a href="https://www.facebook.com/djwearing">https://www.facebook.com/djwearing
UNDER facelift over next two weeks will include updated info, March 2014

Hello and welcome to this site. I have created this site to offer help to those of you who suspect your health or someone you know maybe effected by chemicals.
I am not a doctor or health professional but I can offer some information and advise that I have gathered over the time of my illness. I do not intend to say what's best for you as only you can make those choices but I would like to tell you about my situation and offer you some other sites to visit - hopefully there will be some info that might help you with your condition.
My name is Dj, I have been in the Automotive Spray painting trade for over twenty-two years and in this time I have been exposed to hundreds of chemicals (I will list these later). I have been diagnosed (2006) with Chronic Solvent Neurotoxicity (chemical poisoning) - Damaging the Brain, Central Nervous System, Respiratory System (Sinuses), Immune System (Sensitivities) along with potentual damage to major organs like the Liver and Kidneys and Lungs, pretty much your whole body's health system.
Depending on the severity of this condition, to what will be obvious from a medical point of view, a lot of doctors don't recognize Chemical/Toxin poisoning due to a lack of training in this field. They seem to pick out one or two symptoms (head aches/sinus/fatigue/muscle and joint pain) and treat the symptoms and not the cause.
It's not until you put all the symptoms together and look at what has caused these symptoms eg: exposures to chemicals through your occupation/hobbies/around the home/living next to horticulturist/factories etc that you tend to see the full picture, even now Dr's daignose cancer how often do they look at what caused it? or do they just carry on treating the symptoms.
Importantly the first question you could ask yourself is what do I do for a job; this includes your past years of employment, your hobbies, what you do in your home life and then secondly ask yourself the question what chemicals have I been in contact with - this could range from solvents, glues, cleaners, petrochemicals (which can include medications) paints, pesticides, petrol, (perfumes some contain Toleune a known cancer causing chemical) and thousands more chemicals hidden in so many products eg: fly spray, fragrances, plastics, deodourants etc.
For me I know if something has affected me as I have tell-tail signs. I get light headed, the back of my head/top of my neck tightens up, head aches set in, my thinking starts slowing down, I find it harder to pick the words I need, my spelling deteriorates, my judgement worsens and I have mood swings along with a short fuse and then after all that the fatigue sets in and all my coping skills disappear (I have fatigue all the time, it just increases at these times) this makes life very difficult for my family and friends not to mention myself.
This type of illness is hard to deal with as it's not obvious to others and you can still operate usually at alot lower level but many people don't realize the effort that has to be put in just to do the same things as others do and don't give a second thought too, it's a constant fight against fatigue, cognitive limitations, decreased memory, multi tasking, concentration/attention impairments along with frontal lobe damage which affects executive functions (problem solving, mental and emotional control, mental flexibility) not a easy thing for the patient and their families to understand or recognise let alone Joe public.

TWO TYPES OF CHEMICAL POISIONG
In the cases I know of or have read about it seems there is two types of chemical poisoning; the one off acute exposure and the second is gradual process (usually years of exposure). I feel the gradual process injury is the hardest one to recognise as it slowly creeps up on you, I know I put some things down to just getting older like sore joints, tired muscles, fatigue, memory etc - things that on their own are not abnormal but add them all together along with your medical symptoms as well as knowing what to look for regarding symptomology of chemical poisoning, the picture becomes clearer.
For me after twenty years of Headaches, Sinuses, Mood Swings and worsening Fatigue, the answer came in the form of a documentry on TV regarding - the poisoning of a worker washing plastic bottles with chemicals (you will find this documentary under 'other peoples stories'). http://tvnz.co.nz/view/page/822477
The workers symptoms fitted mine like a glove, this starthttp://tvnz.co.nz/view/page/822477ed my journey down the path of finding out firstly what illness I had and secondly what was causing my illness.
The first thing I did was to make contact with Professor Bill Glass (Occupational Medicine Specialist) based in Christchurch NZ through my GP, (Prof Glass featured in this doco).
The first thing he asked me was what did I do for a living, probably the most relevant question that any Dr can ask, he said he tells all the doctors he lectures to look at the patients work history, as in my case it was so important, I told him I had over twenty two years of chemical exposure in the spray-painting industry.
He gave me some Neuropsychological Short Battery Tests to check my Attention/Short Term Memory, Sensory Motor Speed, Verbal Memory,Long Term Memory and Visual Memory - which showed some deficits along with my medical history and family and work history .
Professor Glass's diagnosis was Chronic Solvent Neurotoxicity and he suggested my Doctor initiate a claim with ACC and for me to do a more intensive Neuropsychological Assessment by a Clinical Psychologist with experience in this field.
At this point I must tell you it is so important to only see Medical Specialists that have experience in the field of Toxins, Chemicals and the Environment they are used in, as a misdiagnosis can send you down the wrong track and put your treatment back years, not to mention not removing you from what is causing your illness.
Posted Image

Neuropsychological testing

I was sent by ACC to Debbie Snell Clinical Neuropsychologist based at Selwyn Street Christchurch for my testing, this was paid for by ACC as part of assessing my condition. I found Dr Snell very thorough and accurate it was obivous she had experience in this field later telling me she has dealt with others with Neurotoxicity.

These tests only pick up on the impairments regarding Neuropsychological functioning and not all the other related effects of chemical poisoning such as fatigue and headaches etc.

Once ACC received Dr Snell's report that supported my original diagnosis from Prof Glass, they then insisted I have a Psychiatric report done to make sure I don't have an underlying psychiatric condition that my be causing my illness. This report was carried out by Dr A D MaCleod based at Burwood Hospital Christchurch. He confirmed I had no underlying psychiatric condition.

The message I got from all these specialists, books, internet and other suffers was AVOIDANCE this is paramount in dealing with chemicals.



ACC Claim

Having fulfilled all my obligations for my claim with ACC I thought I could now move onto treating the chemical poisioning along with rehabilatation.

But no it's not that simple when dealing with ACC, my Case Manager kept minimising my illness by saying " your brain is just a bit mixed up it will come right" and "you only use 5% of your brain so there is plenty left to use" at the time I was speechless it wasn't till sometime after that I realized how dangerous it was having an ACC clerk dealing with people with medical conditions that they have no idea about, it was this very type of scenario that can do devastating damage to the brain damaged people they're dealing with.

I will do a chapter on ACC (the good, bad and the ugly) as three years on and they're still pushing the exit strategy instead of treatment/rehabilitation (it's all about the $$$)



Opinions

Some Doctors / ACC doctors say the chemicals would flush out of your system after a short period of time which is half true, as some solvents for example will pass through but the truth is it's a bit like a bullet passing through your body and exiting out the other side the bullet may be gone but the carnage of where it's been is still there, plus a lot of chemicals accumulate in your fat tissues (including heavy metals) which won't just disappear on their own. (see link on Heavy Metals) Again I have to mention only deal with Dr's that have experience in this field and are reccommended by someone you trust as some Dr's ACC send you to are very biased in the favour of ACC.

As the leglisation stands at the moment (2010) you the client have the right to choose your medical professionals.




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#8 User is offline   Alan Thomas 

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Posted 18 April 2016 - 11:12 AM

Brucy

You seem to have highlighted that something that appears to be commonplace in as much as ACC clerks are making medical diagnosis and recommending treatment. Of course without a medical qualification and practising certificates that would be illegal.

It appears to me that your case manager has made a medical diagnosis by saying your brain is a bit mixed up.
And has gone on to provide a medical prognosis that it will come right.
And has then gone on to claim of medical fact that you only use 5% of your brain and that the remainder of the brain could compensate for the deficiency.
There are several issues here one as to whether or not your case manager had a medical basis for the information expressed, whether or not they had a medical qualification for this information, whether or not the information was solicited by you as a patient and whether or not the case manager was directly challenging the medical information provided, assuming of course you have got medical reports describing a brain injury related to the cocktail of chemicals AND the causal nexus motivating their response to you such as whether they had your well-being at heart or was there a financial motivation involved.

Has your case manager broken the law?
Has your case manager broken the law for an illegal financial advantage?
Did your case manager produce a document with this so-called medical information for purposes of this financial gain?

If you answer yes to the above I would suggest you go to the police as this matter goes well beyond what can be called a civil decision mistake as clearly the case manager would not be qualified to say what they did and definitely were motivated with something other than your well-being.


ACC Claim

Having fulfilled all my obligations for my claim with ACC I thought I could now move onto treating the chemical poisioning along with rehabilatation.

But no it's not that simple when dealing with ACC, my Case Manager kept minimising my illness by saying " your brain is just a bit mixed up it will come right" and "you only use 5% of your brain so there is plenty left to use" at the time I was speechless it wasn't till sometime after that I realized how dangerous it was having an ACC clerk dealing with people with medical conditions that they have no idea about, it was this very type of scenario that can do devastating damage to the brain damaged people they're dealing with.

I will do a chapter on ACC (the good, bad and the ugly) as three years on and they're still pushing the exit strategy instead of treatment/rehabilitation (it's all about the $$$)
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#9 User is offline   Brucey 

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Posted 18 April 2016 - 12:53 PM

So far in this thread I have not mentioned my case manager as having any involvement in investigations into my recent suspected health problems relating to possible solvent exposure.

Acc are as yet not involved in any way.

My enquires to date have been instigated by myself, My Gp has referred me to Dr Glass, and has been in contact with the Urologist that found my cancer and the Oncologist that removed it.

I have had symptoms that relate to solvent poisoning for about eight years, It was not until I spoke with Tony Gibson and his family a few weeks ago, that I made a connection with my various long standing health issues and my occupation.

Mr Thomas, you have made some accusations re my case manager that have no basis what so ever, I certainly have not "highlighted" anything aboutACC clerks making medical diagnosis and recommending treatment, as you state, and my case manager has never made any comment about my mental state, she has not made any comment at all or submitted any information, because she has not been informed as yet.

I would appreciate it if you would keep your delusional BS to your own threads, this thread is about my story.
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#10 User is offline   Alan Thomas 

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Posted 18 April 2016 - 02:40 PM

View PostBrucey, on 18 April 2016 - 12:53 PM, said:

So far in this thread I have not mentioned my case manager as having any involvement in investigations into my recent suspected health problems relating to possible solvent exposure.

Acc are as yet not involved in any way.

My enquires to date have been instigated by myself, My Gp has referred me to Dr Glass, and has been in contact with the Urologist that found my cancer and the Oncologist that removed it.

I have had symptoms that relate to solvent poisoning for about eight years, It was not until I spoke with Tony Gibson and his family a few weeks ago, that I made a connection with my various long standing health issues and my occupation.

Mr Thomas, you have made some accusations re my case manager that have no basis what so ever, I certainly have not "highlighted" anything aboutACC clerks making medical diagnosis and recommending treatment, as you state, and my case manager has never made any comment about my mental state, she has not made any comment at all or submitted any information, because she has not been informed as yet.

I would appreciate it if you would keep your delusional BS to your own threads, this thread is about my story.


Brucy I refer to The posting you made number 7
The posting is written in the first person which led me to assume you wrote it.
If you are not the author then my comments apply to the author.
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#11 User is offline   REX 

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Posted 18 April 2016 - 02:59 PM

View PostAlan Thomas, on 18 April 2016 - 02:40 PM, said:

Brucy I refer to The posting you made number 7
The posting is written in the first person which led me to assume you wrote it.
If you are not the author then my comments apply to the author.



It certainly reads as if he has a case manager, Consulted his case manager about being treated for the chemical poisoning and stated there were "opinions" of Drs who were bias.




Pretty confused alright. :rolleyes:/>


[

View PostBrucey, on 17 April 2016 - 11:46 PM, said:

ACC Claim

Having fulfilled all my obligations for my claim with ACC I thought I could now move onto treating the chemical poisioning along with rehabilatation.

But no it's not that simple when dealing with ACC, my Case Manager kept minimising my illness by saying " your brain is just a bit mixed up it will come right" and "you only use 5% of your brain so there is plenty left to use" at the time I was speechless it wasn't till sometime after that I realized how dangerous it was having an ACC clerk dealing with people with medical conditions that they have no idea about, it was this very type of scenario that can do devastating damage to the brain damaged people they're dealing with.

I will do a chapter on ACC (the good, bad and the ugly) as three years on and they're still pushing the exit strategy instead of treatment/rehabilitation (it's all about the $)



Opinions

Some Doctors / ACC doctors say the chemicals would flush out of your system after a short period of time which is half true, as some solvents for example will pass through but the truth is it's a bit like a bullet passing through your body and exiting out the other side the bullet may be gone but the carnage of where it's been is still there, plus a lot of chemicals accumulate in your fat tissues (including heavy metals) which won't just disappear on their own. (see link on Heavy Metals) Again I have to mention only deal with Dr's that have experience in this field and are reccommended by someone you trust as some Dr's ACC send you to are very biased in the favour of ACC.

As the leglisation stands at the moment (2010) you the client have the right to choose your medical professionals.



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#12 User is offline   Brucey 

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Posted 18 April 2016 - 03:13 PM

There is a link at the top of the page clearly showing I am not the author.
The author gives his name as DJ. and the article is dated 2010.
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#13 User is offline   REX 

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Posted 18 April 2016 - 03:19 PM

View PostBrucey, on 18 April 2016 - 03:13 PM, said:

There is a link at the top of the page clearly showing I am not the author.


OK lets move on,sometimes full pages get broken up and comments thereafter..
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#14 User is offline   Alan Thomas 

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Posted 18 April 2016 - 06:09 PM

View PostBrucey, on 18 April 2016 - 03:13 PM, said:

There is a link at the top of the page clearly showing I am not the author.


So nothing on post 7 has any connection to you.
We have rules that stop this type of confusion. please read them.

Lets get back to the important issues of what we with these problem common to yours should do and help one another..
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#15 User is offline   INTER 

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Posted 18 April 2016 - 06:09 PM

You need to make it Clear you are Quoting from A link Etc.

AS I Read it as you were Giving an update on your own Case .
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#16 User is offline   Brucey 

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Posted 18 April 2016 - 06:39 PM

View PostAlan Thomas, on 18 April 2016 - 06:09 PM, said:

So nothing on post 7 has any connection to you.
We have rules that stop this type of confusion. please read them.

Lets get back to the important issues of what we with these problem common to yours should do and help one another..


The connection to me is that DJ is also a car painter, claiming to be in a similar situation to me. he makes relative remarks and observations, and puts forward a great deal of information.


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#17 User is offline   Brucey 

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Posted 18 April 2016 - 07:05 PM

http://www.cdc.gov/n...r/npotocca.html


OCCUPATIONAL CANCER


Carcinogen List
Posted Image

The following is a list of substances NIOSH considers to be potential occupational carcinogens.

A number of the carcinogen classifications deal with groups of substances: aniline and homologs, chromates, dintrotoluenes, arsenic and inorganic arsenic compounds, beryllium and beryllium compounds, cadmium compounds, nickel compounds, and crystalline forms of silica. There are also substances of variable or unclear chemical makeup that are considered carcinogens, coal tar pitch volatiles, coke oven emissions, diesel exhaust and environmental tobacco smoke.

Some of the potential carcinogens listed in this index may be re-evaluated by NIOSH as new data become available and the NIOSH recommendations on these carcinogens either as to their status as a potential occupational carcinogen or as to the appropriate recommended exposure limit may change.

A B C D E-G H-K M N P R-S T U-Z

A
Acetaldehyde
2-Acetylaminofluorene
Acrylamide
Acrylonitrile
Aldrin
4-Aminodiphenyl
Amitrole
Aniline and homologs
o-Anisidine
p-Anisidine
Arsenic and inorganic arsenic compounds
Arsine
Asbestos
Asphalt fumes


B
Benzene
Benzidine
Benzidine-based dyes
Beryllium
Butadiene
tert-Butyl chromate; class, chromium hexavalent

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C
Cadmium dust and fume
Captafol
Captan
Carbon black (exceeding 0.1% PAHs)
Carbon tetrachloride
Chlordane
Chlorinated camphene
Chlorodiphenyl (42% chlorine); class polychlorinated biphenyls
Chlorodiphenyl (54% chlorine); class polychlorinated biphenyls
Chloroform
Chloromethyl methyl ether
bis(Chloromethyl) ether
B-Chloroprene
Chromium, hexavalent [Cr(VI)]
Chromyl chloride; class, chromium hexavalent
Chrysene
Coal tar pitch volatiles; class, coal tar products
Coke oven emissions


D
DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane)
Di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP)
2,4-Diaminoanisoleo
o-Dianisidine-based dyes
1,2-Dibromo-3-chloropropane (DBCP)
Dichloroacetylene
p-Dichlorobenzene
3,3'-Dichlorobenzidine
Dichloroethyl ether
1,3-Dichloropropene
Dieldrin
Diesel exhaust
Diglycidyl ether (DGE); class, glycidyl ethers
4-Dimethylaminoazobenzene
Dimethyl carbomoyl chloride
1,1-Dimethylhydrazine; class, hydrazines
Dimethyl sulfate
Dinitrotoluene
Dioxane

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E-G
Environmental tobacco smoke
Epichlorohydrin
Ethyl acrylate
Ethylene dibromide
Ehtylene dichloride
Ethylene oxide
Ethyleneimine
Ethylene thiourea
Formaldehyde
Gallium arsenide
Gasoline


H-K
Heptachlor
Hexachlorobutadiene
Hexachloroethane
Hexamethyl phosphoric triamide (HMPA)
Hydrazine
Kepone

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M
Malonaldehyde
Methoxychlor
Methyl bromide; class, monohalomethanes
Methyl chloride
Methyl iodide; class, monohalomethanes
Methyl hydrazine; class, hydrazines
4,4'-Methylenebis(2-chloroaniline) (MBOCA)
Methylene chloride
4,4-Methylenedianiline (MDA)


N
a-Naphylamine
B-Naphylamine
Nickel, metal, soluble, insoluble, and inorganic; class, nickel, inorganic
Nickel carbonyl
Nickel sulfide roasting
4-Nitrobiphenyl
p-Nitrochlorobenzene
2-Nitronaphthalene
2-Nitropropane
N-Nitrosodimethylamine

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P
Pentachloroethane; class, chloroethanes
N-Phenyl-b-naphthylamine; class, b-naphthalene
Phenyl glycidyl ether; class, glycidyl ethers
Phenylhydrazine; class, hydrazines
Propane Sultone
B-Propiolactone
Propylene dichloride
Proplyene imine
Propylene oxide


R-S
Radon
Rosin core solder, pyrolysis products (containing formaldehyde)
Silica, crystalline cristobalite
Silica, crystalline quartz
Silica, crystalline tripoli
Silica, crystalline tridymite
silica, fused
Soapstone, total dust silicates

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T
Tremolite silicates
2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) (dioxin)
1,1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane
Tetrachloroethylene
Titanium dioxide
o-Tolidine-based dyes
o-Tolidine
Toluene diisocyanate (TDI)
Toluene diamine (TDA)
o-Toluidine
p-Toluidine
1,1,2-Trichloroethane; class, chloroethanes
Trichloroethylene
1,2,3-Trichloropropane


<a name="uz" class="tp-link-policy" id="uz">U-Z
Uranium, insoluble compounds Uranium, soluble compounds
Vinyl bromide; class, vinyl halides
Vinyl chloride
Vinyl cyclohexene dioxide
Vinylidene chloride (1,1-dichloroethylene); class, vinyl halides)
Welding fumes, total particulates
Wood dust
Zinc chromate; class, chromium hexavalent




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#18 User is offline   Rosey 

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Posted 18 April 2016 - 09:37 PM

Thanks Brucey. Much appreciated.

Family member in the old printing industry is very ill, so his wife would like this.
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#19 User is offline   Alan Thomas 

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Posted 18 April 2016 - 11:11 PM

Brucy I have had very significant exposure to most of those chemicals and substances and also suffer from both long-term exposure and sudden catastrophic and overwhelming exposure too one chemical that required immediate hospital treatment. the experts dealing with chemical injuries tell me that it is practically impossible to determine precisely which chemicals have caused the actual injuries and have to go on the balance of probability. The difficulty indicates such as yours and mine (and others) is distinguishing the difference between potential and actual as the ACC legislation requires proof of the actual injury. Chemical injuries are therefore notoriously difficult to obtain accepted claims which is the reason why I have provided you with the advice I have.

Rosie as a child I grew up helping dad in his printing company and even as a child recognise that he was succumbing to the effects of the chemistry here is involved in. Obviously I would have been at risk as a child being in that environment. Again the difficulty is proving the cause and effect even though the anecdotal evidence may seem obvious to us all.

I am in the unique position of having very obvious injuries directly relevant to accident events with hospital records. In addition as the ACC did not make a decision within the time limit my claim was automatically accepted with the result that the ACC must now disapprove at a very high standard of proof that I was not injured as described which is of course a complete impossibility. The primary chemical injuries most probably relate to isocyanate and beryllium both of which cause DNA changes of which there is extensive evidence supported by actual biopsies and a large number of CT scans. Nonetheless the ACC are ignoring their duty to determine the degree of incapacity and disability demonstrating the nature of the ACCs mindset when it comes to chemical injuries. They just don't want to know.
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#20 User is offline   greg 

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Posted 19 April 2016 - 01:53 PM

There was a Dr Ricky Gorringe;
Ricky Gorringe
Ricky Gorringe began his interest in health and fitness with a successful running career. He set several records before pursuing an initial career as a physical eductation teacher with a Dip Phys Ed, Dip Tchg. He went on to complete a BSc in biochemistry before qualifying as a doctor with an MBChB. Following this he worked in general practice in Cambridge and Papua New Guinea before becoming MRNZCGP (Member of the Royal NZ College of General Practitioners). After he developed ME (myelgic encephalomyelitis) from chemical poisoning, he turned to the area of complementary medicine to regain health, due to the limitations of traditional medicine and drug therapy.

Over the last 20 years he has trained in bio-energy medicine and BDORT (Bi-Digital O-Ring Testing), initially under Dr Gerald Gibb, Auckland, and then Professor Yoshiako Omura, New York. He has attended numerous seminars and training courses both overseas and in New Zealand.
He has developed an avid interest in naturopathic, nutritional medicine and homeopathy, spending four years at BOP School of Homeopathy.
Ricky enjoys cycling and half-marathon running.

http://www.waikatohe...Who+we+are.html
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