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Quentin DOIG - Timeline & info NZ Police Fraud Squad, ACC, Housing NZ etc etc

#21 User is offline   hukildaspida 

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Posted 24 January 2012 - 02:43 PM

Cuts alarm former chief: [3 Edition]

REID, Neil. Evening Post [Wellington, New Zealand] 27 June 1997: 1.

Massive cuts to the police budget defy logic at a time of increased violent crime and traffic deaths, says Wellington's former top police investigator.

While the Budget has supplied police with 200 extra officers, the department's budget has been slashed by $30 million.

Quentin Doig, who left the police this year after 24 years, partly because of concerns about lack of money for frontline police, said he could not fathom the cuts.

"I can't justify it and I wonder who can," he told The Post. The cuts include: * $5.6 million from the budget for property offences.

* $1.7 million for drug and anti-social offences. * $1.7 million for policing traffic.

* $1.5 million for violence and sexual offences. Police Association president Greg O'Connor said the cuts were alarming. Labour police spokesman George Hawkins described them as humiliating.

Mr Doig was most concerned with the $1.5 million cut to the budget to investigate violence and sexual offences.

"We are dealing with murders, rapes and sexual assaults. To hear the budget cut is particularly disappointing, to be honest.

"The staff working in those areas work under extreme pressure now."

Police Minister Jack Elder welcomed the Budget announcement. He said the extra 200 police staff came at a time when police were facing increasing workloads and stress.

"The extra staff will go some way to addressing these issues." He was not available to discuss the overall budget cut.

Mr O'Connor said in a statement he was alarmed at the $30 million cut.

The reductions include a drop of around $15 million for funding frontline police and a further $15.5 million for the capital contribution.

"At a time when there is a demand from the public for police to get serious about crime reduction, their budgets have been cut," he said.

"It is impossible for frontline officers to effectively provide the safety and security demanded by the population under these circumstances. These cuts, when implemented, will negate the impact of any increases in staffing."

Mr Hawkins predicted many police officers would now leave the department in disgust.

"That is a humiliation for the Police Minister. In the old days people used to go to a service station and buy cigarettes and petrol. Now they go and rob them.

"We're going to spend less money investigating violent crime, checking on burglaries and he (Mr Elder) tries to pass it off."

--------------------
Illustration

CAPTION: Quentin Doig - "pressure".

Copyright Independent Newspapers, Ltd. Jun 27, 1997
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Posted 24 January 2012 - 02:45 PM

What I'm reading: [3 Edition]

Evening Post [Wellington, New Zealand] 21 June 1996: 7.

Detective Inspector Quentin Doig
is head of the Wellington district CIB. "I've just finished the Seventh Scroll by Wilbur Smith, I thought it was excellent. I found it quite fascinating the way he wove himself into the story. I gave it to my son and noticed his light was on at quarter past 12 last night so he must be enjoying it too. At the moment I'm reading a couple of management texts, but I like to read all the Patricia Cornwell novels, about a forensic pathologist in Richmond, Virginia. I read all of John Grisham's, and I want to read his new one next. I've also enjoyed Robert Ludlum's books, because they have such an intricate plot. I like a good read that you don't want to put down."
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Posted 24 January 2012 - 02:48 PM

SOMETHING OLD, SOMETHING NEW: [A EDITION]
HUBBARD, Anthony. Sunday Star - Times [Wellington, New Zealand] 04 Mar 2007: C; 5.



Retirement is a dumb idea with no place in modern society - and it will probably hasten your death. So stop dreaming of the day when you stop working, and start living instead, say the authors of a new book. Anthony Hubbard reports. QUENTIN DOIG had the usual dream of early retirement. He would quit being a manager in his 50s and go fishing in his "playground", the Marlborough Sounds. He would watch sport on TV and mess around in his boat. He would float into old age.

He and his wife Faye even had a spreadsheet that mapped their progress towards idle happiness.

"It was all heading in the right direction."

Then the ACC manager went on a leadership course and collided with a few questions.

"How long could I sit in my boat enjoying the fishing?" and "How long could I continue to watch sport and not get bored?" He had never really thought about such things, he says. And when he did, he changed his mind.

Now the 54-year-old Wellingtonian hopes to carry on working for five years and then semi-retire. Instead of a sudden-death withdrawal from work into leisure, he hopes to hire himself out as a part-time consultant who spends the other part of his time playing in the Sounds.

"The issue is that you really need to keep your brain active, and I hadn't thought about how I would do that," says Doig, who is now communications director at Housing New Zealand. He thinks his notion of early retirement came from his 24 years in the police, where early retirement was the norm.

Early retirement is a dream for many because it is regarded as a mark of success. You made your pile early and you can relax. For others, leaving the workforce at 55 is a nightmare. For years, ageing workers have been told anyone over 45 has missed the boat. Youth has taken over, and ageing workers who lost their jobs in their 50s might never work again.

Now there is good news for the battalions of baby boomers heading for retirement: the economy won't be able to do without them. Far from being tossed on the scrap heap, they will be needed. At the same time, there is a growing chorus of voices telling them they shouldn't retire anyway. Giving up work is bad for your health.

"Everything about the retirement concept is wrong," say David Bogan and Keith Davies in their new book, Avoid Retirement and Stay Alive.

"We are not here to shrivel up on a given date and wait to die."

The book - subtitled Why you should never retire and how not to - paints retirement as a recipe for slow death. Retirement isn't natural, but was invented to solve an oversupply of labour, the authors claim. Human beings are genetically hard-wired to keep alive - and keeping alive means working and staying plugged in to society, not giving up and dropping out.

Davies, a former television journalist and now a writer of corporate histories, points to the "looming crisis" ahead. The economy loses hordes of experienced and skilful people - and there are not enough young people to replace them. A shrinking number of workers cannot support a mushrooming crowd of retired folk.

"The baby boomers are the generation that hasn't grown up, but doesn't want to grow old," says Davies, himself a baby boomer.

"When they get to 60, they think of themselves as being 30, and they want to stay in the workplace." Human Rights Commissioner Judy McGregor says New Zealand has hardly begun to think about the implications of all this. On the one hand there is evidence that many want to continue working after 65 and would be better off doing so. And their labour will be needed: it's a case, she says, of "your country needs you".

But what are companies doing about it? So far, not much.

At 65, many may want to carry on working, but at reduced hours or in a less stressful position. Dealing with this is going to require flexible thinking by employers.

"We need to change the way we think about work," says Retirement Commissioner Diana Crossan.

Currently, the debate about work- life balance is usually "about mothers going back to work or mothers staying at work while they have their kids. There's another work-life balance issue, and that is `How do you remain at work and not do quite so much as you used to?"'

This will involve as radical a change to workplace practices as the changes made for women returning to the workforce, she says.

Phil O'Reilly, chief executive of employers' group Business New Zealand, says many businesses think retaining older workers is costly. Done right, he says, it is "highly cost- effective and highly profitable". The company retains the skills, the experience and the irreplaceable institutional memory of senior people; the employees enjoy the fruits of work and increased leisure.

In other western countries, O'Reilly says, companies have made themselves champions of the older worker. They have made a virtue of the necessity of retaining them, and have bragged about it to the world. It's good economics and good PR.

Westpac Australia boss Ann Sherry - now head of Westpac New Zealand - went on the radio and said she would welcome job applications from older people.

"There were 2500 to 3000 responses right after that message from people who wanted to work for a company that was promoting that idea," says Alan Ward, Westpac's head of recruitment and retention in New Zealand.

The company knows it needs its older workers, and it works to accommodate them. This is not charity, he says, but self-interest.

"If you look after your people you get better results for the business.

"We've got a lot of people in the branches who have had relationships with our customers for 15 to 20 years, and in a lot of cases, 30. It's quite amazing how much product knowledge, customer knowledge and Westpac knowledge they have - so we make a deliberate effort to make sure we can keep them happy and suit the job to them."

Older branch managers who want to take things a bit easier, he says, may be transferred to a less stressful suburban branch. Or they may want to move to part-time work, in which case they may take on a mentoring or coaching role for younger staff. The company takes steps to ensure their superannuation is not affected.

Westpac not only retains their skills and experience, it keeps their customer appeal. Grey-haired customers often prefer dealing with grey-haired bankers. And demography shows there will be more and more grey-haired customers.

Ward says the company has a lower attrition rate among older workers than most companies in the industry. It has valued workers in their late 60s and early 70s, and it has no intention of letting them escape.

But Westpac is an exception. Most of the companies taking steps in this area tend to be foreign-owned service providers.

"I don't think we have enough `hero' New Zealand companies doing this," O'Reilly says. "Nor do we have enough celebration of them, so that other companies would want to do what they're doing."

But maybe all of this is too good to be true. What about the boomers who have spent their working lives in hard physical yakka and are broken-bodied at 65? They may need and want to quit. What hope of flexible semi-retirement for them?

"Not everyone wants to keep working," McGregor says, and nor should they have to. Middle-class professionals, with their wide range of marketable skills, have as many advantages at the end of their careers as they have had during them.

But there can be real choices for retiring manual workers too. McGregor cites the case of those who have spent decades on the killing chain at the meatworks. While they may not be able to carry on into their late 60s, they could certainly do valuable work as a quality assurance person.

Managers sometimes object that senior people cost too much to keep on. O'Reilly says mature-age workers are going to have to be flexible as well as management. He puts it delicately.

"If you want to take time off to spend the summer months in Australia, good for you, we want you to enjoy your mature years," he says.

"But you also need to understand there are some trade-offs that we might have to do."

In other words, mature workers are likely to face a pay cut in return for more leisure. They are also likely to find some loss of status - a fact that successful males in particular might find difficult.

And prejudice against older people remains. Will employers really be so eager to retain their 65-year-olds? A study in October last year by Marie Wilson and Jordan Kan of the Auckland University Business School found clear evidence of discrimination against older workers.

They sent written job applications from fictional workers whose qualifications were equal, but whose ages varied. The study found older candidates were much less likely to be shortlisted for a job in sales. However, age was no barrier for applicants for nursing jobs. The difference, McGregor says, was that in nursing there were critical skills shortages, and this was not so in sales.

"The global scarcity of nurses has moderated the age effect," she says.

The question is: will the tightening labour market when the boomers retire overcome lingering prejudice against older workers?

Certainly this prejudice still operates, even though the law has long since forbidden compulsory retirement or any form of discrimination against older people.

A 72-year-old educator, highly respected in her field and valued by her employer, was interviewed for this feature and then decided to pull out. If her name and age were published, she says, people in her field might see her as "a number, 72, rather than as a person with certain skills and experience".

* Avoid Retirement and Stay Alive, published by HarperCollins, $30.

--------------------



Photos:; Caption: From top, Leslie Kay, Quentin Doig and Bruce Tayler are still working.

Copyright Independent Newspapers, Ltd. Mar 4, 2007
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Posted 24 January 2012 - 02:50 PM

Sex industry register will stay, say police: [3 Edition]

WATKINS, Tracy. Evening Post [Wellington, New Zealand] 14 June 1996: 3

Police say they will continue a sex workers register despite the claim by a Wellington escort agency that it believed its listing gave it police approval to operate.

Escort agency owners Karen Glasgow and Edward Truby defended themselves against brothel-keeping charges this week by saying their operation was sanctioned by police.

Police have rubbished the claim, and say Glasgow and Truby's agency, Corporate Affairs, was shut down before the register was fully up and running.

Glasgow and Truby were convicted of brothel-keeping and living off the earnings of prostitution and will be sentenced later this month.

Wellington CIB head, Detective Inspector Quentin Doig, said the register would continue as it was valuable.

It operates in conjunction with Wellington Newspapers, which refuses advertising to agencies that will not supply workers' names to police.

Mr Doig said police wanted to know who was working in the industry and to make sure young people weren't involved.

The register could also help solve crime, including violence against sex workers. "These people are working in the twilight zone and problems can and do occur. We want the channels of communication kept open."

National Prostitutes Collective spokeswoman Catherine Healey said there was confusion among sex workers over use of the police register.

"I've had a number of conversations with workers who've said, `We're OK. We're registered with the police'. They see it as an endorsement."

The collective had grave concerns about the register and had written to Police Commissioner Richard Macdonald about it.

"Use of the register creates an impression that the law requires escort agencies to be on it. In fact, there is no such law and it's not the job of police to impose a de facto law in its absence."

Detective Constable Neil Macrae said escort agencies operated outside the laws governing massage parlours and the register helped keep tabs on them.

But its use would have to be clarified to make clear that being on the register did not mean police condoned the work.

Mr Macrae said police did not use the list to vet agencies. "We simply ask for details of who's working there. We don't turn anyone away."

Copyright Independent Newspapers, Ltd. Jun 14, 1996
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Posted 24 January 2012 - 02:51 PM

Dead man's dna may be link: [2 Edition]

Dominion [Wellington, New Zealand] 16 Aug 1996: 9.

CHRISTCHURCH

POLICE believe they could be close to linking former prison escaper Carl Rolander to a brutal rape in Wellington five years ago.

Rolander died in a Christchurch cottage in February while surrounded by armed police. He shot himself.

He had been a suspect for an unsolved Wellington rape for a while but police could not collect a sample of his blood because he refused.

Police obtained a blood sample for dna testing after his death so they could confirm his involvement or eliminate him from the rape inquiry.

They expect a result from the test within two weeks.

Detective Inspector Quentin Doig of Wellington confirmed yesterday that Rolander was a suspect for the rape, committed in 1991.

"It will be a relief to the victim if the result proves what we suspect," Mr Doig said.

Rolander, 29, blocked previous attempts to obtain a blood sample from him.

Before he killed himself, police had been hoping to force him to provide a sample under new powers given to them by the Investigations (Blood Samples) Act.

The act came into effect on Monday. It allows samples to be taken by force if necessary from people suspected of serious crimes.

Police are expected to reopen investigations into several serious, unsolved crimes now they have the power to force suspects to give dna samples.

A Police Complaints Authority report on Wednesday said Rolander's decision to take his life while surrounded by armed police on February 21 was not the fault of police.

Rolander shot himself in the head three hours into an armed police operation.

The authority said police were right in firing the more than 20 rounds of teargas into the Christchurch house harbouring Rolander.

Copyright Independent Newspapers, Ltd. Aug 16, 1996
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Posted 24 January 2012 - 02:56 PM

ACC can be insensitive, wrong - ombudsman: [2 Edition]

SCANLON, Glen. Dominion [Wellington, New Zealand] 03 Oct 2001: 8.

ACC's handling of compensation and rehabilitation claims has been criticised as "at least insensitive and at times wrong", by chief ombudsman Sir Brian Elwood.

In his annual report, Sir Brian says his office had seen a 70 per cent increase in complaints against ACC in the year ending June 30, with the number rising from 105 to 177.

The complexity of cases and time taken to resolve them had increased, with a number of people expressing extreme anger and frustration at their inability to progress their grievances directly with ACC.

In particular, problems had arisen with a small number of people handled by ACC's remote claims unit. The people appeared to have genuine cause for complaint. The unit was founded after the fatal stabbing of ACC worker Janet Pike in West Auckland in 1999. Its location is secret. It has two claims managers who handle about 40 clients, mostly by telephone or mail.

Though ACC's wish to protect its staff was understandable, in some cases shifting claims to the unit was creating further conflict, Sir Brian says. "In our view, face-to-face contact with some of these complainants is necessary.

"While not condoning the behaviour of some of these people . . . our investigations have revealed that often their grievances are rooted in past actions by the corporation that have been at least insensitive and at times wrong."

The unit was dealing with two such cases, which would not be resolved if ACC maintained its use of the unit, Sir Brian says.

"A process to overcome the impasse has been recommended but not accepted by the corporation, yet it has the ongoing legal responsibility to meet its obligations to them for compensation and rehabilitation."

Sir Brian recommended that ACC offer the two people money for past grievances and that staff meet them directly in as informal an environment as considered reasonable.

ACC chief executive Garry Wilson
said though ACC had said it would not implement the recommendations, it indicated it was prepared to meet both people -- with adequate security provisions. It was unfortunate Sir Brian had not reflected this.

Mr Wilson
said he had commissioned a forensic psychiatrist to review 10 claimants with the unit and was seeking guidance on how to handle many of the unit's clients who were demonstrably mentally unstable. It had arranged for medical and legal experts to help with the two cases referred to by Sir Brian.

Mr Wilson said though the unit's handling process was not ideal, ACC was committed to a responsible, realistic approach, while ensuring the safety of staff.

ACC national security manager Quentin Doig
said people referred to the unit were considered dangerous to staff, not just difficult. ACC received more than one million claims a year and had plenty of difficult clients, who staff were trained to deal with.

The unit's aim was to change dangerous claimants' behaviour and get them back into branch offices, Mr Doig said. The decision to place people with it was a rigorous one that required input from a number of staff. Every six months, ACC reviewed all people placed with the unit.

Because the unit's managers were dealing with a small number of claimants, these claimants received better case management than was the norm in branches.

Sir Brian said yesterday that it appeared some progress was being made. ACC said it was working through the recommendations.

--------------------
Illustration

Caption: Sir Brian

Copyright Independent Newspapers, Ltd. Oct 3, 2001

Remote Claims Unit thread


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Posted 24 January 2012 - 02:59 PM

Companies getting serious about security: [A Edition]

AMERY, Mark. Sunday Star - Times [Wellington, New Zealand] 03 June 2001: E; 1.

COMPANIES are stepping up security to thwart violence and protect intellectual property - and some are even having their boardrooms swept for bugs.

Industrial espionage is becoming an increasing threat because of globalisation, and companies are also trying to combat rising e- crime.

Corporate security expert Bruce Couper, of the Auckland-based Couper Group, said companies had to protect people, property and information. Intellectual property was valuable and any threat could be expensive.

Couper said electronic sweeps of board rooms and the offices of senior executives were usually carried out when sensitive negotiations were under way. "They happen around mergers, acquisitions and takeovers to prevent information getting out, and other times it's done because companies believe individuals have been privy to information they shouldn't be."

Client confidentially prevented Couper from naming the companies, but said they were usually multi-nationals. He was aware of three instances when bugs were found.

Trevor Morley, of Wellington-based Morley Security and Investigation Group, said while it was not common, New Zealand was an industrial espionage target because our security was lax.

"A company's head office might be in America, but security is tighter there so people might target their New Zealand operation because we're a bit more laid back," he said.

His company also swept for bugs. "Corporates need to have good physical security because we could sweep an office at 10am today for a meeting at 10am tomorrow, but what happens to the room in that time?"

Montana CEO Peter Hubscher confirmed the winemaker, embroiled in an ownership tussle, swept its boardroom for bugs.

"We don't do it because we expect problems. It wouldn't be worth anyone's livelihood to bug somewhere and get caught. It's like an insurance policy. We have a fire alarm check and every now and again get the other (electronic sweep) done."

A Lion Nathan spokesman was not aware of electronic sweeps. "A lot of quick work in the case of takeovers is done by telephone conference calls so we change telephone numbers regularly as a security measure," he said.

Other companies declined to comment on the electronic sweeps. "Even if we did them, we wouldn't talk about it," said an Air New Zealand spokesman.

Corporate security companies also focused on e-crimes and nuisance hackers. "Nowadays there is great reliance on computer systems and technology presents its own risk," said Couper. Companies established firewalls, user policies and exemptions to police electronic systems.

Couper said companies needed excellent physical security such as alarms, patrols by security staff, on-site guards and closed-circuit TV monitors. The Couper Group employs full-time security managers for some corporates.

Morley said companies often used inadequate protection. "I was once able to put a page back together that came out of a shredder. It only took 40 minutes and turned out to be a confidential memo. I told them to get a better shredder."

Couper said protecting staff from theft and burglary was also necessary. "People are working longer and funnier hours, so are going to and from work at strange times. We look at safety in car parks and buildings."

The Couper Group trains staff who deal with cash and the public, where there is potential for robbery and confrontation. "We've done work with banks, the Department of Courts and members of the judiciary. And local authorities who have parking wardens and other staff in enforcement roles and who often get abused and assaulted."

Most government departments - WINZ, the IRD, Housing New Zealand and Child Youth and Family - train staff to be safe at work.

ACC employed a security manager after West Auckland ACC worker Janet Pike was stabbed to death in 1999 by a client. The manager, former police officer Quentin Doig, said ACC staff were regularly abused and assaulted.

Meanwhile, Morley said companies should do more to check the backgrounds of prospective staff.

"Companies don't seem to think people working in the new e- commerce field need to be checked out. But just because they're literate doesn't mean they haven't got a criminal background. Computer whizzes are just as adept at stealing from the petty cash tin as anyone."

Cartoon: Business E2

ACC calls in Serious Fraud Office

http://accforum.org/...__1#entry122153
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Posted 24 January 2012 - 03:02 PM

Man sues ACC, alleging abuse of authority: [2 Edition]

CONWAY, Matt. The Press [Christchurch, New Zealand] 20 Jan 2004: A; 6.


A Christchurch man is suing the Accident Compensation Corporation (ACC) and individual staff, alleging that unlawful efforts were made to remove him from the scheme.

Former West Coast carpenter Eddie Chalecki has spent $40,000 on long-running legal battles with the ACC.

Now he has lodged a High Court claim alleging misfeasance -- an abuse of lawful authority -- by the ACC and eight current and former case managers.

They include former Christchurch ACC branch manager Ron Gutschlag and national security manager Quentin Doig.

The lawsuit refers to a 1992 memo by a Greymouth ACC client liaison officer, in which a capacity-for-work assessment was suggested as a way to "get" Chalecki.

"If not, then he will be in receipt of weekly compensation forever?!" said the memo. It was marked "not for the file".

Chalecki has received ACC entitlements for a string of injuries, starting 19 years ago with a prolapsed disc in his back.

He said subsequent injuries to head, knees and wrists occurred when the ACC pushed him to increase his income from a hobby pig farm.

"They started getting tough and threatened me with cessation of my money if I didn't up my hobby farm."

Chalecki said he was forced to work, despite being declared "totally unfit" on a medical certificate.

Supported by the income of his wife Teresa and ongoing ACC entitlements, Chalecki said he was determined to pursue the civil claim.

"I don't care if I end up living in a tent in Hagley Park, but I want justice."

Similar claims by other ACC clients have either been "struck out" by the court or settled confidentially, according to Chalecki's lawyer, Jonathan McCarthy.

It is understood the ACC will attempt to have the Chalecki claim quashed at a hearing scheduled for February 27.

Support groups for aggrieved ACC clients warn the Chalecki case, while not unprecedented, could be a dam-buster. Acclaim Canterbury president Murray Jorgensen said a lot of cases were being prepared.

The ACC would not comment while the Chalecki case was before the court.

Copyright Independent Newspapers, Ltd. Jan 20, 2004
Word count: 339
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Posted 24 January 2012 - 03:03 PM

More trial evidence missing: [3 Edition]

Evening Post [Wellington, New Zealand] 29 Aug 1996: 1.

More trial exhibits are missing from Wellington District Court, and police have widened their investigation.

Exhibits for two trials yet to be held - including a birth certificate, a videotape and photographs - have disappeared.

Courts Department spokesman Geordie Cassin said today criminal activity was a "reasonable possibility".

The discovery follows the disappearance of 25 exhibits, including $400 cash, for two other trials. Those two trials - a drugs case and an assault case - went ahead without the exhibits earlier this month.

It is unclear whether the latest two trials - charges for sexual abuse and receiving stolen property - will be affected.

Mr Cassin said the matter was of "considerable concern".

Staff had been spoken to as part of the department's initial inquiries and asked to put security to the fore.

Any major security changes would be looked at after the police inquiry.

The officer in charge of the case is understood to be overseas.

Detective Inspector Quentin Doig said the inquiry was under way, but he did not know when it would be finished.

"We are following up some more information, but we won't be indicating anything other than that to the media."

Mr Cassin said all the missing exhibits were apparently lodged with the court on June 26 and 27.

"It seems an unusual coincidence, to say the least. (Criminal activity) is certainly a possibility. We don't want to discount anything."

Police are understood to be investigating whether it might be an inside job.

District Court registrar Grant Smith said last week he believed it was the first time in 10 years that exhibits had disappeared.

He said today that the search for the two earlier missing sets of exhibits had revealed that two other sets were unaccounted for.

All other exhibits for pending trials have been accounted for.
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Posted 24 January 2012 - 03:05 PM

DIARY: [2 EDITION]
Dominion [Wellington, New Zealand] 14 Oct 1997.

Constant news reports about officers leaving the force with bucketloads of cash after "perfing", including Wellington CIB boss Quentin Doig, are clearly irritating the Police Association. In a newsletter it points out tartly that "perf" has been mis-translated as Police Emergency Retirement Fund, Preferential Early Retirement Fund and Police Enhanced Retirement Fund. It should, it says, be "Police Employment Rehabilitation Fun". Considering that a perfing cop with 20 years' experience gets about $250,000 from the police's rehabilitation fund super scheme it's not surprising they dropped the "d".
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Posted 24 January 2012 - 03:06 PM

Winz spends $2.7 on air travel in eight months: [2 Edition]

HOWARD, Karen. Dominion [Wellington, New Zealand] 15 Sep 1999: 2.

WORK and Income spent $2.7 million on airfares in eight months.

But Associate Work and Income Minister Peter McCardle was unfazed by the bill, having been reassured by the department that all spending on travel was "necessary and totally within budget".

Most of the money, $2,681,905, was for domestic flights taken between the time the new department opened on October 1, last year, and the end of the financial year on June 30.

The department spent another $72,831 on international airfares during that time.

It was too difficult to establish how many staff the flights were for, the department said, but the total included 48 trips taken by chief executive Christine Rankin till May 30.

She clocked up a bill of $16,884.56 -- $7213 of it for an international trip. Ms Rankin travels business class on any flights longer than 12 hours without a stopover.

Mr McCardle said Work and Income was saving $50 million during its first five years because its costs were less than the Income Support and Employment Service it replaced.

"While accepting that all operational spending is the responsibility of the chief executive, I still expect all expenditure by Winz to be prudent and necessary," he said.

Last month, Ms Rankin was censured and had the performance content of her salary package reviewed by State Services Commissioner Michael Wintringham for spending taxpayer money on chartering flights for staff to attend a training course.

Ms Rankin hired Wellington private investigator Quentin Doig, at a cost of $1155 for 10 1/2 hours' work, to investigate the spending which she blamed on a senior manager who resigned after being suspended.

Work and Income has refused to make public a copy of Mr Doig's report because the auditor-general is still investigating the matter.

Another report on the chartered flights and Ms Rankin's performance, written by chief ombudsman Sir John Robertson at the request of Mr Wintringham, is also being kept secret.

Labour Social Welfare spokesman Steve Maharey said the commission refused him a copy of the report and had now asked the ombudsman to review the refusal.

"We've never had a proper explanation for who's responsible for the $165,000 chartered aircraft debacle," Mr Maharey said.

Work and Income spokeswoman Kate Joblin said the spending on domestic travel was necessary for it to perform essential functions.

--------------------
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Posted 24 January 2012 - 03:08 PM

Fines for refusing sex, court told: [3 Edition]
Workers at Lower Hutt's Phoenix Escort Agency were fined if they refused a client sex or didn't do what they wanted, Wellington District Court heard yesterday.

Names of the agency's clients and workers were suppressed yesterday at the beginning of the trial of the owner for brothelkeeping.

Tracy Marie Currin, 38, listed in court documents as a brothelkeeper, of Petone, pleaded not guilty to keeping a brothel in Randwick Rd, Lower Hutt, and living off the earnings of prostitution in 1997 and 1998.

The trial, before Judge Marion Frater, is expected to take a week.

In opening, Crown prosecutor Bridget Mackintosh said police had seized business records from the agency during searches of the premises and Currin's home in September 1998. From those, she said, police estimated the agency was turning over between $460,000 and $800,000 a year.

Detective Mark Hercock said that between September 22, 1997, and July 6, 1998, he received five complaints about the Capital's sex industry, three of which related to Phoenix. One included a Phoenix client knocking on a neighbour's door by mistake.

Mr Hercock said he went to the Randwick Rd property and saw rooms with magazines, tissues and condoms. A fantasy room had a range of lingerie and sex toys and aids.

He agreed with defence counsel Keith Jefferies that registration of sex workers was not required.

A former sex worker said she was 16 when she worked at Phoenix. She identified a daily ledger that had appointments in it, including her working name four times in a row.

She admitted she had been on a lot of drugs and was mentally unstable while working for Phoenix. She told Mr Jefferies that she had approached Phoenix for a job and had told them she was 18.

Exhibits seized included bank account details, a list of dud customers, a letter to sex workers from former police officer Quentin Doig, an equipment inventory, condoms and a book of regular customers.

(Proceeding)

Copyright Independent Newspapers, Ltd. Mar 28, 2000
Evening Post [Wellington, New Zealand] 28 Mar 2000: 3.
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Posted 24 January 2012 - 03:09 PM

DIARY: [2 EDITION]
Dominion [Wellington, New Zealand] 18 Aug 1998: 6.

The appointment of two former detectives to investigate Courts Department news leaks was duly leaked to The Dominion's court reporter. An official source later confirmed that Quentin Doig and Carl Berryman would investigate "the unauthorised passing on of sensitive information". Asked yesterday about the news suffocation aspect of this, and the cost, department chief executive Wilson Bailey said it was important to maintain the confidentiality of departmental information. The cost of the inquiry was commercially sensitive, he said. In other words taxpayers can pay, though they won't be told the cost.

Copyright Independent Newspapers, Ltd. Aug 18, 1998
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Posted 24 January 2012 - 03:12 PM

The business of pleasure: [A Edition]

GREGG, Stacy. Sunday Star - Times [Wellington, New Zealand] 10 Nov 1996: C; 1

* The sex industry is still in shock after three violent deaths in one week. Business remains slow, yet another blow for prostitution's powerbrokers. STACY GREGG reports

IT'S STRANGE to think the oldest profession in the world didn't really come of age in New Zealand until 1963, when diamond geezer Rainton Hastie opened the Pink Pussycat Club.

In the '70s and early '80s, Mr Hastie controlled the sex scene. Prostitution is a strange business to get nostalgic about but in view of the recent furore surrounding the trade, you could almost get misty-eyed about the days when one man was willing to stand publicly accountable for the entire industry.

By the late '80s, Mr Hastie had begun to relinquish his business interests. By the time he died nearly a year ago, no new kingpin had emerged.

Consequently, when the sex industry is asked to respond to the spate of violent crimes, or the push to have red light districts erased from the city, or the call for decriminalisation, there is no one voice that speaks -- as Mr Hastie once did -- for business interests.

"Back then, the industry was run by two or three bigwigs," says Michelle McGill of the Prostitutes' Collective.

"Today, there's a lot more variety of people involved in the industry. We have a much broader range of smaller operators. There are more women involved in management and women who own, operate and work in their own places, which is a positive change."

In Wellington, CIB Detective Inspector Quentin Doig says the concept of a kingpin doesn't apply.

"There's no key figure. All the parlours and escort agencies are pretty much under separate ownership. There's a rivalry occasionally between parlours or agencies but nothing that has ever bubbled over to become a major crime issue."

The rumour surrounding the Christchurch sex scene is that parlours are controlled by gangs.

Etc, etc..
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Posted 24 January 2012 - 03:14 PM

The sex industry - a thriving trade: [3 Edition]
Evening Post [Wellington, New Zealand] 17 June 1996: 4.

"Love is the answer," wrote the New York Herald Tribune - context unknown - in 1975, "but while you're waiting for the answer, sex raises some pretty good questions." Society today, say critics, is obsessed with sex: it's used to sell cars, it's enacted in intimate detail in hundreds of movies. At its best, it's the most pleasurable of pastimes, quite apart from its procreative role; at its worst, it's manipulative, violent, even cruel.

Sex, via prostitution, has long been an extremely lucrative business: it's still hailed as the world's oldest profession. And, no matter how zealously the authorities worldwide may try from time to time to close brothels, sweep the streets clean of working girls, nab kerb-crawlers and restrict pornography, trade in sex remains brisk and profitable. Just how profitable, even in Wellington - hardly New Zealand's sex capital - became clear last week when police successfully prosecuted Lower Hutt pair Karen Glasgow and Edward Truby for brothelkeeping and living in part off the earnings of prostitution. Court evidence showed their escort-agency business, Corporate Affairs, turned over more than $1 million a year, saw 1000 clients a month and employed 20 women. Since it was closed last July, three new escort agencies have opened in its place, run by Glasgow and Truby's former workers.

Disapprove as moralists might, they won't stamp out this kind of business. It is, like it or not, a service. US author Brendan Francis explained why: the big difference between sex for money and sex for free, he wrote, is that sex for money usually costs a lot less.

None of which is much help to police whose swoop last year on Corporate Affairs and its principals put it out of business. Why that particular agency and not others? Why close such operations at all? Don't they, as sex workers insist, provide a useful service? Won't closures force the industry underground, making it more perilous for those who earn a living by selling sex?

Detective Inspector Quentin Doig, understandably circumspect, won't be drawn on why the Glasgow-Truby establishment was targeted, but his answers to other questions hint at the value judgments police must often make in this vexed area of business endeavour. It's apparent, for example, police target agencies that may be fronts for other crime such as drug-trafficking, that might employ or exploit young women, or that have gang affiliations. At least two such businesses - one in the Hutt and another in Wellington City - are said to be operated by gangs which, police suspect, use them for laundering proceeds from other crime.

The problem for police seems to be the absence of law on the operation, even existence, of escort agencies. Massage parlours are covered by statute but the law is silent on this newer branch of the sex industry. Young Nats, at next week's National Party conference, will seek to have the solicitation of prostitution decriminalised - legalising what is, in effect, fact. Sponsors of the remit aren't holding their breath, however: few politicians, especially in an election year as fraught as this, are brave enough to tackle an issue that will attract vociferous opposition. Which leaves the police between a rock and a hard place - in this context, not the most comfortable position to be in.

Copyright Independent Newspapers, Ltd. Jun 17, 1996
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Posted 24 January 2012 - 03:16 PM

Secret police inquiry snared `satanic' officer; Secret probe nabs officer: [2 Edition]

MORGAN, Jon. Dominion [Wellington, New Zealand] 28 Nov 1996: 1.

DETECTIVES told yesterday of their "nightmare of nightmares" of having to covertly investigate a fellow police officer who had won huge sympathy from police and public for his escape from a satanic assailant.

Brent Garner, 32, a Palmerston North fraud squad detective, yesterday admitted in Palmerston North District Court to faking his torture and attempted murder and to the arson of his Ashhurst house on October 18. He will be sentenced on December 13.

Police yesterday revealed: * A covert operation was set up to investigate Garner when leading detectives began to doubt his story.

* The attack was staged because Garner wanted to "liquidate his assets, separate from his wife and effect a change of direction in his life".

* Garner carved wounds in his back by tying a scalpel to a stick and positioning it on his bed.

* He could not bring himself to go ahead with plans to kill his dog as part of the fake attack.

* He confessed last Saturday, the day after it was made clear in a six-hour interview that he was not believed.

* Garner had planned to take an overseas trip with his wife Sandra this week.

* Garner had a lover, discounted by police as an accomplice. Inquiry head Detective Inspector Doug Brew and his deputy, Detective Senior Sergeant Grant Nicholls, said the decision to set up a second "underground" inquiry by handpicked detectives was made three weeks after the October 18 attack.

Mr Nicholls formed Operation Mars, to run alongside the main inquiry, Operation Venus, named after the Venus Flytrap nickname given to Garner at police training college when he would sit at lectures with his mouth open.

Mr Nicholls said that at that stage he had no hard evidence pointing to Garner. "But what you have is suspicion, you have innuendo, you have gut feelings that something is not right.

Operation Mars was born out of suspicion." Mr Brew shared that suspicion after talking to Garner for 45 minutes on November 11, "but I had to remain open-minded and continue running Operation Venus".

The suspicion was raised by a study of evidence collected at the house fire by detectives, arson experts and forensic scientists. At the same time, private investigators hired by insurance companies were voicing similar doubts.

Mr Nicholls: "You have to realise we were dealing with what appeared to be a very traumatised victim, and his inconsistencies could have been the result of his deception or because he was really traumatised and very mixed up. We couldn't be sure."

* Continued p8

* From p1 At first, Operation Mars was a night-time inquiry. The detectives worked 20-hour days, returning to the office at night after working all day on Operation Venus.

Mr Brew continued to run Venus with the bulk of the inquiry's workforce, while at the same time the Mars investigation was carefully hidden away in secret computer files.

Aspects that were looked at more closely were: * If events on the night of the attack had happened precisely as Garner had said, why hadn't the attacker seen Garner when he escaped from the house and gone back to kill him, as this was clearly his aim.

"But you have to balance these things," Mr Nicholls said. "It was four o'clock in the morning, it was very dark. It was possible they might not have seen each other. You had a severely traumatised victim. What might have seemed half an hour might have actually been five minutes."

* The four letters written by the supposed attacker contained some police and legal terminology. Mr Nicholls: "But again we couldn't be sure. The letters might have been written by a disaffected policeman from another jurisdiction, or by an ex-police officer. For every plus we had a minus."

* How easy was it for Garner to tie up and gag himself? Mr Nicholls: "I tested it out, pulled the cable ties through behind my back -- it took about two minutes."

* As Operation Venus continued and every lead ran out, this also turned further suspicion on Garner. Mr Nicholls: "Every door was being closed. That might happen in the movies but it doesn't happen in real life."

But that wasn't enough. "What we had were only indicators, and I wouldn't like to go to trial on those alone," Mr Nicholls said.

Mr Brew: "Right up till last Saturday we had reasonable grounds to believe that a circumstantial case existed, but those reasonable grounds fell just short of what was needed to secure a conviction." So last Friday Garner was called in to face six hours of questioning by Mr Nicholls and Detective Inspector Quentin Doig, a Wellington detective who had reviewed the case file.

"We went through his statement of the attack -- ran a very critical eye over it," Mr Nicholls said. "He was left in no doubt that we didn't believe everything he said."

Garner stopped the interview at the end of the day and agreed to return on Monday with his lawyer. "When we parted I said to him I hoped I would see him before then. He was scornful of that."

But Mr Nicholls was not surprised to see Garner the next day. "I said, `I understand you want to see me'. He said, `I'm responsible'. "He looked like a great weight had been lifted off his shoulders."

And Mr Nicholls's and Mr Brew's reaction? "It seemed like a great weight had been lifted off our shoulders."

Mr Brew said after the confession Garner asked to see him. He apologised to him and Mr Nicholls. "He broke down in tears. It was a huge relief to him.

"At the end of the day we almost got it right, but it took Garner himself to complete the puzzle."

Mr Nicholls: "I feel sorry for him. He was once a competent police officer, now he's a criminal."
Illustration

CAPTION: Photo DAVE HANSFORD Brent Garner arrives at Palmerston North District Court yesterday where he pleaded guilty to eight charges Photo BILL KEARNS Mr Nicholls, left, and Mr Brew at yesterday's press conference Photo BILL KEARNS Detective Senior Sergeant Grant Nicholls . . . "I had to remain open- minded"

Copyright Independent Newspapers, Ltd. Nov 28, 1996
Word count: 1034
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Posted 24 January 2012 - 03:20 PM

Quentin DOIG http://www.hnzc.co.nz/

http://www.accfocus....-shortages.html

http://www.accfocus....tate-house.html
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Posted 24 January 2012 - 03:54 PM

POWER CENTRE MOORHOUSE LIMITED (937685)

http://www.business....26sf%3D%26sd%3D

CORPORATE RISKS (NZ) 2000 LIMITED (858827)

http://www.business....26sf%3D%26sd%3D

CORPORATE RISKS NEW ZEALAND (NI) LIMITED (1041058)

http://www.business....26sf%3D%26sd%3D

CORPORATE RISKS NEW ZEALAND LIMITED (1041052)

http://www.business....26sf%3D%26sd%3D



HARAKEKE INVESTMENTS LIMITED (1041057)
-

http://www.business....26sf%3D%26sd%3D


QMD PROPERTIES LIMITED (1190376)

http://www.business....26sf%3D%26sd%3D











CHRISTOPHER DOIG PROMOTIONS LIMITED (1218145)

http://www.business....26sf%3D%26sd%3D
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Posted 25 January 2012 - 08:22 PM

Note the dates and years various transactions occured.

It appears Quentin Max DOIG was operating a company / business, QMD Properties Limited throughout the time he was employed within the Public Service, including whilst at http://www.acc.co.nz

Is this not a possible Conflict of Interest and in breach of the State Services Code of Conduct?

Was he in any way involved in the development of the Apartment/ motel complex at 45 Beach Rd, Picton, now known as Apartments on the Waterfront http://www.apartment...terfront.co.nz/ when it was constructed?

It is understood he has an ownership interest in 5/45 Beach Road, Picton.

http://www.harcourts...5-45-Beach-Road

Public Service Code of Conduct

http://accforum.org/...ode-of-conduct/


http://www.business....26sf%3D%26sd%3D



QMD PROPERTIES LIMITED


Last updated on 20 Sep 2011
Certificate of Incorporation All Company Details


Company Summary
Addresses
Directors (2)
Shareholdings (2)
Documents (22)
PPSR Search

Full legal name: Faye Julie DOIG
Residential Address: Unit 5, 45 Beach Road, Waikawa Bay, Picton, 7220 , New Zealand
Appointment Date: 20 Sep 2011
Consent: View Consent Form

Full legal name: Quentin Max DOIG
Residential Address: Unit 5, 45 Beach Road, Waikawa Bay, Picton ,
Appointment Date: 19 Feb 2002
Consent: View Consent Form


http://www.business....1057/directors#

HARAKEKE INVESTMENTS LIMITED
To maintain this company log on here
Hide previous names
CORPORATE RISKS NEW ZEALAND (SI) LIMITED (02 Sep 2002)
Last updated on 22 Jul 2011
Certificate of Incorporation All Company Details
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Company Summary
Addresses
Directors (1)
Shareholdings (1)
Documents (21)
PPSR Search

Full legal name: Kevin Maxwell BURROWES
Residential Address: 36 Harakeke Street, Christchurch, 8011 , New Zealand
Appointment Date: 14 Jun 2000
Consent: View Consent Form

Historic data for directors
Hide History

Former Directors
Full legal name: Quentin Max DOIG
Residential Address: 20 Rama Crescent, Khandallah ,
Appointment Date: 14 Jun 2000
Ceased date: 23 Jun 2000

Consent: View Consent Form

http://www.business....26sf%3D%26sd%3D


CORPORATE RISKS NEW ZEALAND LIMITED

To maintain this company log on here
Last updated on 04 Apr 2011
Certificate of Incorporation All Company Details
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Addresses
Directors (2)
Shareholdings (2)
Documents (27)
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Full legal name: Patrick John COADY
Residential Address: 26 Westburn Terrace, Burnside, Christchurch, 8041 , New Zealand
Appointment Date: 25 Sep 2002
Consent: View Consent Form

Full legal name: Russell Brian JOSEPH
Residential Address: 42 The Masthead, Whitby, Porirua, 5024 , New Zealand
Appointment Date: 23 Jun 2000
Consent: View Consent Form

Historic data for directors
Hide History

Former Directors
Full legal name: Kevin Maxwell BURROWES
Residential Address: 36 Harakeke Street, Christchurch ,
Appointment Date: 13 Jun 2000
Ceased date: 25 Sep 2002
Consent: View Consent Form

Full legal name: Quentin Max DOIG
Residential Address: 20 Rama Crescent, Khandallah ,
Appointment Date: 13 Jun 2000
Ceased date: 23 Jun 2000

Consent: View Consent Form


http://www.business....08122/directors

PROPERTY PROTECTION SERVICES LIMITED
To maintain this company log on here
Last updated on 25 Jun 2010
Certificate of Incorporation All Company Details


Company Summary
Addresses
Directors (2)
Shareholdings (2)
Documents (13)
PPSR Search

Full legal name: Kevin Maxwell BURROWES
Residential Address: 36 Harakeke Street, Christchurch, 8011 , New Zealand
Appointment Date: 21 May 1998
Consent: View Consent Form

Full legal name: Patrick John COADY
Residential Address: 26 Westburn Terrace, Christchurch, 8041 , New Zealand
Appointment Date: 28 Jul 2000
Consent: View Consent Form

Historic data for directors
Hide History

Former Directors
Full legal name: Quentin Max DOIG
Residential Address: 20 Rama Crescent, Khandallah, Wellington ,
Appointment Date: 21 May 1998
Ceased date: 28 Jul 2000
Consent: View Consent Form


Full legal name: David Alastair HORSBURGH
Residential Address: 12 Loasby Crescent, Newlands, Wellington ,
Appointment Date: 21 May 1998
Ceased date: 28 Oct 1999
Consent: View Consent Form

Full legal name: Carl William BERRYMAN
Residential Address: 45 Boxhill, Khandallah ,
Appointment Date: 21 May 1998
Ceased date: 30 Oct 1998
Consent: View Consent Form
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Posted 25 January 2012 - 09:10 PM

20 Rama Crescent, Khandallah, Wellington which was previously owned by Quentin Max DOIG was sold in 2009.

Note the http://www.police.govt.nz helmet on the table to the left.

http://www.nz.open2v...photo/208591/18

And the antiques in other photos.


http://www.wellingto...y.php?id=208591

D #208591 (KH7518) - Khandallah - SOLD


previous image take the photo tour next image

Auction
Residential, House

20 Rama Crescent Khandallah
Suburb: Khandallah
Area: Wellington North
Region: Wellington

Floor area: 190 m2 (2044.4 Sq. Feet)
Land area: 502 m2 (5401.52 Sq. Feet)
Built in: 1960's
Bedrooms: 3
Bathrooms: 2

KEYWORDS
Features
2 Living areas
Air Conditioning
Central Heating
Conservatory
Double Garage
Ensuite
Office / Study
Spa
Walk in Wardrobe
Location
Sea views



Sitting in a sought after sunny location, this 1960's one-level contemporary home designed by architect Fritz Eisenhofer has been stunningly enhanced with the addition of a kitchen/family area and large deck, by renowned architect Gerald Parsonson. The high quality of workmanship and chattels are evident throughout and has created a desirable family home with amazing views over the harbour and city. Two teenagers have loved growing up in this home, with wonderful spaces for enjoying the views and family activities. The formal separate lounge and dining area make entertaining a pleasure. With tasteful décor throughout there is little to do but move in and enjoy. The outdoor areas are complete "rooms" in themselves. This home will appeal to a broad market. Located in a sought after area in the "Embassy Row" area of Khandallah, Rama Crescent enjoys close proximity to the CBD and the Khandallah Village shops, cafes and top-rated primary and secondary schools



Listing Salesperson
Name: Liz Capovilla - Harcourts Team Wellington MREINZ
Licensed (Real Estate Agents Act 2008)
Member of REINZ
Phone: 04 803 1795
Mobile: 021 452 276

Email: liz.capovilla@harcourts.co.nz

View all this salesperson's property

http://www.wellingto...allah%20%206035

Valued in 2009 at around $1.410 million.

http://www.wellingto...archaddress.y=6

Property Details
Address: 20 Rama Crescent Khandallah 6035
Valuation Number: 16820-15907
Land Area: 502 Sq metres
Legal Description: LOT 6 D P 26935
Nature of Improvements: Key »
View Aerial Photo »

Rates Details
Current Rating Year: 1 July 2011 - 30 June 2012
Account Number: 1084817
Account Status: Current
Rates - Total Charge: $4,041.69
Differential Rating Category: Base
Billing Category: A1
Rates Breakdown »

Rates Valuation Details
Effective Date: 01 Jul 2011
Land Value: $550,000
Capital Value: $860,000
Current Date of Valuation is as at 1 September 2009
Valuation and Rates Summary »


A great investment return for someone whom is understood to have Perfed from the Police on Medical grounds.

How many people whom have genuine injuries and Medical conditions were incorrectly exited from http://www.acc.co.nz have been left homeless and have no hope of ever having their own home whilst he has been in the roles he has whilst he has continued to live a luxurious lifestyle?

How many genuinely injured members of http://www.police.govt.nz have been disadvantaged as a result of the way he may well have misled the Authorities to gain Police Early Retirement Funds for Medical reasons and resulted in the enquiry and changes to the scheme?

Did Quentin Max DOIG, if it is true he took early retirement due to Medical reasons, obtain a Full & Proper Medical Clearance, at the time, to return to work so soon after leaving the Police?

Was he a "Fit and proper" person to be operating as a Private Investigator so soon after he is understood to have taken Police Early Retirement Funding on Medical grounds from the http://www.police.govt.nz?

In our opinion the manner in which he departed from the http://www.police.govt.nz and how he subsequently has conducted himself, including setting up businesses should be investigated and disclosed. It is considerable Public funds he has received and if people have sufferred adverse harm, if he wasn't a "Fit and Proper" person, at the time, they should receive an apology and recompense.

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